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Scott Stantis

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OPINION
June 20, 2010
I write this week from the annual confab of political cartoonists in Portland, Ore., where the cocktail chatter (OK, we're more the beer type) is all about the difficulty of focusing on anything other than the monstrous BP calamity. But cartoonists never lose sight of the really important stuff: like war. Scott Stantis made somber note of a dubious Afghanistan military milestone. Matt Davies gazed into his McChrystal ball, but saw no peace, just chaotic conflict since time immemorial.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
October 3, 2010
So editorial cartooning is a solidly old-school medium. But in between penciling, inking and erasing, we blog, tweet, scan, clone and otherwise electronically alter. And we try to keep our characters up to date. Jeff Danziger's texting-while-strafing piece is a killer. Jim Morin is no hack, as his schoolboy e-warrior demonstrates. And Scott Stantis doesn't phone it in, calling out the Obama/Biden administration for its oh-so-Bush/Cheney tendencies. I guess cartoonists draw both Dubya and Obama with oversized ears for a reason.
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OPINION
November 1, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Lexington Herald-Leader. His cartoons also appear in USA Today.
Whether expressing ex parte advice, exposing excesses or just exorcising exasperation, who better for editorialists to exploit than ex-presidents? Rob Rogers' Dick Cheney exhaustively exercises external pressure. Scott Stantis exhumes an (expletive deleted) ex-prez to excoriate Barack Obama. And Tony Auth's art exhibits Lyndon Johnson in an exhortation to exercise extreme caution. -- Joel Pett Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Lexington Herald-Leader.
OPINION
June 27, 2010
If journalism is the first rough draft of history, then maybe editorial cartoons are the initial hysterical histrionic scrawls in the margins. Rex Babin looked back six decades and generated a great greatest-generation-general idea. Scott Stantis expressed his cha-grin, using 20-'70's hindsight to compare 39 and 44 (what, no cardigan?). And Stephanie McMillan's sustainability piece had teeth too. Though if she's right and history repeats itself, we could all be, well, history. Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky.
OPINION
June 27, 2010
If journalism is the first rough draft of history, then maybe editorial cartoons are the initial hysterical histrionic scrawls in the margins. Rex Babin looked back six decades and generated a great greatest-generation-general idea. Scott Stantis expressed his cha-grin, using 20-'70's hindsight to compare 39 and 44 (what, no cardigan?). And Stephanie McMillan's sustainability piece had teeth too. Though if she's right and history repeats itself, we could all be, well, history. Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky.
OPINION
October 3, 2010
So editorial cartooning is a solidly old-school medium. But in between penciling, inking and erasing, we blog, tweet, scan, clone and otherwise electronically alter. And we try to keep our characters up to date. Jeff Danziger's texting-while-strafing piece is a killer. Jim Morin is no hack, as his schoolboy e-warrior demonstrates. And Scott Stantis doesn't phone it in, calling out the Obama/Biden administration for its oh-so-Bush/Cheney tendencies. I guess cartoonists draw both Dubya and Obama with oversized ears for a reason.
OPINION
March 7, 2010
Familiarity breeds contempt, so cartoonists have a home-field advantage when we home in on subjects close to home. You can wager your credit-default swaps that nobody has Mitt Romney nailed like Boston's Dan Wasserman. The Chicago gun-rights statute made an easy target for the Tribune's Scott Stantis. And only a California cartoonist like Sacramento's Rex Babin could draw on the widespread animosity about Anthem Blue Cross. Now if you'll excuse me, I've got to pay homage to a hometown hero.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2004
A new comic strip, "Prickly City," debuts this week. The comic, by conservative editorial cartoonist Scott Stantis, follows the tale of Winslow, a coyote cub, and a little girl named Carmen, who live in Prickly City. "Prickly City" will appear on this page. "Get Fuzzy" moves to the next page, replacing "Grand Avenue."
OPINION
November 30, 2008 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
How to measure cartoonists' confidence? Here's a clue: Forget red -- the more black ink spilled, the bleaker the outlook. Scott Stantis used a barrelful while resurrecting a classic disaster metaphor. Steve Kelley opted for a lighter but still dark touch, co-opting another comic classic. But Signe Wilkinson hungered for something that captured the holiday spirit, and she delivered. So relax. The "fun"-damentals of satire are sound. -- Joel Pett
OPINION
April 19, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
We cartoonists picked up our pens and filed cartoons putting down taxes. Scott Stantis' screeches hit the high seas, his plank-walking filers having filled in the (blankety-blank) blanks. Jeff Parker dogged the Obama administration, implying the White House-trained pooch wasn't properly vetted. (Fill out form K-9 in triplicate!) Finally, my agent told the tea-partying crowd exactly where to go, though some may call mine a failed statement. -- Joel Pett
OPINION
June 20, 2010
I write this week from the annual confab of political cartoonists in Portland, Ore., where the cocktail chatter (OK, we're more the beer type) is all about the difficulty of focusing on anything other than the monstrous BP calamity. But cartoonists never lose sight of the really important stuff: like war. Scott Stantis made somber note of a dubious Afghanistan military milestone. Matt Davies gazed into his McChrystal ball, but saw no peace, just chaotic conflict since time immemorial.
OPINION
March 7, 2010
Familiarity breeds contempt, so cartoonists have a home-field advantage when we home in on subjects close to home. You can wager your credit-default swaps that nobody has Mitt Romney nailed like Boston's Dan Wasserman. The Chicago gun-rights statute made an easy target for the Tribune's Scott Stantis. And only a California cartoonist like Sacramento's Rex Babin could draw on the widespread animosity about Anthem Blue Cross. Now if you'll excuse me, I've got to pay homage to a hometown hero.
OPINION
November 1, 2009 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Lexington Herald-Leader. His cartoons also appear in USA Today.
Whether expressing ex parte advice, exposing excesses or just exorcising exasperation, who better for editorialists to exploit than ex-presidents? Rob Rogers' Dick Cheney exhaustively exercises external pressure. Scott Stantis exhumes an (expletive deleted) ex-prez to excoriate Barack Obama. And Tony Auth's art exhibits Lyndon Johnson in an exhortation to exercise extreme caution. -- Joel Pett Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist for the Lexington Herald-Leader.
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