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Scott Tyler

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NEWS
March 26, 1989
An art teacher got revenge of sorts on the artist whose Chicago exhibit invited visitors to walk on the American flag. The teacher created an exhibit of his own, offering observers a chance to walk on a caricature of the offending flag display's creator. It features a life-size sketch of artist "Dread" Scott Tyler, drawn on cloth in the manner of a police outline of a homicide victim. The cloth is on the floor, and a U.S. flag hangs above it on a museum wall.
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NEWS
March 26, 1989
An art teacher got revenge of sorts on the artist whose Chicago exhibit invited visitors to walk on the American flag. The teacher created an exhibit of his own, offering observers a chance to walk on a caricature of the offending flag display's creator. It features a life-size sketch of artist "Dread" Scott Tyler, drawn on cloth in the manner of a police outline of a homicide victim. The cloth is on the floor, and a U.S. flag hangs above it on a museum wall.
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NEWS
February 28, 1989 | TRACY SHRYER, Times Staff Writer
For the second time in a year, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago bowed to an organized protest over a provocative piece of art, closing a gallery Monday "until the school can resolve security and safety needs." The controversial work includes an American Flag on the floor of the gallery where creations by minority students at the school went on display last week. Veterans' groups charged it was a desecration of the flag.
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | TRACY SHRYER, Times Staff Writer
Call it performance art, Chicago-style. About 3,000 protesters, many of them veterans, flocked to the steps of the Art Institute of Chicago on Sunday to protest an exhibit that, they charge, desecrates the American flag. Some did it by desecrating the Soviet flag. Others carried patriotic signs and flags as they sang and chanted. Some railed against the "satanic communists" they held responsible for the "travesty" inside.
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | TRACY SHRYER, Times Staff Writer
Call it performance art, Chicago-style. About 3,000 protesters, many of them veterans, flocked to the steps of the Art Institute of Chicago on Sunday to protest an exhibit that, they charge, desecrates the American flag. Some did it by desecrating the Soviet flag. Others carried patriotic signs and flags as they sang and chanted. Some railed against the "satanic communists" they held responsible for the "travesty" inside.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2008 | Matea Gold
HBO has picked up a television series based on Alexander McCall Smith's book "The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency" and its popular sequels, which relate the adventures of Precious Ramotswe, a no-nonsense investigator who runs a detective agency in Botswana. A two-hour pilot, starring Jill Scott ("Tyler Perry's Why Did I Get Married?"), was recently filmed on location in Botswana, directed by Anthony Minghella, who co-wrote the script with Richard Curtis. HBO, in partnership with the Weinstein Co. and the BBC, ordered 13 additional one-hour episodes of the series, which will begin filming this summer.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The first court test of the nation's new flag desecration law began with charges filed against three demonstrators arrested in a flag-burning protest on the steps of the U.S. Capitol. No charges were brought against a fourth demonstrator, Gregory (Joey) Johnson. It was a case involving Johnson, who burned a flag at the 1984 Republican National Convention, that led to a Supreme Court ruling in June that such activity is protected under the First Amendment.
NEWS
March 2, 1987
Randolph Scott, the tall handsome cowboy in countless Hollywood Westerns, whose square-jawed countenance and poker-faced stare became the prototype for a generation of more modern Western heroes, died today at his Bel-Air home. He was 89. The actor's son-in-law, Sam Tyler, said Scott died at 6 a.m. in his sleep. He had been in ill health in recent years, suffering from a weak heart, and had several bouts with pneumonia.
NEWS
April 30, 1989
Your article, "Shadows on a Legend" (by Garry Abrams, March 24), gives undeserved publicity and recognition to two authors whose journalistic credibility has been questioned on several previous occasions. Their book is composed of false allegations, rumors and contorted interviews. Simple facts such as how my grandfather died are incorrect as are the insulting charges about my father, Randolph Scott. At least twice, the authors used anonymous sources casting doubt over the specific allegations as well as the integrity of the total book.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1996 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Exhibition Sparks Protest: An angry crowd of 300 protesters, most of them affiliated with the Arizona Department of the American Legion, converged on the Phoenix Museum of Art Sunday to decry the exhibition "Old Glory: The American Flag in Contemporary Art." Legionnaires had demanded the removal of several pieces, including Scott Tyler's "What Is the Proper Way to Display a U.S. Flag?"
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | TRACY SHRYER, Times Staff Writer
For the second time in a year, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago bowed to an organized protest over a provocative piece of art, closing a gallery Monday "until the school can resolve security and safety needs." The controversial work includes an American Flag on the floor of the gallery where creations by minority students at the school went on display last week. Veterans' groups charged it was a desecration of the flag.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Officials at an art institute excluded a controversial display of a U.S. flag draped on the floor from an exhibition because it would be too disruptive. The announcement today by Tony Jones, president of the institute, came one day before the off-campus exhibition was to be opened to the public. The work by Scott Tyler is titled "What Is the Proper Way to Display a U.S. Flag" and features the flag on the floor, allowing it to be walked upon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1989 | DAVID WHARTON, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County district attorney's office has determined that a CalArts student violated state law with his controversial American flag exhibit but does not plan to file charges against him, a spokesman said Wednesday. Adam Greene's exhibit, which stirred immediate anger and debate, featured a flag draped across the floor in the main lobby of the Valencia campus.
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