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Scott Ritter

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NEWS
July 30, 2000 | From Reuters
Former U.N. weapons inspector Scott Ritter, once accused by Iraq of spying for the United States, returned Saturday to film a documentary about weapons sites and the impact of U.N. sanctions. Ritter said on arrival in Baghdad that he hoped that his mission can help break the impasse between Iraq and the United Nations over the suspended inspections program and Iraq's allegedly continuing efforts to produce weapons of mass destruction.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2003 | Zeke Minaya, Times Staff Writer
The prospect of war with Iraq attracted a diverse, standing-room-only crowd to a Chapman University lecture hall Tuesday evening to hear a former a U.N. weapons inspector criticize the Bush administration's failed diplomacy. Scott Ritter, who worked as a U.N. arms inspector in Iraq from 1991 to 1998, spoke briefly before the packed audience of more than 350 people at the George Bush Conference Center, named for the first President Bush, then took questions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000
Re "We Must Break Out of the Failed 'Saddam Trap,' " Commentary, Sept. 5: In arguing for an end to crippling sanctions, Scott Ritter states that "Iraq no longer possesses meaningful quantities of weapons of mass destruction or the means to produce such weapons." But Khidhir Hamza, the highest-ranking scientist ever to defect from that country, has said that if Iraq were able to buy fissile material, an atomic bomb could be made in two to six months. While the Clinton administration has shown little concern for the humanitarian tragedy brought on by sanctions, those who are concerned must also realize that ending sanctions would provide Saddam Hussein with the cash needed to build the bomb.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2002 | Hilary E. MacGregor, Times Staff Writer
More than 100 Hollywood actors, producers and directors will out themselves today as antiwar activists. Mike Farrell, Alfre Woodard, Ed Begley Jr., Tony Shalhoub and others will hold a news conference at 10 a.m. at Les Deux Cafes in Hollywood to issue a statement protesting the costs and risks of going to war with Iraq.
OPINION
August 30, 1998 | JONATHAN B. TUCKER, Jonathan B. Tucker directs the Chemical and Biological Weapons Nonproliferation Project at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. He served on an UNSCOM biological weapons inspection team in Iraq in February 1995
The decision by senior U.N. inspector Scott Ritter to resign reflects a growing sense of frustration and bitterness among the men and women from several countries working to disarm Iraq of its most dangerous weapons. They feel abandoned by the international community, which is suffering from "crisis fatigue." With intrusive inspections in abeyance, Baghdad may now rebuild its deadly arsenal, nullifying the accomplishments of the past seven years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2002 | Hilary E. MacGregor, Times Staff Writer
More than 100 Hollywood actors, producers and directors will out themselves today as antiwar activists. Mike Farrell, Alfre Woodard, Ed Begley Jr., Tony Shalhoub and others will hold a news conference at 10 a.m. at Les Deux Cafes in Hollywood to issue a statement protesting the costs and risks of going to war with Iraq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2003 | Zeke Minaya, Times Staff Writer
The prospect of war with Iraq attracted a diverse, standing-room-only crowd to a Chapman University lecture hall Tuesday evening to hear a former a U.N. weapons inspector criticize the Bush administration's failed diplomacy. Scott Ritter, who worked as a U.N. arms inspector in Iraq from 1991 to 1998, spoke briefly before the packed audience of more than 350 people at the George Bush Conference Center, named for the first President Bush, then took questions.
NEWS
August 27, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the most senior U.N. weapons inspectors resigned Wednesday after charging that the United States and U.N. officials have opted to "surrender to the Iraqi leadership" in the ongoing confrontation with Baghdad. The resignation of Scott Ritter, a retired U.S.
NEWS
September 4, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. weapons inspectors were poised last month to uncover concealed Iraqi ballistic missile components and other contraband but were thwarted by the Clinton administration, former inspector Scott Ritter told members of Congress on Thursday. Ritter, who resigned last week, said the inspectors had come up with "hard evidence" on where to find the missile parts and locate documents showing how Baghdad hid other weapons of mass destruction. But he said the raid, scheduled for Aug.
WORLD
September 16, 2002 | JOHANNA NEUMAN and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When former United Nations arms inspector Scott Ritter got home from Baghdad Tuesday night, he was greeted by a flood of e-mail messages. Some applauded his courage in standing up to the Bush administration's war rhetoric by telling Iraq's National Assembly that the U.S. had no "hard facts" that Baghdad possesses weapons of mass destruction. Others, saying he'd been brainwashed by President Saddam Hussein, suggested that he turn in his U.S. passport and move to Iraq.
BOOKS
November 3, 2002 | Andrew Cockburn, Andrew Cockburn is the co-author of "Out of the Ashes: The Resurrection of Saddam Hussein."
Faced with Saddam Hussein, the former teenage hit man from Tikrit, our government appears to feel the need to talk as tough as any Tikriti.
WORLD
September 16, 2002 | JOHANNA NEUMAN and BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When former United Nations arms inspector Scott Ritter got home from Baghdad Tuesday night, he was greeted by a flood of e-mail messages. Some applauded his courage in standing up to the Bush administration's war rhetoric by telling Iraq's National Assembly that the U.S. had no "hard facts" that Baghdad possesses weapons of mass destruction. Others, saying he'd been brainwashed by President Saddam Hussein, suggested that he turn in his U.S. passport and move to Iraq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000
Re "We Must Break Out of the Failed 'Saddam Trap,' " Commentary, Sept. 5: In arguing for an end to crippling sanctions, Scott Ritter states that "Iraq no longer possesses meaningful quantities of weapons of mass destruction or the means to produce such weapons." But Khidhir Hamza, the highest-ranking scientist ever to defect from that country, has said that if Iraq were able to buy fissile material, an atomic bomb could be made in two to six months. While the Clinton administration has shown little concern for the humanitarian tragedy brought on by sanctions, those who are concerned must also realize that ending sanctions would provide Saddam Hussein with the cash needed to build the bomb.
NEWS
July 30, 2000 | From Reuters
Former U.N. weapons inspector Scott Ritter, once accused by Iraq of spying for the United States, returned Saturday to film a documentary about weapons sites and the impact of U.N. sanctions. Ritter said on arrival in Baghdad that he hoped that his mission can help break the impasse between Iraq and the United Nations over the suspended inspections program and Iraq's allegedly continuing efforts to produce weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
September 4, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. weapons inspectors were poised last month to uncover concealed Iraqi ballistic missile components and other contraband but were thwarted by the Clinton administration, former inspector Scott Ritter told members of Congress on Thursday. Ritter, who resigned last week, said the inspectors had come up with "hard evidence" on where to find the missile parts and locate documents showing how Baghdad hid other weapons of mass destruction. But he said the raid, scheduled for Aug.
OPINION
August 30, 1998 | JONATHAN B. TUCKER, Jonathan B. Tucker directs the Chemical and Biological Weapons Nonproliferation Project at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. He served on an UNSCOM biological weapons inspection team in Iraq in February 1995
The decision by senior U.N. inspector Scott Ritter to resign reflects a growing sense of frustration and bitterness among the men and women from several countries working to disarm Iraq of its most dangerous weapons. They feel abandoned by the international community, which is suffering from "crisis fatigue." With intrusive inspections in abeyance, Baghdad may now rebuild its deadly arsenal, nullifying the accomplishments of the past seven years.
BOOKS
November 3, 2002 | Andrew Cockburn, Andrew Cockburn is the co-author of "Out of the Ashes: The Resurrection of Saddam Hussein."
Faced with Saddam Hussein, the former teenage hit man from Tikrit, our government appears to feel the need to talk as tough as any Tikriti.
NEWS
October 2, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Richard Butler, chief U.N. weapons inspector for Iraq, has chastised U.S. arms expert Scott Ritter for making public confidential information about Iraq's weapons capabilities. Butler wrote a letter to the former U.S. Marine telling him to stop revealing confidential information in violation of his contract with the United Nations. Since he resigned from the weapons inspection team Aug.
NEWS
August 27, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the most senior U.N. weapons inspectors resigned Wednesday after charging that the United States and U.N. officials have opted to "surrender to the Iraqi leadership" in the ongoing confrontation with Baghdad. The resignation of Scott Ritter, a retired U.S.
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