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NEWS
June 27, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Scott Colley Quartet isn't an ensemble that shows up prominently on anyone's jazz radar screen. But with a lineup that includes, in addition to bassist Colley, saxophonist Ravi Coltrane, guitarist Adam Rogers and drummer Bill Stewart--each a leader in his own right--it should, and, one hopes, soon will. On Tuesday night at the Jazz Bakery, the quartet played an opening set belying the fact that the musicians were still somewhat glazed from having flown in that afternoon.
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NEWS
June 27, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Scott Colley Quartet isn't an ensemble that shows up prominently on anyone's jazz radar screen. But with a lineup that includes, in addition to bassist Colley, saxophonist Ravi Coltrane, guitarist Adam Rogers and drummer Bill Stewart--each a leader in his own right--it should, and, one hopes, soon will. On Tuesday night at the Jazz Bakery, the quartet played an opening set belying the fact that the musicians were still somewhat glazed from having flown in that afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1987 | A. JAMES LISKA
It was supposed to be a sextet of the fairer sex Monday night at Donte's, but things got changed around a bit and three of the women couldn't make it and so two male subs were sent, making it just a quintet. But it really wouldn't have mattered if only Diana Krall, the pianist, had shown up for the first set. That is not in any way meant to suggest that the work of fluegelhornist Stacy Rowles and valve trombonist Betty O'Hara was less than admirable.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As aspiring teenage musicians growing up in Eagle Rock nearly 20 years ago, bassist Scott Colley and guitarist Larry Koonse played together often at any club or restaurant that would have them. Their long-standing musical relationship took a hiatus in 1988 when Colley moved to New York and began working with Art Farmer, T.S. Monk, John Scofield and others. Koonse remained in Southern California to pursue studio work, teaching and performing as a member of the L.A. Jazz Quartet and other bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1986
The CalArts Jazz Ensemble received the highest honors in the small ensemble category at the 28th Annual Collegiate Jazz Festival held recently at Notre Dame University. The ensemble received the outstanding performance award, playing works by Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and Ornette Coleman. CalArts student musicians garnered six of the eight outstanding individual instrumentalists awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Great jazz improvisers are born, not made. There are plenty of players on the current scene who, through hard work and practice, have made themselves into facile, even virtuosic improvisers. But there are far fewer whose music, despite their fast-fingered technique, comes from a place of pure imagination. One of the growingly visible members of that highly exclusive fraternity is tenor saxophonist Chris Potter.
NEWS
January 8, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
What's a jazz artist to do when his most heartfelt music triggers shrugs from record company executives? Especially when the artist -- Billy Childs -- has a solid reputation as a first-rate pianist, has been nominated for four Grammys and is a sought-after arranger (for Dianne Reeves, Claudia Acuna, Gary Lemel and others)? The answer, for Childs as for many other musicians, is simple: Do it yourself.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER
The sextet led by Thelonious Monk Jr. (a.k.a. T. S. Monk) visited Los Angeles all too briefly, a three-day engagement at Catalina's that was scheduled to close Sunday. Monk's role in this group is unlike that of his famous father. Playing drums rather than piano and leaving the compositions and arrangements to others, he has a tightly knit unit that draws its repertoire mainly from the works of his father's contemporaries. The senior Thelonious was represented in "Monk's Dream."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As aspiring teenage musicians growing up in Eagle Rock nearly 20 years ago, bassist Scott Colley and guitarist Larry Koonse played together often at any club or restaurant that would have them. Their long-standing musical relationship took a hiatus in 1988 when Colley moved to New York and began working with Art Farmer, T.S. Monk, John Scofield and others. Koonse remained in Southern California to pursue studio work, teaching and performing as a member of the L.A. Jazz Quartet and other bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1987 | A. JAMES LISKA
It was supposed to be a sextet of the fairer sex Monday night at Donte's, but things got changed around a bit and three of the women couldn't make it and so two male subs were sent, making it just a quintet. But it really wouldn't have mattered if only Diana Krall, the pianist, had shown up for the first set. That is not in any way meant to suggest that the work of fluegelhornist Stacy Rowles and valve trombonist Betty O'Hara was less than admirable.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
Guitarist Jim Hall, a former Angeleno (he first came to prominence here, in 1956, with the Chico Hamilton Quintet), made one of his rare visits from New York on Sunday, when he played for an overflow house at the Jazz Bakery. Though he has been compared to everyone from Charlie Christian to Django Reinhardt, Hall has long since developed his own persona, characterized by a sensitive, often subdued sound and by uniquely ethereal compositions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was hard to understand why the Jazz Bakery wasn't overflowing with guitarists Thursday night for the opening performance by Jim Hall and Scott Colley. How often, after all, does one get to hear one of the finest jazz guitarists in the world, working in a chamber music setting with the sole accompaniment of a talented young bassist? Not very often at all, in fact, and it was a revelation to hear Hall at the top of his game, performing in such relatively spontaneous fashion.
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