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March 1, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
Vancouver has held its closing ceremony. Well done, eh? But the real Olympic sport, political jockeying, is in full stride. Let the Games begin. Last week, the new chief executive of the United States Olympic Committee, Scott Blackmun, tossed a chip on the Olympic poker table when he told a Washington Post reporter that the USOC "does not plan to enter a U.S. city in the race for the 2020 Summer Games." He also said he doesn't know when there will be the next attempt to "bring a Games to U.S. soil."
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SPORTS
April 8, 2014 | By David Wharton
Speaking to reporters after a board of directors meeting in Los Angeles on Tuesday, U.S. Olympic Committee leaders said they are in the process of meeting with fewer than 10 American cities interested in bidding for the 2024 Summer Games. The informal discussions will help them decide on two or three domestic finalists. Once the field is narrowed, the USOC will then choose a bid representative -- or choose not to bid at all. "Our goal is to make a decision by the end of the year," said Scott Blackmun, the USOC's chief executive, adding that the current talks have focused on "which cities do we think can put together a bid that is going to be a fantastic bid. " The Southern California Committee for the Olympic Games has been working on details for bringing the Olympics to Los Angeles for a third time.
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SPORTS
February 23, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON
In an unexpected turnaround, the U.S. Olympic Committee is due today to reconsider whether it ought to give interim CEO Scott Blackmun the job permanently and forgo the nationwide search it opted last month to undertake. Blackmun, 43, a former USOC general counsel, has held the interim tag since October, when CEO Norm Blake stepped down.
SPORTS
December 3, 2013 | By David Wharton
Bidding for a Jesse Owens gold medal from the 1936 Berlin Olympics had reached $278,000 as of Tuesday afternoon, but had not met the reserve price. The whereabouts of the other three golds that Owens won that summer is not known. His performance was historically significant because the Games were overseen by Adolph Hitler, who hoped to use them as a showcase for the Nazi party. "Obviously, that's one of the most poignant moments in the history of the Olympic Games," Scott Blackmun, chief executive of the U.S. Olympic Committee, told reporters in a teleconference after a USOC board meeting Tuesday.
SPORTS
December 3, 2013 | By David Wharton
Bidding for a Jesse Owens gold medal from the 1936 Berlin Olympics had reached $278,000 as of Tuesday afternoon, but had not met the reserve price. The whereabouts of the other three golds that Owens won that summer is not known. His performance was historically significant because the Games were overseen by Adolph Hitler, who hoped to use them as a showcase for the Nazi party. "Obviously, that's one of the most poignant moments in the history of the Olympic Games," Scott Blackmun, chief executive of the U.S. Olympic Committee, told reporters in a teleconference after a USOC board meeting Tuesday.
SPORTS
March 7, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
In February, the U.S. Olympic Committee sent a letter to the mayors of 35 cities, asking their interest in being the official U.S. candidate to host the 2024 Summer Games. Los Angeles was included in that list, and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa sent the official reply Monday. Yes, L.A. would love to host the Games. "On behalf of the City of Los Angeles, I am pleased to confirm out enthusiastic interest in bidding to host the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games," Villaraigosa said in the letter sent to Scott Blackmun, the chief executive of the USOC.
SPORTS
April 8, 2014 | By David Wharton
Speaking to reporters after a board of directors meeting in Los Angeles on Tuesday, U.S. Olympic Committee leaders said they are in the process of meeting with fewer than 10 American cities interested in bidding for the 2024 Summer Games. The informal discussions will help them decide on two or three domestic finalists. Once the field is narrowed, the USOC will then choose a bid representative -- or choose not to bid at all. "Our goal is to make a decision by the end of the year," said Scott Blackmun, the USOC's chief executive, adding that the current talks have focused on "which cities do we think can put together a bid that is going to be a fantastic bid. " The Southern California Committee for the Olympic Games has been working on details for bringing the Olympics to Los Angeles for a third time.
SPORTS
November 1, 2000 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scott Blackmun, a senior U.S. Olympic committee executive, was named its acting CEO on Tuesday, replacing Norm Blake. Blake had announced his resignation last week amid escalating internal resistance to him and his wide-ranging plan to remake the USOC into a more business-savvy enterprise. Blackmun's appointment, announced at USOC headquarters in Colorado Springs, Colo., by Chairman Bill Hybl, is effective immediately.
SPORTS
July 4, 2005 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Four years ago in Moscow, when the International Olympic Committee picked Beijing to stage the 2008 Games, Scott Blackmun roamed the lobby of the Mezhdunorodnaya Hotel as acting chief executive of the U.S. Olympic Committee. This week, as the IOC gathers here to pick the 2012 Summer Games city -- New York, London, Paris, Moscow or Madrid, the vote coming Wednesday -- Blackmun has been recruited to work the lobby once more. But not on behalf of the USOC.
SPORTS
January 15, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States Olympic Committee, in an unexpected jolt that may hold profound implications for its future direction as well as planning for the upcoming Salt Lake Winter Olympics, opted Sunday not to make its interim chief executive officer the permanent boss but instead to search for a top-notch executive with "in-depth" Olympic know-how. Interim CEO Scott Blackmun had been proclaimed the "best man for the job" before Sunday's meeting of the USOC's policymaking Executive Committee.
SPORTS
March 16, 2013 | By David Wharton
No one doubts that Los Angeles is ready, willing and able to host another Summer Olympics. There are a handful of major league sports venues and an ample fan base, not to mention a reliably sunny climate, all of which contributed to two successful Games in the past. "L.A. is the one place in the world that is always ready to host," said Anita DeFrantz, an International Olympic Committee member and longtime resident. "It's a city that loves sports. " But that doesn't mean the U.S. Olympic Committee or the IOC necessarily favors returning to Southern California.
SPORTS
March 7, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
In February, the U.S. Olympic Committee sent a letter to the mayors of 35 cities, asking their interest in being the official U.S. candidate to host the 2024 Summer Games. Los Angeles was included in that list, and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa sent the official reply Monday. Yes, L.A. would love to host the Games. "On behalf of the City of Los Angeles, I am pleased to confirm out enthusiastic interest in bidding to host the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games," Villaraigosa said in the letter sent to Scott Blackmun, the chief executive of the USOC.
SPORTS
May 24, 2012 | By Philip Hersh
When historians of such things seek the moment the U.S. Olympic Committee found a way to forge the agreement Thursday that put the U.S. back in the game as a potential Olympic Games host, they need look no further than Oct. 7, 2009. It was five days after Chicago had suffered a humiliating first-round loss in the International Olympic Committee vote for host of the 2016 Summer Olympics. There quickly followed calls for heads in the USOC leadership to roll. It was the day USOC Chairman Larry Probst got so angry about being called out by some of his constituents, including athletes and the heads of the national sports federations, that he vowed to show them.
SPORTS
March 1, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
Vancouver has held its closing ceremony. Well done, eh? But the real Olympic sport, political jockeying, is in full stride. Let the Games begin. Last week, the new chief executive of the United States Olympic Committee, Scott Blackmun, tossed a chip on the Olympic poker table when he told a Washington Post reporter that the USOC "does not plan to enter a U.S. city in the race for the 2020 Summer Games." He also said he doesn't know when there will be the next attempt to "bring a Games to U.S. soil."
SPORTS
December 11, 2009 | By Philip Hersh
The field for the new chief executive of the United States Olympic Committee has been cut to about a half-dozen candidates, according to Chicago Tribune sources familiar with the search. Among the finalists are: -- Sandy Alderson, a former major league baseball vice-president and former CEO of the San Diego Padres. -- Scott Blackmun, former USOC general counsel and its acting CEO in 2000-01. -- Norm Bellingham, the current chief operating officer of the USOC.
SPORTS
July 4, 2005 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Four years ago in Moscow, when the International Olympic Committee picked Beijing to stage the 2008 Games, Scott Blackmun roamed the lobby of the Mezhdunorodnaya Hotel as acting chief executive of the U.S. Olympic Committee. This week, as the IOC gathers here to pick the 2012 Summer Games city -- New York, London, Paris, Moscow or Madrid, the vote coming Wednesday -- Blackmun has been recruited to work the lobby once more. But not on behalf of the USOC.
SPORTS
May 24, 2012 | By Philip Hersh
When historians of such things seek the moment the U.S. Olympic Committee found a way to forge the agreement Thursday that put the U.S. back in the game as a potential Olympic Games host, they need look no further than Oct. 7, 2009. It was five days after Chicago had suffered a humiliating first-round loss in the International Olympic Committee vote for host of the 2016 Summer Olympics. There quickly followed calls for heads in the USOC leadership to roll. It was the day USOC Chairman Larry Probst got so angry about being called out by some of his constituents, including athletes and the heads of the national sports federations, that he vowed to show them.
SPORTS
April 30, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid intensifying uncertainty over the status of acting CEO Scott Blackmun, the U.S. Olympic Committee on Sunday approved a nearly $125-million annualized budget and confirmed a remarkably ambitious goal of winning 20 medals at the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Games. The steps marked the latest twists in the ongoing adventure that is the hallmark of operations at the USOC--described Sunday by USOC President Sandra Baldwin as a "wonderful family, sometimes dysfunctional."
SPORTS
April 30, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid intensifying uncertainty over the status of acting CEO Scott Blackmun, the U.S. Olympic Committee on Sunday approved a nearly $125-million annualized budget and confirmed a remarkably ambitious goal of winning 20 medals at the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Games. The steps marked the latest twists in the ongoing adventure that is the hallmark of operations at the USOC--described Sunday by USOC President Sandra Baldwin as a "wonderful family, sometimes dysfunctional."
SPORTS
February 23, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON
In an unexpected turnaround, the U.S. Olympic Committee is due today to reconsider whether it ought to give interim CEO Scott Blackmun the job permanently and forgo the nationwide search it opted last month to undertake. Blackmun, 43, a former USOC general counsel, has held the interim tag since October, when CEO Norm Blake stepped down.
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