Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScott Simon
IN THE NEWS

Scott Simon

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
July 29, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Scott Simon, a radio host for NPR's “Weekend Edition,” gave his mother, Patricia Simon Newman Gilband, a very public farewell. For the last few days, Simon, who has more than a million followers on Twitter, has been tweeting odes and observations from his mother's bedside in an intensive-care unit in a Chicago hospital, where she was dying. “It is a remarkable and moving moment,” fellow NPR host Peter Sagal of “Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me!” tweeted Saturday. “Pay attention.” On Monday at 7:17 p.m., Simon tweeted twice:  "The heavens over Chicago have opened and Patricia Lyons Simon Newman has stepped onstage.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Had someone asked me before a performance of Pergolesi's "Stabat Mater" at the Hollywood Bowl on Thursday night what I thought about Scott Simon's live tweeting his mother's death, I would have answered that I am not among the multitude of moved twitterati. I interpreted an NPR newscaster's employment of sympathy as a form of emotional self-aggrandizement, a warm bath of pathos. You could, however, level the same complaints against Pergolesi. He sugarcoated as sorrowful a text as you'll find in the liturgy.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | Robert Koehler, Free-lance writer Robert Koehler is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Usually, Scott Simon, as co-host (with Jackie Nespral) of NBC's recently launched weekend editions of "The Today Show," is the one asking the questions. When the tables are turned, and he is the interviewee, Simon wastes no time noting that "The Today Show" is hardly his first foray into television. He has hosted numerous public television specials (including his Emmy-winning "The Paterson Project"), as well as guest-hosted for Charlie Rose on "Nightwatch."
NEWS
August 3, 2013
By Kari Howard The other day I started reading Nick Hornby's “High Fidelity” for about the millionth time. And I realized: This is my favorite book. (I'd do a list of my top 5 books, but that would be too “High Fidelity.”) Yes, the riffs on pop music are brilliant. Witness this bit, which opens the movie version - miraculously, almost as good as the book, perhaps because of John Cusack, the thinking women's sex symbol (No. 2 or possibly 3 on my list, not that I'm necessarily a thinking woman)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scott Simon, the witty Peabody Award-winning host of National Public Radio's "Weekend Edition," is anchoring NPR's coverage of the Democratic convention in Los Angeles this week. That might be enough to fill a plate for most people, but not for Simon, who also has just published "Home and Away: Memoir of a Fan." The busy schedule of activities is not surprising for Simon, whose lengthy resume includes enough high points to satisfy the wildest dreams of journalistic success.
NEWS
November 15, 1992
I think Scott Simon (TV Times, Oct. 25) is the perfect person for the weekend "Today" (NBC) show. He's easy to listen to and he reminds me of a young Charles Kuralt. He informs the viewer with a well-told story without the hype. Martin Ostrye, Arcadia
OPINION
August 4, 1991
This is in response to allegations that the Bush Administration would hold back loan guarantees to Israel to help cover part of the enormous cost of resettling thousands of immigrants unless Israel halts settlements in Judea, Samaria and Gaza. Frankly, I'm disgusted at this sort of political blackmail! The two issues are in no way related. First, Israel has no policy of directing immigrants to the territories. Second, the loan guarantees are strictly an issue of humanitarian assistance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1999
Re "NFL Move Apparently Dooms L.A. as Site for New Fcouldn't be happier that the deal to bring an NFL expansion team to Los Angeles is on the rocks. If the league and owners don't want to enter the nation's second largest media market without substantial public subsidies, let them go to Houston. Los Angeles doesn't need a pro football team to provide an identity, much less to promote a sense of community. Now the challenge for the city and the state is to reestablish Memorial Coliseum as a premier sports stadium in a manner sympathetic to its architecture and history (that is, not surrounded by multilevel parking garages)
NATIONAL
July 29, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Days before his father is expected to spend the rest of his life in prison for kidnapping and sexually abusing three women, the son of Ariel Castro said his father belongs in prison. “I think it's the best possible sentence,” Anthony Castro said in an  interview broadcast on the “Today” show.  “I think if he really can't control his impulses and he really doesn't have any value for human life the way this case has shown, then behind bars is where he belongs for the rest of his life.” Last week, the elder Castro accepted a plea agreement that spared him the death penalty.
BOOKS
June 19, 2005 | Mark Rozzo
Pretty Birds Scott Simon Random House: 368 pp., $24.95 Back in the early 1990s, National Public Radio's Scott Simon covered the war in Sarajevo. In his first novel, "Pretty Birds," Simon offers up a grisly portrait of that sniper-infested city at the height of the longest siege in modern warfare.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Days before his father is expected to spend the rest of his life in prison for kidnapping and sexually abusing three women, the son of Ariel Castro said his father belongs in prison. “I think it's the best possible sentence,” Anthony Castro said in an  interview broadcast on the “Today” show.  “I think if he really can't control his impulses and he really doesn't have any value for human life the way this case has shown, then behind bars is where he belongs for the rest of his life.” Last week, the elder Castro accepted a plea agreement that spared him the death penalty.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Scott Simon, a radio host for NPR's “Weekend Edition,” gave his mother, Patricia Simon Newman Gilband, a very public farewell. For the last few days, Simon, who has more than a million followers on Twitter, has been tweeting odes and observations from his mother's bedside in an intensive-care unit in a Chicago hospital, where she was dying. “It is a remarkable and moving moment,” fellow NPR host Peter Sagal of “Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me!” tweeted Saturday. “Pay attention.” On Monday at 7:17 p.m., Simon tweeted twice:  "The heavens over Chicago have opened and Patricia Lyons Simon Newman has stepped onstage.
NEWS
March 10, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
Some of the best-known journalists at NPR have released what they call an open letter "to listeners and supporters" that calls remarks made by a former NPR fundraising executive "offensive" and says they have done "real damage" to the public broadcaster. On-air personalities such as Robert Siegel, Scott Simon, Renee Montagne Cokie Roberts and Nina Totenberg, signed the letter, which comes a day after NPR's president and CEO, Vivian Schiller, resigned in the wake of the controversy that erupted after NPR executive Ron Schiller was caught on video by conservative activists denigrating the "tea party" movement.
NEWS
November 13, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Not every trip can be a great travel bargain. High-end destination hotels and tours offer something far from the well-touristed path, whether it's visiting an obscure Arctic outpost or sleeping in a re-imagined palace. Are trips like this expensive? Absolutely. Can the average traveler afford to go? Maybe. Plenty of people save up for a once-in-a-lifetime travel experience, even during recessionary times. Why? Likely because travel sates a basic curiosity that fuels the urge to explore other cultures and other lands.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Lucky Ones One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America Mae Ngai Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 288 pp., $26. American history is a far bumpier ride than it used to be in the good old days. Mae Ngai is far more interested in the complications of history than the myths. The pathway to the American Dream was not linear, she writes, a neat journey from exclusion to inclusion. Hard work and perseverance were not all it took, much as we might like to believe it. And immigrants did not always pull each other up onto the golden mountain.
BOOKS
December 25, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Kevin Thomas is a film critic for The Times.
IN his later years, Robert M.W. Vogel -- longtime director of international production and publicity for MGM, co-founder of the motion picture academy's foreign-language Oscar category and stalwart of that academy branch until his death in 1996 -- dreamed of gathering all the survivors of the studio's golden era to collaborate on a book that would show the world that Louis B. Mayer, the studio's legendary head, was not the monster depicted in Bosley Crowther's "Hollywood Rajah."
NEWS
August 3, 2013
By Kari Howard The other day I started reading Nick Hornby's “High Fidelity” for about the millionth time. And I realized: This is my favorite book. (I'd do a list of my top 5 books, but that would be too “High Fidelity.”) Yes, the riffs on pop music are brilliant. Witness this bit, which opens the movie version - miraculously, almost as good as the book, perhaps because of John Cusack, the thinking women's sex symbol (No. 2 or possibly 3 on my list, not that I'm necessarily a thinking woman)
NEWS
November 13, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Not every trip can be a great travel bargain. High-end destination hotels and tours offer something far from the well-touristed path, whether it's visiting an obscure Arctic outpost or sleeping in a re-imagined palace. Are trips like this expensive? Absolutely. Can the average traveler afford to go? Maybe. Plenty of people save up for a once-in-a-lifetime travel experience, even during recessionary times. Why? Likely because travel sates a basic curiosity that fuels the urge to explore other cultures and other lands.
BOOKS
June 19, 2005 | Mark Rozzo
Pretty Birds Scott Simon Random House: 368 pp., $24.95 Back in the early 1990s, National Public Radio's Scott Simon covered the war in Sarajevo. In his first novel, "Pretty Birds," Simon offers up a grisly portrait of that sniper-infested city at the height of the longest siege in modern warfare.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2005 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
When Scott Simon arrived in Sarajevo in the summer of 1993, the city wasn't looking its best. Glass had pulsed from windows to the streets, once solid buildings bore gaping wounds, those who could had fled the snipers and artillery shells while survivors roamed a seemingly post-apocalyptic world of the undead.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|