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Scott Rosenberg

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NEWS
April 14, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case of life imitating art, a barroom brawl between local residents and Hollywood actors here to film a movie called "Domestic Disturbances" sent one of the performers back home with slash wounds to his head, throat and arm. Steve Buscemi, 43, the versatile character actor known for his roles in "Reservoir Dogs" and "Fargo," was treated at a local hospital and then left for New York after he was allegedly attacked early Thursday by a knife-wielding 21-year-old Wilmington man.
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NEWS
April 14, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case of life imitating art, a barroom brawl between local residents and Hollywood actors here to film a movie called "Domestic Disturbances" sent one of the performers back home with slash wounds to his head, throat and arm. Steve Buscemi, 43, the versatile character actor known for his roles in "Reservoir Dogs" and "Fargo," was treated at a local hospital and then left for New York after he was allegedly attacked early Thursday by a knife-wielding 21-year-old Wilmington man.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Winners of the 34th annual Samuel Goldwyn/UCLA Writing Awards picked up their prizes Monday afternoon at a ceremony at UCLA. Jeffrey Bell won the $5,000 first prize for his script "Radio Inside." Karen Joy Fowler received the $2,500 second prize for "920 China Street" and the $1,000 third prize went to Scott Rosenberg for "Five O'Clock Shadow." Judges were producer-director James Brooks, producer Sherry Lansing and Dawn Steel, president of Columbia Pictures.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Merger Unites Comic Books and Video Games: Comic book publisher Malibu Graphics and video game developer Acme Interactive, both of Westlake Village, have merged to form Malibu Comics Entertainment Inc., the privately held companies announced. The new company has already agreed to provide video game manufacturer Sega of America Inc. with new Sega-Genesis games based on characters from Malibu's "Ex-Mutants" and "Dinosaurs for Hire" comic books.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2003 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
If there's one thing critics have agreed on this year, it's that "Kangaroo Jack" -- made by Castle Rock and distributed by Warner Bros. -- is a forgettable movie. Although the movie has made $35 million over the last 10 days, reviewers have dismissed the film as a "witless escapade" and "a numskull comedy," with one depressed scribe saying that it "left me wanting to kill myself."
BUSINESS
April 8, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Well, a small Bay Area company that pioneered the now-widespread concept of online discussion communities, has been acquired by Salon.com, a leading Internet magazine. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Salon purchased the Sausalito-based company from Rosewood Stone Group, an investment firm headed by Bruce Katz, the founder of Rockport Shoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1998 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
Movies like David Nutter's "Disturbing Behavior," written by Scott Rosenberg, the author of last summer's worst movie, "Con Air," are the reason valet parking attendants in Beverly Hills leave scripts on the seats. They give hope. Conceived as an upside-down "Clockwork Orange," this howler of a horror movie is set in the picture-book Northwest town of Cradle Bay, where the high school is infested with a growing crowd of Stepford jocks and pom-pom girls with severe superiority complexes.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Microsoft Corp. on Wednesday settled a class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of thousands of Iowans who bought the company's programs between 1994 and 2006. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. The lawsuit sought more than $330 million from Microsoft for allegedly engaging in monopolistic and anti-competitive conduct that caused customers to pay more for software than they would have if there had been competition. Redmond, Wash.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2007 | Greg Braxton
Just a few weeks ago, Scott Rosenberg was a successful writer who wondered whether one of his pet projects, a TV series called "October Road," would ever see the light of day. Six episodes had been ordered by ABC and produced, but Rosenberg ("Con Air," "High Fidelity") had no indication that they would ever get on the air. Now, Rosenberg is beside himself. Almost without warning, "October Road" has landed a spot on the network, premiering this week.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1994 | L. D. STRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marvel Entertainment Group, the behemoth publisher of comic books, said Thursday that it has acquired Malibu Comics Entertainment Inc., the innovative West Coast Wunderkind of the comic book industry, creating an entity that will control 40% of the market. Details of the sale were not disclosed, though Malibu is to continue fully autonomous operations and remain in sole charge of its business ventures, including plans for feature movies, television cartoons and other merchandising.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN
Almost a year ago, Rob Liefeld, who drew Marvel Comics' "X-Force" series, defected from the mainstream publisher to upstart Malibu Graphics. His first post-Marvel creation was "Youngblood," a book full of hip, young superheroes (View, April 15). A premiere on Melrose Avenue and advance sales kicked off the first "Youngblood" comic book, which featured '90s-style characters such as speech writers, spin doctors and video trainers. Since then, Liefeld says, "Youngblood" T-shirts and jackets have been selling briskly, a line of toys will be out soon, and negotiations for a cartoon show are under way. The 25-year-old Fullerton resident has also created two series for Malibu Graphics, "Brigade" and "Supreme."
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