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Scott Tinley

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SPORTS
June 20, 1988 | JEFFREY PARENTI
Scott Tinley pulled away from his competitors in the final transition of the San Diego International Triathlon on Sunday and won the $2,500 first-place prize. In the women's race, Paula Newby-Fraser, who had raced in Atlanta only Saturday, completed the swim portion first, gained nearly a two-minute lead on the bike, and cruised in to win in 1 hour 37 minutes 15 seconds. Newby-Fraser, 26, who resides in Encinitas, earned $1,500.
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SPORTS
September 13, 1992 | JOHN GEIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As triathlon's Big Four push toward 40 and ease into retirement, the sport's sponsors are searching for new life. They might want to scout a few out-of-the-way cemeteries. That's where the new breed of triathlete sleeps. Unless Jim Morrison is buried there, cemeteries are always quiet and, best of all, they're dirt cheap. Chuck Veylupek was the first to discover the restful quality of graveyards and live to tell about it.
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SPORTS
June 1, 1986 | LAURIE THOMPSON
World-class triathlete Scott Tinley knows that the business world isn't all fun and games. So Tinley, who has tried to balance business with sports through eight jobs in the past seven years, has struck a career compromise. At 27, he has found a profession where he can make his sport a business: Tinley has become a full-time triathlete. The formula seemed to work last year when Tinley won 12 major triathlons, including Hawaii's Ironman, and was named Triathlon magazine's Triathlete of the year.
SPORTS
June 19, 1989 | KIM Q. BERKSHIRE
This time, Brad Kearns of Malibu avoided all pitfalls en route to winning the San Diego International Triathlon Sunday. After finishing the one-kilometer swim at Spanish Landing in fifth place, Kearns took the lead a little more than halfway though the 30-kilometer bike segment on Cabrillo Memorial Drive. He never trailed thereafter and won the professional men's division in an unofficial 1 hour 31 minutes 8 seconds, well off Scott Tinley's record of 1:24:42. Tinley of Del Mar did not enter the race because he was competing in Japan.
SPORTS
June 4, 1989 | ROBYN NORWOOD, Times Staff Writer
Scott Tinley started competing in triathlons in 1976, in the days when the sport was most often known as a grueling, masochistic endeavor, if it was known at all. Since then, triathlons have proliferated in a variety of distances, including mini-triathlons for weekend athletes and, of course, the famed Ironman at Kona, Hawaii--a 3.8-kilometer swim (2.4 miles) and 180-kilometer bike race (111.6 miles) topped off with a marathon. Other triathletes have won more often and won more money than Tinley, who grew up in La Mirada and went to Fullerton College before graduating from San Diego State, although he does have three of the five fastest times at Ironman distances.
SPORTS
February 12, 1986
Joanne Ernst, 26, of Palo Alto, and Scott Tinley, 29, of Encinitas have been selected 1985 triathletes of the year by Triathlon magazine.
SPORTS
August 4, 1985 | STEVE LOWERY
Funny how things worked out for Julie Moss. In February of 1982, when she was less than 15 feet away from winning the Super Bowl of triathlons, the Ironman in Hawaii, she lay flat on the pavement. Fifteen feet. Five giant steps and the world of triathlon, and all the sponsorships she could handle, would be hers. She had passed six women in the 26.2-mile run, the event's final leg, and now, flat on her back, she thought about the proper way to win the Ironman.
SPORTS
June 14, 1986
Scott Molina, four-time defending men's champion, heads a field of more than 1,000 entered in today's fifth Los Angeles regional event of the U.S. Triathlon Series at Doheny State Beach in Dana Point. The race, part of a 13-event tour, will start at 7 a.m. with a 1.5-kilometer swim, followed by a 40-kilometer bike ride and a 10-kilometer run. Molina, who has won 22 of 29 series starts, finished 21 seconds ahead of Scott Tinley here last year.
SPORTS
June 4, 1989 | ROBYN NORWOOD
Scott Tinley is one of the leading competitors in today's Orange County Performing Arts Center Triathlon, which he has won twice in three years. Today's triathlon begins at 7 a.m. with a 1.5-kilometer swim (nine-tenths of a mile) in Lake Mission Viejo starting from North Beach, followed by a 40-kilometer bike race (24.8 miles) and 10-kilometer run (6.2 miles) over the hills surrounding the lake. Among the other men expected to compete are Danny Banks of Pasadena; Rubin Chapins, a former UCLA student who at 38 is one of Hawaii's best triathletes, and Tom Gallager of Los Angeles, who finished the 1987 Ironman despite having to carry his wrecked bicycle to the start of the running race after he was hit by a taxi.
SPORTS
June 5, 1989 | ROBYN NORWOOD, Times Staff Writer
One way to win a race is to make sure the only race is behind you, which is what Scott Tinley did Sunday in the Orange County Performing Arts Center Triathlon. "My whole tactic," Tinley said, "was out of sight, out of mind." Tinley came out of the water of Lake Mission Viejo in third place after the 1,500-meter swim, bolted to the lead in a pack of three in the first mile of the 40-kilometer bike ride and pulled away by the midway point. He was soon out of sight and on the way to victory in 1 hour 54 minutes 14 seconds, finishing more than three minutes ahead of Emilio DeSoto for his third victory in this triathlon's four-year history.
SPORTS
June 5, 1989 | ROBYN NORWOOD, Times Staff Writer
One way to win a race is to make sure the only race is behind you, which is what Scott Tinley did Sunday in the Orange County Performing Arts Center Triathlon. "My whole tactic was out of sight, out of mind," Tinley said. Tinley of Encinitas came out of the water of Lake Mission Viejo in third place after the 1,500-meter swim, bolted to the lead in a pack of three in the first mile of the 40-kilometer bike ride and pulled away by the midway point. He was soon out of sight, and on the way to victory in 1 hour 54 minutes 14 seconds, finishing more than three minutes ahead of Emilio DeSoto of San Diego for his third victory in the triathlon's four-year history.
SPORTS
June 4, 1989 | ROBYN NORWOOD, Times Staff Writer
Scott Tinley started competing in triathlons in 1976, in the days when the sport was most often known as a grueling, masochistic endeavor, if it was known at all. Since then, triathlons have proliferated in a variety of distances, including mini-triathlons for weekend athletes and, of course, the famed Ironman at Kona, Hawaii--a 3.8-kilometer swim (2.4 miles) and 180-kilometer bike race (111.6 miles) topped off with a marathon. Other triathletes have won more often and won more money than Tinley, who grew up in La Mirada and went to Fullerton College before graduating from San Diego State, although he does have three of the five fastest times at Ironman distances.
SPORTS
June 4, 1989 | ROBYN NORWOOD
Scott Tinley is one of the leading competitors in today's Orange County Performing Arts Center Triathlon, which he has won twice in three years. Today's triathlon begins at 7 a.m. with a 1.5-kilometer swim (nine-tenths of a mile) in Lake Mission Viejo starting from North Beach, followed by a 40-kilometer bike race (24.8 miles) and 10-kilometer run (6.2 miles) over the hills surrounding the lake. Among the other men expected to compete are Danny Banks of Pasadena; Rubin Chapins, a former UCLA student who at 38 is one of Hawaii's best triathletes, and Tom Gallager of Los Angeles, who finished the 1987 Ironman despite having to carry his wrecked bicycle to the start of the running race after he was hit by a taxi.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1989 | JEFFREY BEAN, Times Staff Writer
Jim Riley gave up his crisply starched white-collar shirts and his gray suits in 1982, leaving his position as branch manager for Xerox in Los Angeles with plans of starting up a fitness-clothing company in his native New Zealand. However, after learning of his country's tight restrictions on importing preconstructed clothing, Riley turned his sights south to San Diego, where he could work part time, learn the rag trade and continue one of his favorite activities: training for triathlons.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1989 | JEFFREY BEAN, Times Staff Writer
Jim Riley gave up his crisply starched white-collar shirts and his gray suits in 1982, leaving his position as branch manager for Xerox in Los Angeles with plans of starting up a fitness clothing company in his native New Zealand. However, after learning of his country's tight restrictions on importing preconstructed clothing, Riley turned his sights south to San Diego, where he could work part time, learn the rag trade and continue one of his favorite activities: training for triathlons.
SPORTS
June 5, 1989 | ROBYN NORWOOD, Times Staff Writer
One way to win a race is to make sure the only race is behind you, which is what Scott Tinley did Sunday in the Orange County Performing Arts Center Triathlon. "My whole tactic was out of sight, out of mind," Tinley said. Tinley of Encinitas came out of the water of Lake Mission Viejo in third place after the 1,500-meter swim, bolted to the lead in a pack of three in the first mile of the 40-kilometer bike ride and pulled away by the midway point. He was soon out of sight, and on the way to victory in 1 hour 54 minutes 14 seconds, finishing more than three minutes ahead of Emilio DeSoto of San Diego for his third victory in the triathlon's four-year history.
SPORTS
September 12, 1987
About 2,100 triathletes will compete in the San Diego Bud Light triathlon at 7 a.m. Sunday, starting and finishing at Solana Beach. The race--a 1.5-kilometer swim, a 40-kilometer bike ride and a 10-kilometer run--is the second largest race, after Chicago's, in the 12-event U.S. Triathlon series. Sunday's race is the last chance for competitors to qualify for the national championships, which will be held Sept. 27 at Hilton Head Island, S.C.
SPORTS
June 20, 1988 | JEFFREY PARENTI
Scott Tinley pulled away from his competitors in the final transition of the San Diego International Triathlon on Sunday and won the $2,500 first-place prize. In the women's race, Paula Newby-Fraser, who had raced in Atlanta only Saturday, completed the swim portion first, gained nearly a two-minute lead on the bike, and cruised in to win in 1 hour 37 minutes 15 seconds. Newby-Fraser, 26, who resides in Encinitas, earned $1,500.
SPORTS
September 12, 1987
About 2,100 triathletes will compete in the San Diego Bud Light triathlon at 7 a.m. Sunday, starting and finishing at Solana Beach. The race--a 1.5-kilometer swim, a 40-kilometer bike ride and a 10-kilometer run--is the second largest race, after Chicago's, in the 12-event U.S. Triathlon series. Sunday's race is the last chance for competitors to qualify for the national championships, which will be held Sept. 27 at Hilton Head Island, S.C.
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