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September 24, 2012 | by Carolyn Kellogg
Today marks the 116th birthday of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Happy birthday! Fitzgerald's story was filled with highs and lows. His first novel, "This Side of Paradise," put him on the map, but the novel and two short story collections he followed it with failed to hit. When his next book, "The Great Gatsby," was published in 1925, the Los Angeles Times wrote that Fitzgerald's first novel had brought him "premature fame. " The Times reviewer Lillian C. Ford was genuinely impressed by "The Great Gatsby.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Jasmine Elist
In F. Scott Fitzgerald's second novel, “The Beautiful and Damned,” he referred to alcohol as “the rose colored glasses of life.” When taking a close look at the lives of America's greatest authors, it may come as no surprise that often there has been a strong link between creativity and alcohol. The relationship between a writer and liquor is typically a love-hate relationship: beginning with love and following up with dependence, denial, anxiety and resentment. It was this complicated interaction of creativity and alcoholism that inspired author Olivia Laing to write “The Trip to Echo Spring: On Writers and Drinking” (Picador, $26)
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Since the publication in 1920 of F. Scott Fitzgerald's first novel, "This Side of Paradise," his life and career have been scrutinized, studied and dissected in countless critical essays, articles and biographies. Hollywood too has been endlessly fascinated with his novels and short stories. In fact, there have been four feature adaptations alone of his 1925 Jazz Age novel, "The Great Gatsby," the latest being Baz Luhrmann's opulent 3D version that opened to big ticket sales Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Gay Talese came to be known as one of the most elegant, intelligent magazine writers of the 20th century. While he has written many brilliant pieces, the most indelible is his 1966 Esquire story headlined " Frank Sinatra Has a Cold . " At the Neiman Storyboard on Tuesday, Talese sat down to talk about the piece with Elon Green. Talese explained that he didn't want to write the story in the first place, contextualizing some choices he made as a writer in a detailed annotation.
NEWS
May 19, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last two years of F. Scott Fitzgerald's troubled life, as he toiled on his novel, "The Last Tycoon," Frances Kroll Ring was at his side, working as his secretary. Fitzgerald never finished the scathing, brilliant look at Hollywood because he died of a heart attack at the age of 44 on Dec. 21, 1940. (It was published posthumously, unfinished.) At the time of his death, Fitzgerald was an all-but-forgotten literary figure.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
In his younger and more vulnerable years, director John Collins flatly rejected the idea that theater is about bringing words on paper to life. He instead placed his trust in actors, space and movement as the most basic building blocks of stagecraft. "I wanted my plays to be made from what happened between actors moving around in rehearsal," said Collins, founder of the New York-based experimental theater company Elevator Repair Service. "That to me was fundamental to theater, more fundamental than text.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby" is widely recognized as a literary masterwork. Yet as even the book's editor, Maxwell Perkins, said to Fitzgerald about a draft of the 1925 novel, the title character "is somewhat vague. " Hazy doesn't work in cinema, so when director Baz Luhrmann decided to bring "Gatsby" to the screen, he and his creative team went on the filmmaking equivalent of an anthropological dig. The goal: unearth what was left unsaid in Fitzgerald's slender tale of Jay Gatsby, a millionaire bootlegger, and his unrequited love for a married socialite, Daisy Buchanan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Baz Luhrmann's "The Great Gatsby" opens wide this Friday. Eighty-eight years before -- to the day -- the Los Angeles Times ran this review of the original "The Great Gatsby," the novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Today, perception of the book's reception in 1925 varies -- some say it was successful , others that it was a dismal failure -- but our review, by Lillian C. Ford, is purely positive. And she captures something of what has made the book a classic. "The Seamy Side of Society," read the headline, with this below: "In 'The Great Gatsby,' F. Scott Fitzgerald Creates a New Kind of Underworld Character and Throws the Spotlight on the Jaded Lives of the Idle Rich.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Susan King
Leonardo DiCaprio is one of a handful of actors who have portrayed F. Scott Fitzgerald's tragic protagonist “The Great Gatsby” in film and TV over the last 87 years. Warner Baxter, who won the best actor Oscar as the Cisco Kid in the 1929 western “In Old Arizona,” played the role of Jay Gatsby in the lavish 1926 adaptation directed by Herbert Brenon. The advertising tag line for the film declared: “The Picture is the Dramatic Thunderbolt of the Season.” The film was released shortly after a theatrical adaptation opened on Broadway, with James Rennie as Gatsby.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2013 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
Baz Luhrmann didn't want to answer the question. "I can't really say it about myself," he said. "But yes, I do. " The Australian director behind this month's hip-hop-inspired adaptation of "The Great Gatsby" had been asked if he thinks his movies - which in addition to "Gatsby" include 1996's "Romeo + Juliet" and 2001's "Moulin Rouge!" - use music differently than do most Hollywood pictures. PHOTOS: 'The Great Gatsby' premiere "Everything I say already sounds pretentious," he replied with a note of hesitation unusual for the voluble filmmaker.
TRAVEL
September 1, 2013 | By Craig Turner
PARIS - Charles Trueheart, the director of the American Library in Paris, picked through the shelves in his office and withdrew a surprisingly well-preserved June 1922 edition of the long-gone literary magazine the Smart Set. The cover touted a short story debuting in that issue: "A Diamond as Big as the Ritz" by F. Scott Fitzgerald. That Trueheart can easily lay his hands on a journal roughly contemporaneous with the Paris expat years of one of America's leading writers is appropriate, because the American Library is a living, thriving link to the literary love affair that many Americans have had with the French capital.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Hold on to your hats: Things are about to get hot around here. Hot, that is, for people who love books, who covet literary rarities and whose pulses race at the thought of holding a first edition of F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby" in their very own hands. Sotheby's held an auction of literary items on Tuesday, and it was a wild success. Items by David Foster Wallace and 16th century French writer Michel de Montaigne both sold for more than $100,000 more than their estimated prices.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
A first edition of "The Great Gatsby" is being auctioned Tuesday at Sotheby's in New York. The classic novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald is expected to sell for $100,000 to $150,000. When "The Great Gatsby" was first published in 1925, its dust jacket featured the now-iconic cover art by Francis Cugat, with two eyes, a teardrop, and the bright lights of the city below. The copy for sale includes the dust jacket, although it is somewhat battered. According to legend, and quite unusually, the classic cover became part of the text of the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The National Endowment for the Arts announced $1 million in grants for the Big Read projects taking place across the U.S. in 2013-14. The Big Read was launched in 2005 to help create one-city-one-book-style projects; for each title on its list, it offers reading guides, discussion questions, and other supporting materials -- as well as grants, which in this round range from $3,000 to $17,300. Grants are made to nonprofits in communities that, in addition to promote reading the books, plan a range of activities around them.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In college, I once wrote a paper arguing that rock 'n' roll songs were poetry in sonic form. I was not, at the time, aware of Richard Goldstein's 1972 anthology “The Poetry of Rock,” which made a similar case, gathering lyrics and presenting them as verse, but I was under the sway of a cluster of poet/musicians: Lou Reed , Patti Smith , Jim Carroll , even Jim Morrison , whose posthumous spoken word record “An American Prayer” I...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
CANNES, France -- The movie world feted an old friend Wednesday night, or at least an old sport. Two weeks after celebrating Baz Luhrmann's big-budget adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel with a throwback party at the Plaza Hotel in New York, Warner Bros. did it all over again with a more modern gathering at the Cannes Film Festival. The occasion, of course, was the festival's opening night and the film's impending opening in France and other European countries. PHOTOS: Cannes Film Festival scene In a theatrical touch Luhrmann himself might have appreciated (or even orchestrated)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2013 | By Chris Lee
Call it the Great Gats-lash. In the lead-up to the arrival of Baz Luhrmann's kinetic reimagining of F. Scott Fitzgerald's “The Great Gatsby,” in theaters Friday, most critical thumbs are pointing either sideways or downward. Mixed reviews are a common enough occurrence for an intended summer blockbuster - none of the “Fast & Furious” movies racked up gigantic box-office grosses based on their critical bona fides, after all - but it's a strange predicament for a film with such a pedigree.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
To judge by some of the reviews of the new film adaptation of "The Great Gatsby," you'd think Australian director Baz Luhrmann would be facing extradition for his crime against an American classic. But I have a message for all those self-appointed protectors of F. Scott Fitzgerald's indelible novel: The book doesn't need your condemnation of this supposed 3-D travesty to survive. If it can live through the tedium of Jack Clayton's 1974 movie version with Robert Redford and Mia Farrow, it can live through anything.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Literary scholars and film experts will debate whether F. Scott Fitzgerald would have embraced or abhorred a big-budget 3-D version of “The Great Gatsby.” (Baz Luhrmann has speculated that the author, a famous showman, might have liked it.) But there's one thing Fitzgerald almost unequivocally would have enjoyed about the new movie: its box-office success. The new Leonardo DiCaprio-Carey Mulligan version of the film opened to $51.1 million in the U.S. this past weekend, higher than many analysts expected and certainly more than many of the skeptics predicted when the movie was delayed from last holiday season.
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