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Scott Horowitz

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2000 | KATIE COOPER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scott Horowitz is up there orbiting the Earth at 17,000 mph on a risky mission to fix the international space station. But down here, in the comfort and safety of this bedroom community, his father is as cool as a cucumber. "He was trained to do this job," Seymour Horowitz said rather matter-of-factly of his son the astronaut, who is piloting the space shuttle Atlantis, which blasted off from the Kennedy Space Center eight days ago. "If he wasn't good enough, NASA wouldn't put him in the seat."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2000 | KATIE COOPER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scott Horowitz is up there orbiting the Earth at 17,000 mph on a risky mission to fix the international space station. But down here, in the comfort and safety of this bedroom community, his father is as cool as a cucumber. "He was trained to do this job," Seymour Horowitz said rather matter-of-factly of his son the astronaut, who is piloting the space shuttle Atlantis, which blasted off from the Kennedy Space Center eight days ago. "If he wasn't good enough, NASA wouldn't put him in the seat."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2000 | KATIE COOPER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scott Horowitz is up there orbiting Earth at 17,000 mph, soon to finish a risky mission to fix the international space station. But down here, in the comfort and safety of his east county home, his father is as cool as a cucumber. "He was trained to do this job," Seymour Horowitz said matter-of-factly of his son, the astronaut, who is piloting the space shuttle Atlantis, which blasted off from Kennedy Space Center on May 19. "If he wasn't good enough, NASA wouldn't put him in the seat."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2000 | KATIE COOPER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scott Horowitz is up there orbiting Earth at 17,000 mph, soon to finish a risky mission to fix the international space station. But down here, in the comfort and safety of his east county home, his father is as cool as a cucumber. "He was trained to do this job," Seymour Horowitz said matter-of-factly of his son, the astronaut, who is piloting the space shuttle Atlantis, which blasted off from Kennedy Space Center on May 19. "If he wasn't good enough, NASA wouldn't put him in the seat."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blasting skyward on a thundering cloud of white smoke, the space shuttle Columbia was launched into space Thursday with CSUN alumnus Scott Horowitz in the pilot's seat. Horowitz, who was raised in Thousand Oaks, took off aboard Columbia at 12:18 p.m. local time from Kennedy Space Center in Florida with six other astronauts on a 14-day mission to generate electricity with an Italian satellite on a conducting tether.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1992 | BLAINE HALLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was an inspirational note from his sixth-grade teacher 23 years ago that planted the idea of going into outer space in test pilot Scott Horowitz's mind. "To one of the finest students in the sixth grade," the teacher, Wendell Smith of Acacia School in Thousand Oaks, wrote in a scrapbook. "With your will and determination, you may be one of the astronauts of tomorrow."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2000 | KATIE COOPER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scott Horowitz is up there orbiting Earth at 17,000 mph, soon to finish a risky mission to fix the international space station. But down here, in the comfort and safety of his east county home, his father is as cool as a cucumber. "He was trained to do this job," Seymour Horowitz said matter-of-factly of his son, the astronaut, who is piloting the space shuttle Atlantis, which blasted off from Kennedy Space Center on May 19. "If he wasn't good enough, NASA wouldn't put him in the seat."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blasting skyward on a thundering cloud of white smoke, the space shuttle Columbia was launched into space Thursday with former Thousand Oaks resident Scott Horowitz in the pilot's seat. Horowitz, a graduate of Newbury Park High School, took off aboard Columbia at 12:18 p.m. local time from Kennedy Space Center in Florida with six other astronauts on a 14-day mission to generate electricity with an Italian satellite on a conducting tether.
NEWS
February 28, 1989
"Today" show co-host Bryant Gumbel complained in an in-house memo that weatherman Willard Scott's antics are in "bad taste" and that Gene Shalit's film reviews are often late, a newspaper reported today. Almost no one associated with television's No. 1 morning news show escaped reproach except co-anchor Jane Pauley, who is not mentioned in the memo to Marty Ryan, executive producer of the NBC program, New York Newsday said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2000 | KATIE COOPER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scott Horowitz is up there orbiting Earth at 17,000 mph, soon to finish a risky mission to fix the international space station. But down here, in the comfort and safety of his east county home, his father is as cool as a cucumber. "He was trained to do this job," Seymour Horowitz said matter-of-factly of his son, the astronaut, who is piloting the space shuttle Atlantis, which blasted off from Kennedy Space Center on May 19. "If he wasn't good enough, NASA wouldn't put him in the seat."
NEWS
March 26, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For astronaut and Cal State Northridge alumnus Scott Horowitz, the problems on his first mission began six seconds after liftoff. "As pilot my job was to look after all the systems, and the power gauge for the left engine was registering only 40% power," recalled Horowitz, who piloted space shuttle Columbia on a mission that began Feb. 22. "It turned out to be false alarm, but it really got my adrenaline going."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blasting skyward on a thundering cloud of white smoke, the space shuttle Columbia was launched into space Thursday with CSUN alumnus Scott Horowitz in the pilot's seat. Horowitz, who was raised in Thousand Oaks, took off aboard Columbia at 12:18 p.m. local time from Kennedy Space Center in Florida with six other astronauts on a 14-day mission to generate electricity with an Italian satellite on a conducting tether.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blasting skyward on a thundering cloud of white smoke, the space shuttle Columbia was launched into space Thursday with former Thousand Oaks resident Scott Horowitz in the pilot's seat. Horowitz, a graduate of Newbury Park High School, took off aboard Columbia at 12:18 p.m. local time from Kennedy Space Center in Florida with six other astronauts on a 14-day mission to generate electricity with an Italian satellite on a conducting tether.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1992 | BLAINE HALLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was an inspirational note from his sixth-grade teacher 23 years ago that planted the idea of going into outer space in test pilot Scott Horowitz's mind. "To one of the finest students in the sixth grade," the teacher, Wendell Smith of Acacia School in Thousand Oaks, wrote in a scrapbook. "With your will and determination, you may be one of the astronauts of tomorrow."
NEWS
March 26, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For astronaut and Cal State Northridge alumnus Scott Horowitz, the problems on his first mission began six seconds after liftoff. "As pilot my job was to look after all the systems, and the power gauge for the left engine was registering only 40% power," recalled Horowitz, who piloted space shuttle Columbia on a mission that began Feb. 22. "It turned out to be false alarm, but it really got my adrenaline going."
NEWS
February 28, 1989
"Today" show co-host Bryant Gumbel complained in an in-house memo that weatherman Willard Scott's antics are in "bad taste" and that Gene Shalit's film reviews are often late, a newspaper reported today. Almost no one associated with television's No. 1 morning news show escaped reproach except co-anchor Jane Pauley, who is not mentioned in the memo to Marty Ryan, executive producer of the NBC program, New York Newsday said.
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