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Scott Glenn

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NEWS
March 24, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before boarding his mainland-bound flight from Hawaii last April, actor Scott Glenn picked up a paperback copy of "Diamond Head," Irvine writer Charles Knief's 1996 debut mystery novel. "Diamond Head," the first in a series featuring a Hawaii-based private eye who lives aboard a sailboat, finds ex-Navy SEAL John Caine facing contract killers, raging fires and tiger sharks as he searches for the killer of an old Navy friend's daughter who has been raped and murdered.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Thirty years ago, Scott Glenn was ready to leave Hollywood forever. "I hadn't had a job in two years," he says. "I thought I was never going to have a career in front of the cameras." So after spending a blissful summer in Ketchum, Idaho, with his artist wife, Carol, and their two young daughters, Dakota and Rio, the family decided to pull up roots in Los Angeles and move to the picturesque northwestern town.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Thirty years ago, Scott Glenn was ready to leave Hollywood forever. "I hadn't had a job in two years," he says. "I thought I was never going to have a career in front of the cameras." So after spending a blissful summer in Ketchum, Idaho, with his artist wife, Carol, and their two young daughters, Dakota and Rio, the family decided to pull up roots in Los Angeles and move to the picturesque northwestern town.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
A man's face fills the screen. His eyes expand in terror, his mouth opens double-wide, he screams "AVALANCHE" as if the fate of nations hung on the word. You can run, you can hide, but ready or not, "Vertical Limit" is that kind of a movie. In theory, these high-octane extravaganzas, old-fashioned in form but bristling with up-to-the-minute special-effects technology, should be business as usual for Hollywood. In reality, making a success of high-altitude heroics is something of a lost art.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1989 | John M. Wilson
You'd probably see Oscar-winner Ben Johnson (Best Supporting Actor, "The Last Picture Show," 1971) more often on the big screen, but he's got a strict rule about the films he appears in: "No cuss words, no pornography." Now 71, he's been involved in some lower-budget movies of late--"Cherry 2000," "Back to Back," "Dark Before Dawn," all of which he admits he hasn't seen--but he's singing the praises of his latest.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Squinty-eyed and sinewy, Scott Glenn is perfect casting as a rodeo veteran in "My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys" (selected theaters), which itself is perfectly enjoyable under Stuart Rosenberg's laid-back direction--until Joel Don Humphreys's script cops out at the finish. After an absence of five years, Glenn's H.D. Dalton, a bull rider, heads home to Guthrie, Okla., to recuperate from his latest goring.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A little thicker around the middle and a lot more sparse on top than he was in 1962, John Glenn was strapped into a spaceship for a countdown drill for the first time in 36 years. The 77-year-old senator readily practiced everything he will have to do for real in less than three weeks. The rehearsal at Florida's Kennedy Space Center ended with three seconds remaining on the countdown clocks and the crew successfully practicing an emergency evacuation.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
A man's face fills the screen. His eyes expand in terror, his mouth opens double-wide, he screams "AVALANCHE" as if the fate of nations hung on the word. You can run, you can hide, but ready or not, "Vertical Limit" is that kind of a movie. In theory, these high-octane extravaganzas, old-fashioned in form but bristling with up-to-the-minute special-effects technology, should be business as usual for Hollywood. In reality, making a success of high-altitude heroics is something of a lost art.
NEWS
March 24, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before boarding his mainland-bound flight from Hawaii last April, actor Scott Glenn picked up a paperback copy of "Diamond Head," Irvine writer Charles Knief's 1996 debut mystery novel. "Diamond Head," the first in a series featuring a Hawaii-based private eye who lives aboard a sailboat, finds ex-Navy SEAL John Caine facing contract killers, raging fires and tiger sharks as he searches for the killer of an old Navy friend's daughter who has been raped and murdered.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A little thicker around the middle and a lot more sparse on top than he was in 1962, John Glenn was strapped into a spaceship for a countdown drill for the first time in 36 years. The 77-year-old senator readily practiced everything he will have to do for real in less than three weeks. The rehearsal at Florida's Kennedy Space Center ended with three seconds remaining on the countdown clocks and the crew successfully practicing an emergency evacuation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Squinty-eyed and sinewy, Scott Glenn is perfect casting as a rodeo veteran in "My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys" (selected theaters), which itself is perfectly enjoyable under Stuart Rosenberg's laid-back direction--until Joel Don Humphreys's script cops out at the finish. After an absence of five years, Glenn's H.D. Dalton, a bull rider, heads home to Guthrie, Okla., to recuperate from his latest goring.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1989 | John M. Wilson
You'd probably see Oscar-winner Ben Johnson (Best Supporting Actor, "The Last Picture Show," 1971) more often on the big screen, but he's got a strict rule about the films he appears in: "No cuss words, no pornography." Now 71, he's been involved in some lower-budget movies of late--"Cherry 2000," "Back to Back," "Dark Before Dawn," all of which he admits he hasn't seen--but he's singing the praises of his latest.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Sucker Punch," Zack Snyder's violent mash-up of Dickensian dark morality with Moulin Rouge couture is stun-gun gorgeous, psychosexually unnerving, fantasy action-riffic and most definitely not for the faint of heart. Starring the pretty pout of Emily Browning's Babydoll ? sporting machine guns, Mary Janes, black stockings and little else ? the film is, existentially speaking, a Freudian nightmare gunning for debate as much as entertainment. Some will see the worst sort of objectification in its Victoria's Secret-esque femme front line that also includes the scantily clad corps of Abbie Cornish, Jena Malone, Vanessa Hudgens and Jamie Chung.
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