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Scott Charney

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BUSINESS
February 13, 2002 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates pledged in January to transform the company's approach to security and privacy, the software industry sensed a coming sea change. "Trustworthy computing is more important than any other part of our work ... the highest priority" Gates wrote in a memo to Microsoft employees Jan. 15. The details of Gates' strategy have been scant, but the company took a major step forward Jan.
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BUSINESS
February 13, 2002 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates pledged in January to transform the company's approach to security and privacy, the software industry sensed a coming sea change. "Trustworthy computing is more important than any other part of our work ... the highest priority" Gates wrote in a memo to Microsoft employees Jan. 15. The details of Gates' strategy have been scant, but the company took a major step forward Jan.
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BUSINESS
February 1, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Microsoft, stung by several high-profile software viruses over the last year, said it hired a PricewaterhouseCoopers forensics consultant to oversee security strategy. Scott Charney, principal for digital risk management and forensics at PricewaterhouseCoopers, will assume the role of chief of security strategy April 1. He is replacing Howard Schmidt, who has left for a position with the federal government. Charney joins Microsoft as security becomes the largest software maker's No. 1 priority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2011 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
At the Long Beach Ballet academy on Wardlow Road, pint-sized ballerinas get dressed upstairs in Signal Hill. When they go downstairs for class, the dance floor is in Long Beach. That's because city lines pierce right through the building, making it a two-city hybrid that was created when 100-year-old boundaries got overtaken by development. From time to time, the oddity has created confusion among business owners and residents seeking to get business licenses, pay taxes or obtain police services.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Citing an urgent need to crack down on high-tech crime, the Justice Department and two federal law enforcement agencies announced Friday a joint initiative aimed at fighting software piracy and the counterfeiting of computer products. Through the Intellectual Property Rights Initiative, staff from the Justice Department, the FBI and U.S.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2003 | From Reuters
Companies cleaned up their computer systems Sunday after a fast-spreading worm shut down Web servers in an attack that slowed the Internet for users around the world. South Korea, which has a large Internet population, was believed to be hit the hardest in the attack, which began early Saturday, spreading through network connections rather than e-mail as many viruses do. The worm, dubbed "SQL Slammer" because it exploits a weakness in Microsoft Corp.'
MAGAZINE
September 12, 1993 | Jonathan Littman, Jonathan Littman is the author of "Once Upon a Time in Computerland." Cyberpunks can reach him on the Internet at jlittman@well.sf.ca.us
Today is the day!" squealed disc jockey Rick Dees. "This is song number one, 'Escapade,' by Janet Jackson. If it is followed by 'Love Shack' by the B-52's and 'Kiss' by Prince, you could be caller number 102 and win a brand new $50,000 Porsche!" KIIS-FM called it "Win a Porsche by Friday": eight Porsches--about $400,000 worth of steel, leather and status--given away, one a week. You could hardly live or work in Los Angeles without being caught up in the frenzy.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1993 | From Times Staff & Wire Reports
The Resolution Trust Corp.'s top lawyer authorized a secret search of an employee's computer that turned up files detailing whistle-blowing activities, a document shows. An internal agency memo shows that RTC officials conducted the search after failing to persuade the agency's inspector general to do it. The memo also says that the inspector general assured the RTC officials that they would not be investigated if questions were later raised.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2000 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The obstacles to finding the perpetrators of this week's Internet sabotage may be as much cultural as technical, underscored by an enduring mistrust of the FBI by technology firms. As the FBI pressed ahead with a broad investigation of those who disrupted Yahoo and other popular Web sites, officials called for a strong partnership between law enforcement and the high-tech industry.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2002 | JUSTIN POPE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Digital Evolution Inc. of Santa Monica already had a chief technology officer and plenty of security experts. What the Web services company lacked was a point person on security. Or as the man ultimately hired for the job remarked, clients wanted "one neck to choke." Erick Herring was hired in August 2001 as chief security officer, a title that hardly existed two years ago.
NEWS
April 24, 1999 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The case is about glue, adhesives, disposable-diaper tape and the high technology of no-lick stamps. It is also, federal prosecutors contend, about criminal espionage. In the first trial to come from the Economic Espionage Act of 1996, two executives with a Taiwanese firm are accused of stealing industry trade secrets from Pasadena-based label-maker Avery Dennison Corp., paying an Avery researcher $160,000 to spirit out secrets.
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