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Scott Turow

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Bestselling author Scott Turow is back with a new legal thriller, "Identical" -- look for our review in the Sunday Los Angeles Times -- and making the talk show rounds. On "CBS This Morning," he talked about the book and its origins, then turned to Amazon.com, explaining what things about the online retailer he finds "evil. " "To me, it looks like Amazon is trying to monopolize the e-book market," said Turow, a practicing attorney, choosing his words carefully. "They used what I thought of as unfair tactics.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Paula Woods
Over the course of nine novels, Scott Turow's Kindle County has become one the best-known settings in American literature. While fictional locations are not uncommon in the crime genre - the city of Santa Teresa in Ross Macdonald's and, later, Sue Grafton's mysteries comes most readily to mind - Turow's character-driven legal thrillers are more aligned with the artistic vision of William Faulkner, whose novels and short stories are set in Yoknapatawpha County,...
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2010 | By Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Literary empires have to start somewhere, and Scott Turow's began 23 years ago with the creation of an unusually trusting prosecutor named Rusty Sabich, whose affair with a somewhat pathological colleague made him the prime suspect after she was found bound, naked and dead. Sabich, of course, was innocent — not much of a murder-mystery if the protagonist is guilty. But the twisting plot Turow hatched for that debut novel, "Presumed Innocent," kept readers thinking and dissecting long after they finished the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Bestselling author Scott Turow is back with a new legal thriller, "Identical" -- look for our review in the Sunday Los Angeles Times -- and making the talk show rounds. On "CBS This Morning," he talked about the book and its origins, then turned to Amazon.com, explaining what things about the online retailer he finds "evil. " "To me, it looks like Amazon is trying to monopolize the e-book market," said Turow, a practicing attorney, choosing his words carefully. "They used what I thought of as unfair tactics.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | SUSAN KING
Hollywood went on a feeding frenzy to obtain the movie rights to Chicago lawyer Scott Turow's phenomenal first novel "Presumed Innocent." "It began a sort of Hollywood mania," Turow recalled. "It was one weekend's madness." And the big-budget film version, which starred Harrison Ford, Raul Julia and Brian Dennehy, subsequently became one of the critical and commercial hits of 1990.
BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | EDNA BUCHANAN
The tension and violence on America's big-city streets erupts in semiautomatic weapon fire to launch "The Laws of Our Fathers," Scott Turow's gripping new novel. A white senator's ex-wife and a black teenage street whore are left sprawled like the detritus of the night on bloodied pavement at dawn. The two have nothing, and everything, in common.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2006 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
IT'S easy to take Scott Turow for granted. It seems as if a new generation of crime writers -- Dennis Lehane, George Pelecanos, Michael Connelly -- has emerged since Turow's explosive debut novel "Presumed Innocent" was published in 1987. He's just gone about writing his bestsellers without much fuss. Critics don't pay much attention to the old hands when new blood makes for sexier copy. But Turow remains a master of the legal procedural.
BOOKS
June 3, 1990 | Bill Blum, Blum is a public-interest attorney and writer living in Los Angeles. and
No one on the contemporary scene writes better mystery-suspense novels than Chicago attorney Scott Turow. In a genre overcrowded with transparent plots and one-dimensional supersleuths, Turow's first novel, "Presumed Innocent," was a work of serious fiction as well as a gripping tale of murder and courtroom drama.
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a party celebrating the publication of his new novel, "The Burden of Proof," in New York City late last week, best-selling author Scott Turow said it best when he told his publisher: "Leaving aside the birth of my children, this has probably been the best week of my life." Today, the Chicago attorney-novelist, whose 1987 first novel, "Presumed Innocent," was a publishing phenomenon, joined the ranks of Ernest Hemingway, J.D.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | Jerry Hicks and Dan Crump
LAW BOOKS: Whom do lawyers want to listen to when they've had enough of ponderous legal seminars? A best-selling author. . . . Scott Turow, whose "Presumed Innocent" and "The Burden of Proof" were runaway courtroom hits, is the State Bar convention's scheduled speaker Saturday. At $28 per lunch, it's been sold out for weeks. It seems most local lawyers have read the Chicago attorney's two novels. The consensus: Loved them both, but the first one was better.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2011
'Scott Turow's Innocent' Where: TNT When: 9 p.m. Tuesday Rating: TV-14-LS (may be unsuitable for children under the age of 14 with advisories for coarse language and sex)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2010
Compiled by Grace Krilanovich. SUNDAY John Baldessari : LACMA presents the artist and curator Leslie Jones in a conversation held in conjunction with the opening of the retrospective exhibition, "John Baldessari: Pure Beauty." Broad Contemporary Art Museum at LACMA, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. 2 p.m. Free. (323) 857-6512. Francesca Lia Block : The author will present and sign her new children's picture book, "House of Dolls." Diesel Bookstore, 225 26th St., L.A. 3 p.m. Free.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2010 | By Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Literary empires have to start somewhere, and Scott Turow's began 23 years ago with the creation of an unusually trusting prosecutor named Rusty Sabich, whose affair with a somewhat pathological colleague made him the prime suspect after she was found bound, naked and dead. Sabich, of course, was innocent — not much of a murder-mystery if the protagonist is guilty. But the twisting plot Turow hatched for that debut novel, "Presumed Innocent," kept readers thinking and dissecting long after they finished the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2006 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
IT'S easy to take Scott Turow for granted. It seems as if a new generation of crime writers -- Dennis Lehane, George Pelecanos, Michael Connelly -- has emerged since Turow's explosive debut novel "Presumed Innocent" was published in 1987. He's just gone about writing his bestsellers without much fuss. Critics don't pay much attention to the old hands when new blood makes for sexier copy. But Turow remains a master of the legal procedural.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2005 | John Sacret Young, Special to The Times
ALMOST 20 years ago a first novel appeared that was prefaced by these words: "This is how I always start: 'I am the prosecutor. I represent the state. I am here to present to you the evidence of a crime. Together you will weigh this evidence. You will deliberate upon it. You will decide if it proves the defendant's guilt.... [Y]ou must try to determine what actually occurred and ... if we cannot find the truth, what is our hope of justice?'
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
Attorney-novelist Scott Turow's poky legal potboiler "Reversible Errors" has become "Scott Turow's Reversible Errors" (CBS, Sunday and Tuesday at 9 p.m.), a workmanlike two-part TV movie as easy to watch as it is to forget.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
Attorney-novelist Scott Turow's poky legal potboiler "Reversible Errors" has become "Scott Turow's Reversible Errors" (CBS, Sunday and Tuesday at 9 p.m.), a workmanlike two-part TV movie as easy to watch as it is to forget.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2003 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
Capital punishment has long been a litmus test in this culture, a standard by which politicians define their commitment to law and order even as death penalty opponents frame the matter in terms of moral absolutes. On the one hand, murder is a crime so extreme that it requires the most extreme retribution. On the other, state-sanctioned killing reduces our society to its lowest common denominator, making all of us complicit in the taking of a life.
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