Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScott Kraft
IN THE NEWS

Scott Kraft

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 30, 1997
Scott Kraft, a veteran reporter and deputy foreign editor of the Los Angeles Times, has been named national editor of the paper, Editor Michael Parks announced Wednesday. Kraft will succeed Norman C. "Mike" Miller, who has directed The Times' national coverage since 1983. Miller helped to lead many changes in that coverage, including the expansion of the paper's Washington bureau, widely regarded as among the most influential in the nation. He will retire Friday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 27, 2014
As deputy managing editor, Scott Kraft is responsible for the front page, the Column One feature and major investigative, explanatory and narrative reporting projects. During more than two decades at The Times, Kraft has been a national and foreign correspondent as well as a news department head. He joined the paper as a staff writer in its Chicago bureau and later was bureau chief in Nairobi, Johannesburg and Paris. He covered the release of Nelson Mandela and the end of apartheid and the ill-fated U.S. military mission in Somalia, among other major stories.
Advertisement
MAGAZINE
November 29, 1992
"Winnie Mandela Woos the Masses" (by Scott Kraft, Oct. 25) portrays Winnie and Nelson Mandela as riding in separate cars on the same train, Nelson being the statesman and Winnie the warrior. In the 1960s, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. were also moving toward the same goal, but one was a a warrior and the other a statesman. As long as there is racism, oppression, apartheid and any other form of racial injustice in the world, warriors and statesmen are needed to fight it. Today, more than ever, we need more Martin Luther Kings and Malcolm Xs, more Nelson and Winnie Mandelas.
MAGAZINE
June 3, 2007
The effective use of tutors in India to help students in America serves as a cautionary tale for education policymakers ("Calling India," by Scott Kraft, May 6). We persist in the comforting delusion that a four-year college degree, particularly from a marquee-name school, will be the ticket to financial success. This approach is not only unrealistic for the majority of college-bound students, but it is harmful for the majority of vocationally talented students. It exacerbates the appalling dropout rate among the latter group by forcing them to take courses they have no interest in, or aptitude for, when they could instead be taking classes that provide the training they want and need.
TRAVEL
March 15, 1992
In November of 1986 I was sent by my company to Johannesburg. The first Saturday I was in South Africa, wanting to see something of the city, the hotel guidebook directed me to the Market area that Scott Kraft talks about ("Street Scenes," Traveling in Style magazine). Within the first 15 minutes out of the car, one man grabbed one arm, another man grabbed the other and a third held his knife to my neck. Although the street was quite crowded, there was no question but that they were completely in control; that there was no danger of their being stopped or apprehended.
MAGAZINE
October 9, 2005
Congratulations on the eclectic, splendid Sept. 11 issue. Though I have been a subscriber for more than 20 years, I was always enchanted with the New York Times Magazine. For a long time I've been frustrated by the frothy, usually L.A.-obsessed content of your magazine, and I've been meaning to write to you. But now I can write with praise. The Sept. 11 cover story on South Africa ("After the Fire," by Scott Kraft) is an in-depth article with profound and fascinating significance.
MAGAZINE
June 3, 2007
The effective use of tutors in India to help students in America serves as a cautionary tale for education policymakers ("Calling India," by Scott Kraft, May 6). We persist in the comforting delusion that a four-year college degree, particularly from a marquee-name school, will be the ticket to financial success. This approach is not only unrealistic for the majority of college-bound students, but it is harmful for the majority of vocationally talented students. It exacerbates the appalling dropout rate among the latter group by forcing them to take courses they have no interest in, or aptitude for, when they could instead be taking classes that provide the training they want and need.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1993
Your editorial "A Line Never to Be Crossed" (April 14) with regard to the Anti-Defamation League was, for the most part, right on target. As you correctly noted, "it is no surprise that the ADL has kept close tabs on individuals and groups of all stripes that trade in hate or violence. . . ." Indeed, for decades reports of the Anti-Defamation League have served as background material for The Times as well as countless other journalists, legislators and the public. Where your editorial goes astray is imputing to the Anti-Defamation League the collecting of information on groups such as the NAACP, television station KQED, Times correspondent Scott Kraft, et al. In the frenzy to report allegations and information from an affidavit made public by the San Francisco district attorney's office, few reporters have bothered to distinguish between material from the files of the Anti-Defamation League and that taken from the homes of Roy Bullock and Tom Gerard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1988
In response to your article "South Africa Lures Tourists Amid Racial Unrest," by Scott Kraft, Part I, Sept. 7: Jerry and Kay Kushins' friends in Walnut Creek may call them brave for visiting South Africa, but I find their actions indefensible and morally reprehensible. While they indulge themselves with fine meals and beautiful views of the Indian Ocean, their dollars are put to work propping up South Africa's notorious brand of legally institutionalized racism. They are quoted as saying that they didn't think they "really knew what apartheid was" prior to their trip.
MAGAZINE
April 5, 1992
Scott Kraft's article ("Africa's Death Sentence," March 1) on AIDS in Zimbabwe deals with two different subjects that he unfortunately intertwines. The topic of women being forced into subservience to men is valid but should be a story unto itself. AIDS is caused by a virus, an infectious agent. Kraft falls into a common trap when he describes women and children as innocent victims of AIDS and men as villainous carriers of the virus. He says intravenous drug use and homosexuality account for less than 1% of AIDS cases in Africa, and that "for most mothers and fathers, the child's diagnosis is the first time they learn their own fate."
MAGAZINE
October 9, 2005
Congratulations on the eclectic, splendid Sept. 11 issue. Though I have been a subscriber for more than 20 years, I was always enchanted with the New York Times Magazine. For a long time I've been frustrated by the frothy, usually L.A.-obsessed content of your magazine, and I've been meaning to write to you. But now I can write with praise. The Sept. 11 cover story on South Africa ("After the Fire," by Scott Kraft) is an in-depth article with profound and fascinating significance.
MAGAZINE
September 11, 2005 | Scott Kraft, Scott Kraft is the national editor of The Times and was the paper's South Africa bureau chief between 1988 and 1993.
I expected to find a family in ruins. My small car crunched up the gravel road past acres of fruit trees to Hennie and Evelynne Durr's hilltop farm home, an hour outside of Cape Town. During my last visit, in 1989, the Durrs had been gripped by a conflict that echoed the battles of American families during Vietnam and the Civil Rights era.
NEWS
October 30, 1997
Scott Kraft, a veteran reporter and deputy foreign editor of the Los Angeles Times, has been named national editor of the paper, Editor Michael Parks announced Wednesday. Kraft will succeed Norman C. "Mike" Miller, who has directed The Times' national coverage since 1983. Miller helped to lead many changes in that coverage, including the expansion of the paper's Washington bureau, widely regarded as among the most influential in the nation. He will retire Friday.
OPINION
May 29, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, Scott Kraft, The Times bureau chief in Paris, interviewed Balladur in his office
When Jacques Chirac led the Gaullist conservatives to an overwhelming victory in national elections last year, he had his eye on a bigger prize--the presidency. Unfortunately, the sitting president, Francois Mitterrand, planned to keep the job until his term expired in 1995. So the conservatives devised a cunning, though politically risky strategy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1993
Your editorial "A Line Never to Be Crossed" (April 14) with regard to the Anti-Defamation League was, for the most part, right on target. As you correctly noted, "it is no surprise that the ADL has kept close tabs on individuals and groups of all stripes that trade in hate or violence. . . ." Indeed, for decades reports of the Anti-Defamation League have served as background material for The Times as well as countless other journalists, legislators and the public. Where your editorial goes astray is imputing to the Anti-Defamation League the collecting of information on groups such as the NAACP, television station KQED, Times correspondent Scott Kraft, et al. In the frenzy to report allegations and information from an affidavit made public by the San Francisco district attorney's office, few reporters have bothered to distinguish between material from the files of the Anti-Defamation League and that taken from the homes of Roy Bullock and Tom Gerard.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police on Thursday served search warrants on the Anti-Defamation League here and in Los Angeles, seizing evidence of a nationwide intelligence network accused of keeping files on more than 950 political groups, newspapers and labor unions and as many as 12,000 people.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police on Thursday served search warrants on the Anti-Defamation League here and in Los Angeles, seizing evidence of a nationwide intelligence network accused of keeping files on more than 950 political groups, newspapers and labor unions and as many as 12,000 people.
NEWS
March 27, 2014
As deputy managing editor, Scott Kraft is responsible for the front page, the Column One feature and major investigative, explanatory and narrative reporting projects. During more than two decades at The Times, Kraft has been a national and foreign correspondent as well as a news department head. He joined the paper as a staff writer in its Chicago bureau and later was bureau chief in Nairobi, Johannesburg and Paris. He covered the release of Nelson Mandela and the end of apartheid and the ill-fated U.S. military mission in Somalia, among other major stories.
MAGAZINE
November 29, 1992
"Winnie Mandela Woos the Masses" (by Scott Kraft, Oct. 25) portrays Winnie and Nelson Mandela as riding in separate cars on the same train, Nelson being the statesman and Winnie the warrior. In the 1960s, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. were also moving toward the same goal, but one was a a warrior and the other a statesman. As long as there is racism, oppression, apartheid and any other form of racial injustice in the world, warriors and statesmen are needed to fight it. Today, more than ever, we need more Martin Luther Kings and Malcolm Xs, more Nelson and Winnie Mandelas.
MAGAZINE
April 5, 1992
Scott Kraft's article ("Africa's Death Sentence," March 1) on AIDS in Zimbabwe deals with two different subjects that he unfortunately intertwines. The topic of women being forced into subservience to men is valid but should be a story unto itself. AIDS is caused by a virus, an infectious agent. Kraft falls into a common trap when he describes women and children as innocent victims of AIDS and men as villainous carriers of the virus. He says intravenous drug use and homosexuality account for less than 1% of AIDS cases in Africa, and that "for most mothers and fathers, the child's diagnosis is the first time they learn their own fate."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|