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Scott Rudin

BUSINESS
November 1, 1991 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of rumor and speculation, Paramount Pictures late Thursday announced a further shake-up at its troubled motion picture division with the immediate departure of two senior executives. David Kirkpatrick, president of the Motion Pictures Group, and Gary Lucchesi, president of the Motion Picture Production Division, were "leaving their positions," effective immediately, Paramount said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By John Horn
Jon Stewart is leaving “The Daily Show” - for three months - to direct a movie. The political satirist and media critic will take a hiatus from his Comedy Central talk show this summer to make his feature directing debut, adapting Maziar Bahari's book “Then They Came for Me: A Family's Story of Love, Captivity and Survival.” The book, co-written with Aimee Molloy, chronicles Bahari's attempt to cover Iran's presidential elections in...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By David Ng
Brian Dennehy, who is currently in the Los Angeles production of "The Steward of Christendom" at the Mark Taper Forum, will reprise his recent Chicago performance in Eugene O'Neill's "The Iceman Cometh" for a six-week run at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in 2015. Scott Rudin is producing the revival production, which will run at BAM from Feb. 5, 2015 to March 15, 2015.  The production will also star Nathan Lane, who appeared alongside Dennehy in the Chicago production at the Goodman Theatre in 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | By David Ng
The Broadway revival of Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," starring Philip Seymour Hoffman and Andrew Garfield, has been a box-office hit, playing to near-capacity audiences since beginning performances at New York's Ethel Barrymore Theatre in February. So it should come as little surprise that the production will turn a profit. The show's producers - which include such powerhouses as Scott Rudin, Stuart Thompson and Jon B. Platt - announced Wednesday that "Salesman" will recoup its initial $3.1-million investment.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
To hear almost-16 Cher Horowitz tell it, "I actually have a way normal life." True, her mom died during "routine liposuction," but she now lives happily with her fierce litigator father ("He gets paid $500 an hour to fight with people") in great Beverly Hills style. "Isn't my house classic?" she enthuses. "Its columns date back to 1972."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By David Ng
A Catholic group is speaking out against a new Broadway play by Irish novelist Colm Toibin that offers an alternative interpretation of the life of the Virgin Mary. "The Testament of Mary," starring Fiona Shaw, began preview performances this week at the Walter Kerr Theatre.  The American Society for the Defense of Tradition, Family and Property published a lengthy statement on its website in which it called the play "blasphemous. " "The Irish writer gives free rein to his imagination when expressing his contempt for the Gospels, Christian tradition, and Mary Most Holy," the group wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Sony Pictures is close to a deal with bestselling author Michael Lewis to bring his latest book, a Wall Street drama and detective story, to the silver screen. “Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt,” recounts how a group of misfit stock brokers and techies worked to expose, and then fight back, against the tactics of high-frequency traders, or HFTs. The HFTs were able to exploit computer technology and millisecond advantages to make huge profits at the expense of regular investors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It's Hollywood's Night of Nights, but no one's picking Cameron Drake for the best actor Oscar. With competition like Paul Newman in "Coot," Clint Eastwood in "Codger," Michael Douglas in "Primary Urges" and Steven Seagal in "Snowball in Hell," how could they? But Drake's performance in "To Serve and Protect" as a gay soldier betrayed by a copy of "Beaches" discovered in his locker proves the surprise winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2003 | Gene Seymour, Newsday
"Marci X" purees all the public and political controversies swirling around hip-hop over the last decade and soft-serves the mixture in a drippy container. Despite the occasional topical reference to President Bush and Sen. Clinton, this movie is, like, so eight years ago, it isn't funny. Well, maybe sometimes it's funny. Screenwriter Paul Rudnick, better known to Premiere magazine readers as Libby Gelman-Waxner, always serves up a few zingers to keep you from drifting off.
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