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Scott Spiezio

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SPORTS
August 21, 2009 | Ben Bolch
Why should anyone believe him now? Scott Spiezio has said all the right things before, appeared more than contrite, and that didn't turn out so great. The former Angels hero was released by two major league teams in a whirlwind 44 days last year, the price of ugly public incidents. He had wrecked his car in Newport Beach after a drinking binge and later punched a friend who tried to help him. Now the 11-year major league veteran is with the Orange County Flyers of the Golden Baseball League, a baseball netherworld rife with "Thirsty Thursday" promotions and overzealous stadium announcers.
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SPORTS
May 23, 2011 | T.J. Simers
I wasn't rooting for the end of the world over the weekend, though there was some disappointment knowing I had no choice now but to join the Angels. You know — the ones down here who struggle so to be halfway decent Angels. The thing is, there is just nothing going on in Los Angeles, so there's nothing else to write about. I checked the Internet all the way up to game time, a little disappointed Kareem hadn't taken a sledgehammer to Magic or Jerry West's likenesses. It's so bad right now, I found myself looking for some golf tournament or horse race to write about instead of a baseball team that can't score.
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SPORTS
January 17, 2003 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
The lights dimmed, the anticipation rose, and the World Series heroes pranced onto the stage. The first baseman plays in a band, and the crowd erupted as the second baseman introduced the musicians. "I know you guys have been waiting for this for three years," Adam Kennedy hollered. Haven't we all? Scott Spiezio joined the Angels three years ago, an infielder in summer and a musician in winter. He sang lead vocals in a band called Sandfrog, he said, with buddies from back home in Illinois.
SPORTS
August 21, 2009 | Ben Bolch
Why should anyone believe him now? Scott Spiezio has said all the right things before, appeared more than contrite, and that didn't turn out so great. The former Angels hero was released by two major league teams in a whirlwind 44 days last year, the price of ugly public incidents. He had wrecked his car in Newport Beach after a drinking binge and later punched a friend who tried to help him. Now the 11-year major league veteran is with the Orange County Flyers of the Golden Baseball League, a baseball netherworld rife with "Thirsty Thursday" promotions and overzealous stadium announcers.
SPORTS
February 28, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Utility player Scott Spiezio, a key member of the 2002 World Series champion Angels, was cut by the St. Louis Cardinals on Wednesday, released after being charged in a six-count complaint involving drunk driving and assault in a December car crash. "We had heard some things about this," General Manager John Mozeliak said. "Ultimately, nothing was ever confirmed to the level it was today. To have this warrant put out there, it completely changes the landscape of what we're dealing with."
SPORTS
October 12, 2002 | BOB CUOMO
Troy Glaus continued to give us his best Mike Schmidt impersonation, hitting the game-winning homer off J.C. Romero in the bottom of the eighth inning. It was his fourth solo homer of the postseason. It also was the first run given up by the Twin bullpen in 5 2/3 innings in the series. * The Angels had a chance to break the game open in the second inning after Garret Anderson led off with a homer. With one out, Scott Spiezio walked and Shawn Wooten singled, sending Spiezio to third.
SPORTS
October 17, 2002 | Bill Shaikin
Scott Spiezio keeps five gloves in his locker--one each for first base, second base, third base and the outfield, plus a backup for first base. He could need more than one glove in the World Series, particularly with National League rules in force during the three games in San Francisco. Spiezio starts at first base, but Shawn Wooten, Benji Gil and Brad Fullmer all can play there.
SPORTS
October 7, 2005 | Bill Plaschke
From an apartment above a gym in a small town south of Chicago, he watches. When the Angels fall behind, he fidgets. When the Angels need a big hit, he's ready. He has lost his team, lost his cheering section, lost the celebrated persona that once helped him swagger from Letterman to Leno. But he still has his memories. He lets them dangle in front of his mind like one of those trademark locks of hair, and when the Angels are in a jam, he reaches for them.
SPORTS
February 26, 2002 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If he would not go home encouraged, at least he would not go home discouraged. In the final days of a frustrating season, before he cleared out his locker for the winter, Scott Spiezio entered the manager's office, shut the door and sat down. Spiezio was convinced that no matter what he did, the Angels never would consider him an everyday player. He said it, Mike Scioscia read it, and the manager summoned Spiezio for a little chat. "He said he knows I could play every day," Spiezio said.
SPORTS
June 12, 2000 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
Scott Spiezio was on the field, glove on hand, poised to take over at third base in the second inning Sunday while Manager Mike Scioscia and trainers tended to the fallen Troy Glaus, who suffered an injury when he knocked knees with Arizona first baseman Greg Colbrunn. This was very bad for the Angels. Of all their regulars, Glaus may be the one the Angels can least afford to lose, because the drop-off to his replacement would be a fall of Grand Canyon-like proportions. Glaus is batting .
SPORTS
August 16, 2009 | Ben Bolch
Almost seven years after his three-run, seventh-inning homer altered the course of the 2002 World Series, former Angel Scott Spiezio still hears about his blast for the ages. "Everyone's got a story associated with it," said the utilityman, who is trying to revive his career with the Orange County Flyers of the independent Golden Baseball League. Spiezio heard from an angry San Francisco fan who blamed him for getting stuck with T-shirts and bumper stickers proclaiming the Giants world champions.
SPORTS
August 12, 2009 | Kevin Baxter
The Angels would rather pay reliever Justin Speier $6.5 million not to pitch for them the rest of this season and all of next, giving the veteran right-hander his unconditional release before Tuesday's game with the Tampa Bay Rays. "We felt it was appropriate, not only [for] the organization, but for the player, to make the move now as opposed to getting down the road in the season and making the move at some point later," General Manager Tony Reagins said. By releasing him unconditionally, the Angels essentially granted Speier free agency, allowing him to sign with any club that wants him. However the Angels are responsible for the money left on the four-year, $18-million contract Speier signed with them after the 2006 season.
SPORTS
February 28, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Utility player Scott Spiezio, a key member of the 2002 World Series champion Angels, was cut by the St. Louis Cardinals on Wednesday, released after being charged in a six-count complaint involving drunk driving and assault in a December car crash. "We had heard some things about this," General Manager John Mozeliak said. "Ultimately, nothing was ever confirmed to the level it was today. To have this warrant put out there, it completely changes the landscape of what we're dealing with."
SPORTS
February 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
ST. LOUIS -- Music has long been a part of Scott Spiezio's life. Now it's also part of his therapy. The St. Louis Cardinals' utility player missed more than a month last season while receiving treatment for substance abuse. He poured the emotions from that ordeal and his team's doomed follow-up to a World Series title into the latest CD for Sandfrog, the hard rock band he fronts in his spare time. The title, "Offseason," speaks to Spiezio's off-field issues, Josh Hancock's drunk-driving death and the team's myriad injuries.
SPORTS
October 7, 2005 | Bill Plaschke
From an apartment above a gym in a small town south of Chicago, he watches. When the Angels fall behind, he fidgets. When the Angels need a big hit, he's ready. He has lost his team, lost his cheering section, lost the celebrated persona that once helped him swagger from Letterman to Leno. But he still has his memories. He lets them dangle in front of his mind like one of those trademark locks of hair, and when the Angels are in a jam, he reaches for them.
SPORTS
September 25, 2003 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
The Angels have told the agent for infielder Scott Spiezio they would like to discuss a contract for next season, Spiezio said Wednesday. Spiezio, the starting first baseman this year and last, plans to file for free agency. He could face a pay cut from his $4.25-million salary, in Anaheim or elsewhere.
SPORTS
September 25, 2003 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
The Angels have told the agent for infielder Scott Spiezio they would like to discuss a contract for next season, Spiezio said Wednesday. Spiezio, the starting first baseman this year and last, plans to file for free agency. He could face a pay cut from his $4.25-million salary, in Anaheim or elsewhere.
SPORTS
October 2, 2001 | Bill Shaikin
Scott Spiezio signed with the Angels early last year because they offered him a chance to play every day at second base. Then they traded for Adam Kennedy in spring training and Spiezio did not get his chance to play every day until last July, at first base, and only after Wally Joyner retired and rookie Larry Barnes was hitting .100.
SPORTS
September 17, 2003 | Ben Bolch, Times Staff Writer
With the clock possibly ticking on his Angel career, Scott Spiezio expressed hope that his three-run walk-off home run Tuesday that propelled the Angels to a come-from-behind 6-5 victory over the Oakland Athletics did not represent his last memorable moment at Edison Field. Spiezio, who slammed the first pitch he saw in the ninth inning from Oakland reliever Jim Mecir into the seats in right-center field, will long be remembered for a far more significant homer in Angel history.
SPORTS
September 2, 2003 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
The Angel lineup is riddled with holes, so what's another? On Sunday, the final day teams could acquire players and include them on a potential playoff roster, the Angels considered trading infielder Scott Spiezio to the Florida Marlins. The day came and went without a trade, and Spiezio came with the Angels to Minnesota. They were more than happy to have him Monday, when he hit a grand slam in a 10-2 victory over the Minnesota Twins.
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