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Scott Lancaster Mills Atha

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BUSINESS
March 20, 1988
As a member of the Los Angeles advertising community, I take exception to some of Richard Kelly's comments. That Kelly finds it "laughable" that Los Angeles is portrayed as a world-class ad center and that "there simply isn't the resources and professionalism in Los Angeles to the extent that there is in New York" most likely is not the reason why Scali, McCabe couldn't cut it in Los Angeles. The resources are available. Further, to say that Los Angeles lacks professionalism conveys a blatant misunderstanding of the word.
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BUSINESS
September 5, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yet another Los Angeles advertising agency has closed its doors. But this time, there may be a happy ending. The feisty but struggling agency Scott Lancaster Mills Atha, best known for creating ads for toy companies, will close later this month. But its presence will hardly disappear from the Los Angeles advertising scene.
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BUSINESS
September 5, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yet another Los Angeles advertising agency has closed its doors. But this time, there may be a happy ending. The feisty but struggling agency Scott Lancaster Mills Atha, best known for creating ads for toy companies, will close later this month. But its presence will hardly disappear from the Los Angeles advertising scene.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1988
As a member of the Los Angeles advertising community, I take exception to some of Richard Kelly's comments. That Kelly finds it "laughable" that Los Angeles is portrayed as a world-class ad center and that "there simply isn't the resources and professionalism in Los Angeles to the extent that there is in New York" most likely is not the reason why Scali, McCabe couldn't cut it in Los Angeles. The resources are available. Further, to say that Los Angeles lacks professionalism conveys a blatant misunderstanding of the word.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1996
Steve Scott, 68, an advertising executive who specialized in marketing toys. Scott began working part time at Buchanan & Co. while a student at UCLA and joined the agency when he graduated. After stints with May Co., Crane Co. and West Associates, Scott started his own advertising firm, Steve Scott & Associates. Over the years, the firm evolved by joining with others into what became Scott Lancaster Mills Atha. Scott retired in 1990, when the agency was sold to Evans Advertising.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1985 | VICTORIA McCARGAR
Many an adult will fondly remember spending Saturday afternoons hunched over a slot car track, watching miniature cars careen around a plastic road course. Those slot car drivers of the 1960s and 1970s will also remember the name Aurora, whose AFX-model slot cars were one of the leaders in the market. It is a name, however, that hasn't been heard for the last few years as Aurora developed financial troubles, changed hands a couple of times and eventually withdrew from the market. But Tomy Corp.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Any time New York cosmetics giant Estee Lauder has wanted advertisements over the past 20 years, it has looked across town to the same sprawling Manhattan ad agency. Now, it is also looking across the country. Several months ago, executives from the company's Aramis division edged away from the New York ad firm AC&R. Instead, the company is looking to the Los Angeles ad firm Keye/Donna/Pearlstein to create ads for New West, a line of men's skin care products.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When out-of-town agencies open branches in Los Angeles, most competitors welcome them with Bronx cheers--at best. Local advertisers often respond with equal enthusiasm. But lured by the prospects of fat ad revenues, agencies from New York, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco and, most recently, Seattle have all amassed here to grab the mythical brass ring. Some have closed within just a few years. Others remain--despite years of losses--to impress big East Coast clients. A few have flourished.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Joe Eisaman isn't shy to admit it. He's on the prowl to merge his agency with a smaller ad firm. "It might never have happened in better times," said Eisaman, whose Los Angeles agency Eisaman, Johns & Laws Advertising, creates ads for Neutrogena and Price Pfister. "But rather than everyone hunkering down, I see the opportunity for two small agencies to both get stronger by merging." By one estimate, nearly half of the 250 or so agencies in the Los Angeles area are scouting around for partners.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
It's tough enough to be creative in good times. Now, with the Persian Gulf War raging, those who create ads face a host of roadblocks in developing new ads--and airing current ones. "We're closely looking at all creative work to see if any of it might not match the mood of the country," said Steve Hayden, chairman and chief creative officer at the ad firm BBDO/Los Angeles. "Every piece of copy going out of here we look at in context of the war."
BUSINESS
November 17, 1989 | JANE APPLEGATE
When you own a small business, you not only run the business, you are the business. And because most business owners can't afford a full-time public relations person, the owner usually serves as the company spokesperson. But what if you are shy in public and feel uncomfortable when asked to answer questions or speak to groups? Do you stay awake all night before you have to make a presentation? Do your palms sweat? Does your throat tighten before a speech?
BUSINESS
May 29, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ
The ad campaign launched by the Seven-Up Co. 2 1/2 years ago could have been called childish, and the soft-drink firm would have been the first to agree. Children 6 to 12 were the target of a 7-Up television commercial that featured an animated character named Dot--modeled after the red circle found on the soda label--who played baseball with peas and carrot sticks inside a refrigerator. "We've met with a lot of success," said marketing chief Russ Klein of the Dot campaign.
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