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Scott Rudin

ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | By David Ng
The Broadway revival of Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," starring Philip Seymour Hoffman and Andrew Garfield, has been a box-office hit, playing to near-capacity audiences since beginning performances at New York's Ethel Barrymore Theatre in February. So it should come as little surprise that the production will turn a profit. The show's producers - which include such powerhouses as Scott Rudin, Stuart Thompson and Jon B. Platt - announced Wednesday that "Salesman" will recoup its initial $3.1-million investment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1996 | Michelle Willens
Yes, that's the real Disney World you'll see for a couple of crucial scenes in "Marvin's Room." It's rather jolting at first to see Goofy et al in the midst of this movie about dying with dignity. In fact, it is the first time a Disney theme park has been used in a movie. But the filmmakers thought it was essential since the crux of the story takes place in Florida, and in the play on which the film is based, the family takes a needed break in the happiest of places.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
To hear almost-16 Cher Horowitz tell it, "I actually have a way normal life." True, her mom died during "routine liposuction," but she now lives happily with her fierce litigator father ("He gets paid $500 an hour to fight with people") in great Beverly Hills style. "Isn't my house classic?" she enthuses. "Its columns date back to 1972."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It's Hollywood's Night of Nights, but no one's picking Cameron Drake for the best actor Oscar. With competition like Paul Newman in "Coot," Clint Eastwood in "Codger," Michael Douglas in "Primary Urges" and Steven Seagal in "Snowball in Hell," how could they? But Drake's performance in "To Serve and Protect" as a gay soldier betrayed by a copy of "Beaches" discovered in his locker proves the surprise winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Thomas Horn, 14, was standing in the middle of a cocktail party populated with adults when director Brett Ratner walked over to the teenager to offer him a congratulatory pat on the shoulder. Days before the late December release of "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" - in which Horn stars as Oskar Schell, a boy struggling to come to grips with the loss of his father, played by Tom Hanks, in the Sept. 11 attacks - he and other cast members were being feted in the lobby of a building that houses the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Film Archive.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2003 | Gene Seymour, Newsday
"Marci X" purees all the public and political controversies swirling around hip-hop over the last decade and soft-serves the mixture in a drippy container. Despite the occasional topical reference to President Bush and Sen. Clinton, this movie is, like, so eight years ago, it isn't funny. Well, maybe sometimes it's funny. Screenwriter Paul Rudnick, better known to Premiere magazine readers as Libby Gelman-Waxner, always serves up a few zingers to keep you from drifting off.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1996
I would like to correct an omission of how an obscure play found its way to a motion picture ("A Place for Everyone in 'Marvin's Room,' " by Michele Willens, Dec. 15). Early in 1990, prior to the vision and persistence of Jane Rosenthal and of Scott Rudin (who found the play on my desk at Paramount Pictures), I was the first studio executive who said "yes" to the challenging material. Bonnie Palef, the original producer, initially brought the play to me because she knew of my knowledge and experience with theatrical properties.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1990 | David Pecchia \f7
Another You (Tri-Star). Shooting in New York. Richard Pryor and Gene Wilder are hoping their chemistry will hold up in yet another comedic pairing, this time with direction from Peter Bogdanovich. This one concerns the high jinks of a chronic liar and a habitual con man. Executive producer Ted Zachary. Producers Bogdanovich and Ziggy Steinberg. Screenwriter Steinberg. Bingo! (Barkoff Prods.). Shooting in Vancouver.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1991 | Nina J. Easton
A former child star now struggling to cope in an adult world? That's how audiences may see Eddie Murphy in his next movie, a comedy project now in development at Disney. Sources say Murphy is "very interested" in the story and awaiting a rewrite of the script before deciding whether to commit. But there's more than story to this story: Sources say Disney and Murphy are wrangling over his salary. Murphy, whose base salary on "Another 48 HRS."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1990 | From The Baltimore Sun
John Waters on Broadway? Waters' last project, "Hairspray," may yet squirt into another life form, having already logged time as a hit feature film, videocassette and record album. The film has been optioned as a Broadway musical. For an undisclosed sum, Hollywood producer Scott Rudin has obtained the rights to develop the film into a stage show, according to Robert Shaye, the president of New Line Cinema, which released the film. Plans are under way to put together a writing team.
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