Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScott Mcclellan
IN THE NEWS

Scott Mcclellan

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2008 | Scott Lindlaw, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO -- On his book-promotion stopover here, former White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan was squired around by a "literary escort," a pleasant woman named Naomi who drives visiting authors to their speaking engagements in a blue convertible. There were no motorcades, no street closures, no Secret Service. McClellan slept at a Marriott Hotel, a couple of notches down from the Beverly Wilshire, where he, President Bush and the rest of the White House entourage stayed when in Southern California.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
A man has been hospitalized following an officer-involved shooting Tuesday morning in a residential neighborhood in Irvine, police said. The man's condition was not known. The shooting in the 1100 block of Crested Bird occurred at about 10:40 a.m., said Sgt. Scott McClellan with the Irvine Police Department. No officers were injured in the shooting, McClellan said. There was no additional information on the man who was shot or what prompted the incident. ALSO: Rick Caruso gets permit to moor mega-yacht in Newport Beach Infant who drowned in a bathtub is identified; autopsy pending Rim fire: Pot-growing operation near Yosemite may have sparked blaze adolfo.flores@latimes.com Follow Adolfo Flores on Twitter . 
Advertisement
NATIONAL
June 21, 2003 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
New White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan will begin his job with one advantage over Ari Fleischer, his predecessor -- he won't need to demonstrate his loyalty to President Bush. Fleischer was one of the exceptions among the White House inner circle -- a non-Texan who, when he joined Bush's 2000 presidential campaign, had not previously worked for the candidate.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2008 | Scott Lindlaw, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO -- On his book-promotion stopover here, former White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan was squired around by a "literary escort," a pleasant woman named Naomi who drives visiting authors to their speaking engagements in a blue convertible. There were no motorcades, no street closures, no Secret Service. McClellan slept at a Marriott Hotel, a couple of notches down from the Beverly Wilshire, where he, President Bush and the rest of the White House entourage stayed when in Southern California.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2008 | From the Associated Press
President Bush's former spokesman, Scott McClellan, will testify before the House Judiciary Committee on June 20 about whether Vice President Dick Cheney ordered him to make misleading public statements about the leaking of CIA agent Valerie Plame's identity in an effort to undercut her husband's criticism of the Iraq war. In his new book, McClellan said he was misled by others, possibly including Cheney, about the role of Cheney's chief of staff at the time, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
A man has been hospitalized following an officer-involved shooting Tuesday morning in a residential neighborhood in Irvine, police said. The man's condition was not known. The shooting in the 1100 block of Crested Bird occurred at about 10:40 a.m., said Sgt. Scott McClellan with the Irvine Police Department. No officers were injured in the shooting, McClellan said. There was no additional information on the man who was shot or what prompted the incident. ALSO: Rick Caruso gets permit to moor mega-yacht in Newport Beach Infant who drowned in a bathtub is identified; autopsy pending Rim fire: Pot-growing operation near Yosemite may have sparked blaze adolfo.flores@latimes.com Follow Adolfo Flores on Twitter . 
OPINION
April 21, 2006
Re "Rove's Role Cut and McClellan Out in Shake-Up," April 20 Bravo to the president's new chief of staff, Josh Bolten, for getting rid of White House press secretary Scott McClellan. McClellan had an extremely difficult job trying to spin all the lies and deceit on behalf of the president and the scoundrels who surround him. Now if Bolten can just get rid of Dick Cheney, Michael Chertoff, Karl Rove, Donald Rumsfeld, etc., the president's ratings might improve and the GOP might have a chance come November.
OPINION
January 21, 2006
Re "U.S. Verifies Bin Laden Tape, Calls His Offer of a Truce a Ploy," Jan. 20 After being silent for more than one year, Osama bin Laden states that he is planning an attack against the United States. Is it possible that he has been encouraged by the politicians and individuals who are against the war in Iraq, the Patriot Act and the eavesdropping on suspect international communications that may or may not include individuals living in the United States? W.R. ZELENKA Granada Hills White House spokesman Scott McClellan, speaking for President Bush: "The terrorists started this war, but we will end it at a time and place of our choosing."
NATIONAL
June 21, 2008 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Former White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan, testifying before the House Judiciary Committee on Friday, said he was suspicious of I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby's denial that he had leaked the name of a CIA agent but had no choice but to go along with it. McClellan's testimony came shortly after his author's tour for "What Happened: Inside the Bush White House and Washington's Culture of Deception," the memoir that created a stir in the capital when it was published last month.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2008
IN THE midst of his excellent review of Scott McClellan's new book ["Another Round of Fire From a Bush Defector," May 30], Tim Rutten offers a defense of the media after 9/11 that is at least as disturbing as McClellan's revelations about White House propaganda and deception. Rutten claims that in the wake of the wrenching trauma of 9/11, the press felt "the moral obligation to demonstrate solidarity with a country under deadly attack," and to have not given the administration the benefit of the doubt "would have been mindlessly adversarial."
NATIONAL
June 21, 2008 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Former White House Press Secretary Scott McClellan, testifying before the House Judiciary Committee on Friday, said he was suspicious of I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby's denial that he had leaked the name of a CIA agent but had no choice but to go along with it. McClellan's testimony came shortly after his author's tour for "What Happened: Inside the Bush White House and Washington's Culture of Deception," the memoir that created a stir in the capital when it was published last month.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2008 | From the Associated Press
President Bush's former spokesman, Scott McClellan, will testify before the House Judiciary Committee on June 20 about whether Vice President Dick Cheney ordered him to make misleading public statements about the leaking of CIA agent Valerie Plame's identity in an effort to undercut her husband's criticism of the Iraq war. In his new book, McClellan said he was misled by others, possibly including Cheney, about the role of Cheney's chief of staff at the time, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby.
OPINION
June 7, 2008 | Mark Dery, Mark Dery is a cultural critic who teaches in the department of journalism at New York University.
Scott McClellan is having a "Matrix" moment -- the moment when you wake up, with a jolt, from the reassuring fictions of the media dream world to the face-slapping reality of unspun fact. In "The Matrix," Laurence Fishburne parts the veil of illusion -- the computer-generated simulation that humanity experiences as reality -- to reveal the movie's post-apocalyptic world as an irradiated slag heap.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2008
IN THE midst of his excellent review of Scott McClellan's new book ["Another Round of Fire From a Bush Defector," May 30], Tim Rutten offers a defense of the media after 9/11 that is at least as disturbing as McClellan's revelations about White House propaganda and deception. Rutten claims that in the wake of the wrenching trauma of 9/11, the press felt "the moral obligation to demonstrate solidarity with a country under deadly attack," and to have not given the administration the benefit of the doubt "would have been mindlessly adversarial."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
WHATEVER qualities George W. Bush brought to the presidency, the ability to inspire loyalty in others obviously was not among them. The evidence seems to suggest, in fact, that you'd probably have to go back to the Borgia court to find anything close to the miasma of feral self-interest that must hang in the air during one of this administration's staff or cabinet meetings. If you worked with this crew, you'd want to wear a Kevlar undershirt to the office. "What Happened: Inside the Bush White House and Washington's Culture of Deception" by Scott McClellan -- the second of Bush's four press secretaries -- is the latest tell-all sensation in a series that actually began during the president's first term.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2008 | James Gerstenzang and Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writers
For years here and in Texas, Scott McClellan was the consummate loyalist, exhibiting faithful, unquestioning devotion to his boss, George W. Bush. As White House press secretary, he scrappily presented the administration's talking points on everything from domestic policy to the Iraq war. No longer.
OPINION
June 7, 2008 | Mark Dery, Mark Dery is a cultural critic who teaches in the department of journalism at New York University.
Scott McClellan is having a "Matrix" moment -- the moment when you wake up, with a jolt, from the reassuring fictions of the media dream world to the face-slapping reality of unspun fact. In "The Matrix," Laurence Fishburne parts the veil of illusion -- the computer-generated simulation that humanity experiences as reality -- to reveal the movie's post-apocalyptic world as an irradiated slag heap.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2008 | James Gerstenzang and Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writers
For years here and in Texas, Scott McClellan was the consummate loyalist, exhibiting faithful, unquestioning devotion to his boss, George W. Bush. As White House press secretary, he scrappily presented the administration's talking points on everything from domestic policy to the Iraq war. No longer.
OPINION
April 21, 2006
Re "Rove's Role Cut and McClellan Out in Shake-Up," April 20 Bravo to the president's new chief of staff, Josh Bolten, for getting rid of White House press secretary Scott McClellan. McClellan had an extremely difficult job trying to spin all the lies and deceit on behalf of the president and the scoundrels who surround him. Now if Bolten can just get rid of Dick Cheney, Michael Chertoff, Karl Rove, Donald Rumsfeld, etc., the president's ratings might improve and the GOP might have a chance come November.
NATIONAL
April 20, 2006 | Tom Hamburger, Richard Simon and Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writers
Moving to reinvigorate his presidency and recover from low public approval ratings, President Bush on Wednesday reduced the official role that Karl Rove, his chief political strategist, will play in setting policy, and accepted the resignation of spokesman Scott McClellan. The moves were part of an effort by Bush's new chief of staff, Joshua B. Bolten, to energize an administration that has faced bad news from Iraq and seen a number of second-term initiatives stall.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|