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Scott F O Grady

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NEWS
June 16, 1995 | ART PINE and WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Pentagon is looking into whether NATO early warning radar planes flying close to Air Force Capt. Scott F. O'Grady's F-16 jet fighter on June 2 had enough time to warn him that reconnaissance aircraft had discovered Bosnian Serb missile batteries in the area.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1996 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stick a war hero in a room with 50 kids and what do they want to know? How many bugs did U.S. Air Force Capt. Scott F. O'Grady have to eat while hiding from the Bosnian troops who shot down his F-16 fighter jet in 1995? O'Grady was way ahead of them: "I had some water in my survival pack, and I had to eat certain kinds of insects and plants to survive," O'Grady told the Santa Clarita Christian School fifth-graders whom he met during a visit to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.
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NEWS
August 9, 1995 | Associated Press
Air Force Capt. Scott F. O'Grady, the F-16 pilot shot down over Bosnia two months ago, said he plans to leave active duty this fall and transfer to the Air Force Reserve. "All of this is positive," O'Grady said in a written statement issued Monday by the public affairs office at the Pentagon. O'Grady, 29, said that as an Air Force reservist he will continue flying and will act as a "positive spokesman for the military."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1996 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been more than 16 months since U.S. Air Force Capt. Scott O'Grady's fighter plane was shot down in the skies over Bosnia and he emerged a national hero. His harrowing story of spending six days and six nights hiding from the Serbs and surviving on a diet of rainwater, insects, leaves and grass before being rescued by Marines has already been told countless times. But the public's admiration hasn't slackened, judging from reaction to O'Grady's appearance Sunday at the Crystal Cathedral.
NEWS
June 9, 1995 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While an anxious nation--including his family and friends--fretted for days that Capt. Scott F. O'Grady might never be found alive after his F-16 jet was shot down over Bosnia-Herzegovina, his superiors and experts in military survival training knew better. To them, the developments that sounded so ominous in news reports were signs of hope. Far from despairing, the experts sensed that the downed pilot was alive and well and behaving exactly the way he had been trained to do.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | From Associated Press
Here is Capt. Scott F. O'Grady's speech at Aviano Air Base: Yeah, right! Thank you all for coming out. This is overwhelming. I just cannot believe the response I'm getting. I'm really humbled by all this, it's amazing. I don't believe that this is happening. Right off the bat, I want to say hello to my folks back home, my dad and my mom, my sister and brother. Then all I want to do is to make a short statement, then I'll be talking to you all here in the course of the next day or two later on.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Force pilot Scott F. O'Grady, still insisting he did nothing heroic, got a hero's welcome at the White House on Monday--but couldn't quite eat everything on the menu. Capt. O'Grady, who survived by eating ants and grass for nearly six days after his F-16 was shot down June 2 over Bosnia-Herzegovina, was President Clinton's guest of honor at an elegant lunch of lamb chops with shiitake mushrooms. But when waiters served a side dish of spring greens, O'Grady looked glumly at his plate. "Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1996 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stick a war hero in a room with 50 kids and what do they want to know? How many bugs did U.S. Air Force Capt. Scott F. O'Grady have to eat while hiding from the Bosnian troops who shot down his F-16 fighter jet in 1995? O'Grady was way ahead of them: "I had some water in my survival pack, and I had to eat certain kinds of insects and plants to survive," O'Grady told the Santa Clarita Christian School fifth-graders whom he met during a visit to the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sense, Christian Polintan is the flip side of Capt. Scott F. O'Grady's success story. O'Grady relied on the skills he learned in a rigorous Air Force survival training program to elude capture in Bosnia-Herzegovina after his F-16 was shot down by Bosnian Serb forces. Rescued after nearly a week, he is on his way home now to what will be a hero's welcome at Andrews Air Force Base near Washington on Sunday. In 1993, Polintan, then a cadet at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Y ou may have heard about the reported late-night talk-show battle between CBS' David Letterman and NBC's Jay Leno over who gets first dibs on Capt. Scott F. O'Grady, the rescued Air Force pilot who became a national hero by surviving on ants and grass for nearly six days after his F-16 was shot down over Bosnia-Herzegovina. With that kind of resume, the 29-year-old O'Grady is naturally the guest everyone wants.
NEWS
August 9, 1995 | Associated Press
Air Force Capt. Scott F. O'Grady, the F-16 pilot shot down over Bosnia two months ago, said he plans to leave active duty this fall and transfer to the Air Force Reserve. "All of this is positive," O'Grady said in a written statement issued Monday by the public affairs office at the Pentagon. O'Grady, 29, said that as an Air Force reservist he will continue flying and will act as a "positive spokesman for the military."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Y ou may have heard about the reported late-night talk-show battle between CBS' David Letterman and NBC's Jay Leno over who gets first dibs on Capt. Scott F. O'Grady, the rescued Air Force pilot who became a national hero by surviving on ants and grass for nearly six days after his F-16 was shot down over Bosnia-Herzegovina. With that kind of resume, the 29-year-old O'Grady is naturally the guest everyone wants.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | ART PINE and WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Pentagon is looking into whether NATO early warning radar planes flying close to Air Force Capt. Scott F. O'Grady's F-16 jet fighter on June 2 had enough time to warn him that reconnaissance aircraft had discovered Bosnian Serb missile batteries in the area.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Force pilot Scott F. O'Grady, still insisting he did nothing heroic, got a hero's welcome at the White House on Monday--but couldn't quite eat everything on the menu. Capt. O'Grady, who survived by eating ants and grass for nearly six days after his F-16 was shot down June 2 over Bosnia-Herzegovina, was President Clinton's guest of honor at an elegant lunch of lamb chops with shiitake mushrooms. But when waiters served a side dish of spring greens, O'Grady looked glumly at his plate. "Mr.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | From Associated Press
Here is Capt. Scott F. O'Grady's speech at Aviano Air Base: Yeah, right! Thank you all for coming out. This is overwhelming. I just cannot believe the response I'm getting. I'm really humbled by all this, it's amazing. I don't believe that this is happening. Right off the bat, I want to say hello to my folks back home, my dad and my mom, my sister and brother. Then all I want to do is to make a short statement, then I'll be talking to you all here in the course of the next day or two later on.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American hero came home to an emotional Main Street welcome in an airplane hangar Friday--and to sobering news from his boss that he had been the victim of an ambush carefully set by the Bosnian Serbs. Air Force Capt. Scott F. O'Grady, safe after eluding capture in Bosnia-Herzegovina for almost six days, fought tears as he addressed an all-American crowd come to salute his return. U.S.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American hero came home to an emotional Main Street welcome in an airplane hangar Friday--and to sobering news from his boss that he had been the victim of an ambush carefully set by the Bosnian Serbs. Air Force Capt. Scott F. O'Grady, safe after eluding capture in Bosnia-Herzegovina for almost six days, fought tears as he addressed an all-American crowd come to salute his return. U.S.
NEWS
June 9, 1995 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN and JENNIFER CORBETT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In his first phone call home after his rescue Thursday, Air Force Capt. Scott F. O'Grady observed that he had used up one of his nine lives when his F-16 was blown out of the sky by a missile over Bosnia-Herzegovina--and now, he said, he only has six lives left. The joke touched on the core theme of the 29-year-old pilot's life: O'Grady relishes living on the edge and getting away with it--sometimes almost miraculously.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sense, Christian Polintan is the flip side of Capt. Scott F. O'Grady's success story. O'Grady relied on the skills he learned in a rigorous Air Force survival training program to elude capture in Bosnia-Herzegovina after his F-16 was shot down by Bosnian Serb forces. Rescued after nearly a week, he is on his way home now to what will be a hero's welcome at Andrews Air Force Base near Washington on Sunday. In 1993, Polintan, then a cadet at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo.
NEWS
June 9, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
America rejoiced Thursday at the rescue of a downed F-16 pilot from a rebel Serb-encircled hillside in Bosnia-Herzegovina as Western defense ministers gave the allied effort in the Balkan war new momentum by endorsing the creation of a multinational rapid-reaction force to protect embattled U.N. peacekeepers. Capt. Scott F.
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