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Scott Spolin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1995
A federal magistrate judge on Tuesday ordered a Canyon Country man with a history of filing phony tax returns jailed pending trial Sept. 5 on similar charges. Aman Khan, 46, has pleaded not guilty to filing tax returns for two fictitious people, Stella Ramtoo and Anthony Fernandez. The airplane parts manufacturer already was on probation for a 1991 conviction in a similar tax scheme. And he is under investigation for selling used airplane parts as new, Assistant U.S. Atty. Mark Byrne said.
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MAGAZINE
February 24, 2002
I read with interest Benjamin Smith's story about Valery Itzkevitch's attempt to immigrate to the U.S. from his native Latvia ("Giving Up on America," Jan. 27). I was perplexed by the ambivalent nature of the article, which neither explored the depth of such failed attempts by would-be immigrants nor the options that could have allowed Itzkevitch to stay in Los Angeles. The article left me with the sense that Itzkevitch was more concerned with material comforts and career standing than with fleeing anti-Semitism and persecution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1996 | JOHN M. GONZALES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A federal judge Monday sentenced a Canyon Country man to 4 1/2 years in prison for tax fraud, shoddy aircraft repairs and endangering the lives of military and civilian fliers by selling bogus aircraft parts. Aman Khan, 46, also was banned from dealing in aircraft parts in the future, ordered to serve three years probation and pay $698,905 in fines to reimburse the government and civilian firms. U.S. District Court Judge David V.
MAGAZINE
January 27, 2002 | BENJAMIN SMITH, Benjamin Smith is a former Baltic correspondent for the Wall Street Journal Europe
Last year, Scott Spolin got the opportunity to repay an old debt. The chance came in the slim, 25-year-old form of Valery Itzkevitch, who walked into Spolin's law office one sunny afternoon. What Spolin saw in the young man from Eastern Europe was a chance to share his own family's immigrant success story. The two men sat together in Spolin's spare office--the guest neat and formal, with a black suit and elegant, creaky English; the host compact, casual and blunt.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | KAREN ROEBUCK, Times Staff Writer
When the Fletcher Oil and Refinery Co. in Carson discovered that $12,422 had been misappropriated, the company fired its controller, Curtis E. Schroeder, but did not press criminal charges. After all, more than $7,000 of the money had gone to USC, Schroeder's alma mater, and he agreed to pay it all back, a company attorney said. "At the time, it could be construed that he was just overzealous," Fletcher Vice President Michael Leavitt said.
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