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Scott Shannon

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989 | DENNIS McDOUGAL
There's a war going on each morning for the hearts and minds and ears of Southern California radio listeners. The battle cries go something like this: "Wake me up, Ken and Bob Company, wake me up. . . ." "Rick Dees in the morning! Live all over Southern California!" "This is Jay Thomas, Power 106, at 6:55 in the morning. . . ." "Hello, this is Mark and Kim along the KOST. . . ." "Pirate Radio. Welcome to the jungle. . . ." Nine million listeners populate the Los Angeles radio market.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If he were sleepwalking, Mark Shipper could easily stumble into the Pacific Ocean. But at 1:07 in the morning, his fax machine is whirring and his apartment is as Manhattan as Fifth Avenue. The TV is tuned to a New York news channel. The wall clock is set three hours ahead--to Eastern Daylight Time. The fax is bringing in New York's top morning news stories. All the while, Shipper's specially modified telephone is playing a New York radio station over a speaker phone.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pirate Radio, which swashbuckled onto the Southern California scene nearly two years ago amid much hoopla, high expectations and a $54-million price tag, sinks today. KQLZ-FM(100.3) was scheduled to switch formats at 6 this morning. The reason for the change was attributed to steadily plunging ratings. "We had a great debut and a lot of people were interested, and then a lot of people tuned out," said Norm Pattiz, chairman and chief executive officer of Westwood One Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pirate Radio, which swashbuckled onto the Southern California scene nearly two years ago amid much hoopla, high expectations and a $54-million price tag, sinks today. KQLZ-FM(100.3) was scheduled to switch formats at 6 this morning. The reason for the change was attributed to steadily plunging ratings. "We had a great debut and a lot of people were interested, and then a lot of people tuned out," said Norm Pattiz, chairman and chief executive officer of Westwood One Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If he were sleepwalking, Mark Shipper could easily stumble into the Pacific Ocean. But at 1:07 in the morning, his fax machine is whirring and his apartment is as Manhattan as Fifth Avenue. The TV is tuned to a New York news channel. The wall clock is set three hours ahead--to Eastern Daylight Time. The fax is bringing in New York's top morning news stories. All the while, Shipper's specially modified telephone is playing a New York radio station over a speaker phone.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1989
I am horrified at the "Eco-Systems" art exhibition (" 'Eco-Systems' Exhibit Lets Life Imitate Art," by Zan Dubin, March 5). How dare Betty Klausner justify using live animals for art! In this day and age of growing concern and awareness of the plight of all animals include bees and guppies, to allow this to take place is inexcusable. SHELLEY BUTLER West Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Pirate Thrasher: Ted (The Thrasher) Prichard is leaving KLOS-FM to be the morning drive personality on KQLZ-FM Pirate Radio. He'll start the 6-10 a.m. shift on Wednesday. Scott Shannon, who was at KQLZ, has returned to New York and has become the morning man at WPLJ.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The competition for Los Angeles' morning radio audience could soon turn into an all-out war with the move here from New York of Scott Shannon, creator of the "Morning Zoo" concept of slap-happy hip talk on morning rock radio. He'll be taking over the morning show on KIQQ-FM. That will put him head to head in the mornings against KIIS-FM's long-time ratings champ Rick Dees and his close runner-up, KPWR-FM's Jay Thomas.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989 | DENNIS McDOUGAL
There's a war going on each morning for the hearts and minds and ears of Southern California radio listeners. The battle cries go something like this: "Wake me up, Ken and Bob Company, wake me up. . . ." "Rick Dees in the morning! Live all over Southern California!" "This is Jay Thomas, Power 106, at 6:55 in the morning. . . ." "Hello, this is Mark and Kim along the KOST. . . ." "Pirate Radio. Welcome to the jungle. . . ." Nine million listeners populate the Los Angeles radio market.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1989
I am horrified at the "Eco-Systems" art exhibition (" 'Eco-Systems' Exhibit Lets Life Imitate Art," by Zan Dubin, March 5). How dare Betty Klausner justify using live animals for art! In this day and age of growing concern and awareness of the plight of all animals include bees and guppies, to allow this to take place is inexcusable. SHELLEY BUTLER West Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2006 | From a Times staff writer
Two DJs, two newsmen and a network executive have been selected as the 2006 inductees into the National Radio Hall of Fame. Those selected in balloting conducted by the Museum of Broadcast Communications in Chicago were CBS journalist Christopher Glenn; another CBS newsman, the late Douglas Edwards; New York DJ Scott Shannon; another disc jockey from the Big Apple, the late William B. Williams; and ABC Radio President John Hare. The induction ceremony will take place Nov.
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