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Scott Lamberth

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BUSINESS
January 31, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI and GEORGE FRANK, Times Staff Writers
Whittaker Corp., a Los Angeles defense contractor, said Monday that it expects to be criminally charged by the federal government in connection with payments made by employees to a government official. In a terse announcement, the company said that last Friday Justice Department attorneys presented evidence to Whittaker indicating that certain employees and consultants "caused money to be paid to a government employee in connection with certain government contracts in violation of law."
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BUSINESS
January 31, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI and GEORGE FRANK, Times Staff Writers
Whittaker Corp., a Los Angeles defense contractor, said Monday that it expects to be criminally charged by the federal government in connection with payments made by employees to a government official. In a terse announcement, the company said that last Friday Justice Department attorneys presented evidence to Whittaker indicating that certain employees and consultants "caused money to be paid to a government employee in connection with certain government contracts in violation of law."
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NEWS
June 30, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Operation Ill Wind blew like a hurricane through the homes and offices of Pentagon and defense industry officials over the past two weeks as FBI agents began seizing evidence of what they believe is massive corruption in the $150-billion-a-year Defense Department weapons-buying system. And the investigation is rapidly accumulating a cast of characters almost as vast and varied as the mountains of documents swept up by the FBI.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Operation Ill Wind blew like a hurricane through the homes and offices of Pentagon and defense industry officials over the past two weeks as FBI agents began seizing evidence of what they believe is massive corruption in the $150-billion-a-year Defense Department weapons-buying system. And the investigation is rapidly accumulating a cast of characters almost as vast and varied as the mountains of documents swept up by the FBI.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
Two former executives of Norden Systems today admitted that they conspired to obtain confidential Defense Department bid information on a lucrative Marine Corps contract. James E. Rapinac, a former senior vice president, and C. J. Richardson, a former marketing official, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to defraud the government and convert government property.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
A subsidiary of Los Angeles-based Whittaker Corp. and two former executives pleaded guilty today to charges they bribed a Marine Corps contracting official to increase the value of Pentagon electronic contracts their company obtained. Whittaker Command and Control Systems pleaded guilty to conspiracy to defraud the government and two counts of bribing former Marine Corps official Jack Sherman with nearly $75,000 between 1982 and 1988. The Whittaker subsidiary agreed to pay $3.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
A subsidiary of Los Angeles-based Whittaker Corp., two of its former executives and a San Diego defense consultant pleaded guilty Tuesday to bribing a Marine Corps procurement official to pad the firm's electronic contracts with the Pentagon. In addition, a federal grand jury in Alexandria, Va., on Tuesday indicted Washington defense consultant Thomas E. Muldoon and former Whittaker official Leonard L. Ingram on bribery, fraud and conspiracy charges in connection with the scheme.
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