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Scott Helvenston

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MAGAZINE
April 25, 2004 | Candice Reed, Candice Reed is a freelance writer based in Vista, Calif.
Scott Helvenston's chiseled movie-star face flashes through my mind whenever I run on the beach. It's mainly because of him that I stay in shape. Every morning before I head out on my run, I read the paper. Early this month, I stared at the photograph of the charred bodies dangling from a bridge over the Euphrates River. Thank God that isn't anyone I know, I thought selfishly, and turned the page. Two days later my friend Ciaran e-mailed me.
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MAGAZINE
April 25, 2004 | Candice Reed, Candice Reed is a freelance writer based in Vista, Calif.
Scott Helvenston's chiseled movie-star face flashes through my mind whenever I run on the beach. It's mainly because of him that I stay in shape. Every morning before I head out on my run, I read the paper. Early this month, I stared at the photograph of the charred bodies dangling from a bridge over the Euphrates River. Thank God that isn't anyone I know, I thought selfishly, and turned the page. Two days later my friend Ciaran e-mailed me.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2004 | Deborah Schoch, Julie Tamaki and Monte Morin, Times Staff Writers
Stephen "Scott" Helvenston was Hollywood's image of a soldier -- blond, bronzed and broad shouldered. In fact, the 38-year-old former Navy SEAL trained health-conscious Californians how to pump iron like commandos and coached movie stars to play the role of combat-ready recruits.
MAGAZINE
May 16, 2004
The finest piece in the April 25 magazine was on Scott Helvenston, a true hero who was killed in Iraq while protecting the delivery of food ("A Good Man Gone," by Candice Reed, Metropolis). His picture, and not McGruder's, should have been on the cover. Barb Hawley Via the Internet As a Vietnam vet, I have seen more than my share of wartime death and destruction. Given the volume of media coverage of the war in Iraq, I had become jaded to its heartbreaking realities.
OPINION
September 16, 2004 | Jonathan Turley, Jonathan Turley is a law professor at George Washington University.
David A. Passaro was a mercenary working for the United States. A former Special Forces soldier, he was on the job for the American government in Afghanistan on June 19, 2003, when he was told to get information from a detainee named Abdul Wali. When Wali insisted that he knew nothing, Passaro allegedly beat him to death with a heavy metal flashlight.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2007 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
The families of four security workers killed by a mob in Fallouja, Iraq, told a congressional panel Wednesday that the workers' employer, Blackwater USA, had failed to provide the arms and armor they needed for their protection. Four female relatives said the men, whose bodies were burned and dragged through the streets in the 2004 attack, had been sent on a dangerous mission in vehicles without needed armor, maps, heavy machine guns or rear gunners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2005 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
Families of four American men who were killed and burned by Iraqi insurgents in Fallouja last March sued Blackwater Security Consulting on Wednesday, accusing the high-profile private security firm of fraud and of putting its employees at unnecessary risk. After the men were killed, two of the bodies were strung up on a bridge over the Euphrates River, and photos were transmitted around the world. The suit, filed in Raleigh, N.C.
NATIONAL
April 14, 2004 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
The four friends, best buddies since their football-playing days at a small-town high school, came together Tuesday for one final time on a muggy, overcast afternoon at a cemetery here. There was Eddy Twyford, now a salesman for a pharmaceutical company. Jimmy Tharpe, the smart one the others had cheated off of, flew in from Australia, where he runs a professional basketball team.
WORLD
April 2, 2004 | Edmund Sanders and Tony Perry, Times Staff Writers
U.S. officials in Iraq on Thursday vowed an "overwhelming" response to the brutal killing of four American security contractors in Fallouja, but said a military strike was not imminent. Authorities here said they would seek to tame the Sunni Muslim-dominated city, a hotbed of anti-American violence since a bloody incident last April in which residents say U.S. soldiers opened fire on a crowd of protesters, killing 14.
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