Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScott Letellier
IN THE NEWS

Scott Letellier

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 15, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY
Scott LeTellier, a Newport Beach lawyer, will be named president of the organizing committee for soccer's 1994 World Cup, the first one ever awarded to the United States, a source said Tuesday. A formal announcement will be made Monday in a U.S. Soccer Federation meeting at Seattle. LeTellier, 38, served as outside legal counsel for the bid committee, which was selected to stage the 1994 World Cup last July 4 by the international soccer federation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 12, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite speculation in Europe that the 1994 World Cup might be moved from the United States, the top official of the U.S. Organizing Committee reaffirmed Wednesday that the world's biggest sporting event will be held in this country as scheduled. Committee President Scott LeTellier said: "There is no truth to the reports whatsoever. There is no basis in fact. It's so far-fetched."
Advertisement
SPORTS
July 12, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite speculation in Europe that the 1994 World Cup might be moved from the United States, the top official of the U.S. Organizing Committee reaffirmed Wednesday that the world's biggest sporting event will be held in this country as scheduled. Committee President Scott LeTellier said: "There is no truth to the reports whatsoever. There is no basis in fact. It's so far-fetched."
SPORTS
November 15, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the United States defeats Trinidad and Tobago Sunday at Port of Spain, Trinidad, thereby earning a berth in the World Cup for the first time in 40 years, $1.4 million would automatically be added to the U.S. Soccer Federation's coffers. For the financially strapped organization, that is incentive enough to do everything possible to guarantee a victory. Although that may be the bottom line, the rewards of a victory would not stop there.
SPORTS
November 15, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the United States defeats Trinidad and Tobago Sunday at Port of Spain, Trinidad, thereby earning a berth in the World Cup for the first time in 40 years, $1.4 million would automatically be added to the U.S. Soccer Federation's coffers. For the financially strapped organization, that is incentive enough to do everything possible to guarantee a victory. Although that may be the bottom line, the rewards of a victory would not stop there.
SPORTS
June 19, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Several games may be played indoors at the 1994 World Cup soccer finals in the United States, Scott LeTellier, chief operating officer of the 1994 finals, said today. LeTellier said FIFA, the world governing body of soccer, had agreed to consider matches at covered dome stadiums used for major baseball and football games. None of the stadiums has a grass surface, but LeTellier said at a news conference: "We have evidence that it will not be a problem to grow grass indoors."
SPORTS
June 20, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY
With 31 stadiums in 27 U.S. cities already expressing interest in playing host to World Cup soccer games in 1994, the organizing committee announced Tuesday that the list of potential sites could grow with the International Federation of Assn. Football's decision to consider domed stadiums. Ross Berlin, vice president in charge of venues for World Cup USA 1994, said officials from the Silverdome in Pontiac, Mich.
SPORTS
October 11, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Wednesday's announcement that Alan Rothenberg will become chairman of the board and Chuck Cale chief executive officer, the three most influential positions on the organizing committee for the 1994 World Cup of soccer have been filled by Southern California lawyers who are veterans of the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee. So, it was no surprise when the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1990 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Tom Bradley said Wednesday, the day after the Raiders agreed to keep playing football in Los Angeles, that the city's next top sports priority is to secure the finals of the 1994 World Cup.
SPORTS
October 19, 1994 | From Associated Press
The 1994 World Cup finished with a profit of about $50 million and head U.S. organizer Alan Rothenberg will get a $3-million bonus, organizers announced Tuesday. At the start of 1994, Rothenberg estimated a profit of $20 million. It increased because security costs were lower than forecast. "We had a lot of contingencies, and thank God we did not have to spend them," Rothenberg said. Peter Ueberroth, head of the U.S.
SPORTS
February 15, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY
Scott LeTellier, a Newport Beach lawyer, will be named president of the organizing committee for soccer's 1994 World Cup, the first one ever awarded to the United States, a source said Tuesday. A formal announcement will be made Monday in a U.S. Soccer Federation meeting at Seattle. LeTellier, 38, served as outside legal counsel for the bid committee, which was selected to stage the 1994 World Cup last July 4 by the international soccer federation.
SPORTS
May 14, 1994 | MAL FLORENCE
Jim Litke of the Associated Press doubts that soccer will catch on as a popular sport in the United States. "Five weeks before the World Cup arrives on these shores, there is little to suggest that the same game Americans ranked behind log rolling in a survey last year has a better foothold now than it did then," he wrote. Scott LeTellier, chief operating officer for World Cup USA 1994, has a different opinion.
SPORTS
July 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
American organizers of the 1994 World Cup got a cool, almost hostile reception from the international media today when they held a news conference to discuss plans for the tournament. Several hundred journalists gathered to hear Scott LeTellier, president of the World Cup '94 Organizing Committee; Werner Fricker, its chairman and president of the U.S. Soccer Federation, and Henry A. Kissinger, vice chairman of the organizing committee.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|