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April 21, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER and TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Residents of Uwajima, a town in western Japan that saw nine of its own killed when a U.S. submarine surfaced under a fishing school vessel in February, reacted with anger Friday as it became increasingly clear that the warship's commander will not face criminal charges under U.S. military law. "People here feel that without a court-martial we're never going to know who was really responsible," said Kayoko Yoneda, head of the Uwajima Victims Support Group. "That's why there's such frustration."
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WORLD
December 15, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The former skipper of a U.S. submarine that rammed and sank a Japanese fishing school boat last year paid a condolence call to Japan. Retired U.S. Navy Cmdr. Scott Waddle laid flowers at a memorial in Uwajima to offer his personal apology. Waddle was at the helm of the nuclear-powered Greeneville when it surfaced beneath the Ehime Maru on Feb. 9, 2001, sinking it off the coast of Hawaii. Nine of the 35 people aboard the training vessel died.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2001
Re "Sub Captain Says Civilians Hindered Crew," April 16: Taxpayers have shelled out a lot of money to train Cmdr. Scott Waddle to do what he does best: command a submarine. Give him a letter of reprimand and then give him back his ship. He has already paid a dear price for his actions, and you can be sure that he will never make that sort of mistake again. LARRY SHULMAN Beverly Hills
NEWS
September 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The former commander of the U.S. submarine that rammed and sank a Japanese fishing vessel will not visit Japan before he retires on Sept. 30, according to the Navy. Cmdr. Scott Waddle, former skipper of the Greeneville, will not go to Japan because officials there have indicated that "the time was not right" for him to visit, the Navy said in Honolulu.
NEWS
September 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The former commander of the U.S. submarine that rammed and sank a Japanese fishing vessel will not visit Japan before he retires on Sept. 30, according to the Navy. Cmdr. Scott Waddle, former skipper of the Greeneville, will not go to Japan because officials there have indicated that "the time was not right" for him to visit, the Navy said in Honolulu.
NEWS
April 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The commander of the U.S. attack submarine that collided with a Japanese trawler, killing nine people, will be formally asked to quit the Navy, an official said. Cmdr. Scott Waddle has been ordered to report to an "admiral's mast" administrative hearing today, the official said. Adm. Thomas Fargo, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, will discuss the findings of a court of inquiry--which urged Fargo to choose an administrative punishment--and Waddle's exit from the Navy.
WORLD
December 15, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The former skipper of a U.S. submarine that rammed and sank a Japanese fishing school boat last year paid a condolence call to Japan. Retired U.S. Navy Cmdr. Scott Waddle laid flowers at a memorial in Uwajima to offer his personal apology. Waddle was at the helm of the nuclear-powered Greeneville when it surfaced beneath the Ehime Maru on Feb. 9, 2001, sinking it off the coast of Hawaii. Nine of the 35 people aboard the training vessel died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2001
Re "Defense Begins to Take Shape in Submarine Crash Inquiry," March 12: Cmdr. Scott Waddle can say he wasn't at fault because of bad information from the crew. But one thing he is totally at fault for is the fact that after the accident happened he didn't give immediate assistance to the stricken boat. Why? They knew they hit something and that people were in trouble, but did the commander direct his men to a rescue and first aid? No. That could have meant the difference for those who didn't make it. Where is the apology for that?
NEWS
April 27, 2001 | Associated Press
Former Greeneville skipper Cmdr. Scott D. Waddle said Thursday that the Navy was right to end his 20-year career after his submarine sank a Japanese fishing vessel and killed nine people. "They were absolutely fair," said Waddle, appearing on CNN's "Larry King Live." "If I were in their position, I would take the same stance," he said. Wearing his dress white uniform, Waddle discussed for an hour the Feb. 9 sinking of the Ehime Maru.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2001
Re "Navy Panel Will Consider Charges Against Sub Crew," Feb. 18: Having served in the Army during WWII and the Korean thing, I had many opportunities to observe the brass and political interference in covering their collective butts. Now that the higher-ups are considering charges against Cmdr. Scott Waddle, Lt. Cmdr. Gerald K. Pfeifer and officer of the deck Lt. j.g. Michael J. Coen, I am wondering if this is a hunt for a scapegoat. Were the civilians there in the sub at the direct invitation of Waddle or were his superiors arranging all this as a PR event, and the commander had to follow orders and go along with it?
NEWS
April 27, 2001 | Associated Press
Former Greeneville skipper Cmdr. Scott D. Waddle said Thursday that the Navy was right to end his 20-year career after his submarine sank a Japanese fishing vessel and killed nine people. "They were absolutely fair," said Waddle, appearing on CNN's "Larry King Live." "If I were in their position, I would take the same stance," he said. Wearing his dress white uniform, Waddle discussed for an hour the Feb. 9 sinking of the Ehime Maru.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The skipper of the U.S. submarine that sank a Japanese fishing vessel was forced into retirement Monday by the Pacific Fleet's top admiral, who accused him of dereliction of duty in the collision that killed nine crew members and students on the trawler. Adm. Thomas Fargo told Cmdr. Scott D. Waddle that he could either retire--with full pension benefits--or face a "show-cause" hearing in which he would have to explain why he should not be booted out of the Navy because of the Feb.
NEWS
April 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The commander of the U.S. attack submarine that collided with a Japanese trawler, killing nine people, will be formally asked to quit the Navy, an official said. Cmdr. Scott Waddle has been ordered to report to an "admiral's mast" administrative hearing today, the official said. Adm. Thomas Fargo, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, will discuss the findings of a court of inquiry--which urged Fargo to choose an administrative punishment--and Waddle's exit from the Navy.
NEWS
April 21, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER and TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Residents of Uwajima, a town in western Japan that saw nine of its own killed when a U.S. submarine surfaced under a fishing school vessel in February, reacted with anger Friday as it became increasingly clear that the warship's commander will not face criminal charges under U.S. military law. "People here feel that without a court-martial we're never going to know who was really responsible," said Kayoko Yoneda, head of the Uwajima Victims Support Group. "That's why there's such frustration."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2001
Re "Sub Captain Says Civilians Hindered Crew," April 16: Taxpayers have shelled out a lot of money to train Cmdr. Scott Waddle to do what he does best: command a submarine. Give him a letter of reprimand and then give him back his ship. He has already paid a dear price for his actions, and you can be sure that he will never make that sort of mistake again. LARRY SHULMAN Beverly Hills
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top Navy admiral has decided against courts-martial in the Greeneville submarine disaster but will order the sub's captain to an administrative hearing that will force his departure from the service, Navy sources said Wednesday. In a decision that may be announced as soon as Friday, Adm. Thomas Fargo, commander of the Pacific Fleet, will conclude that the deadly collision between the submarine and a Japanese trawler was the result of unprofessional conduct by Cmdr.
NEWS
March 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
After apologies from President Bush and other top officials, the families of nine Japanese who are missing and presumed dead received the words of remorse they wanted most--from the captain of the U.S. submarine that scattered their loved ones at sea. Cmdr. Scott Waddle, whose submarine struck and sank a Japanese trawler off Hawaii on Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2001
The Navy's inquiry into the Feb. 9 sinking of a Japanese trawler by the submarine USS Greeneville is expected to go on for several weeks, but key testimony has already exposed a root cause of the tragedy. Had it not been for the presence aboard the sub of 16 civilian guests, the events that led to the ramming of the Ehime Maru off Hawaii almost certainly would not have occurred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2001
Re "Defense Begins to Take Shape in Submarine Crash Inquiry," March 12: Cmdr. Scott Waddle can say he wasn't at fault because of bad information from the crew. But one thing he is totally at fault for is the fact that after the accident happened he didn't give immediate assistance to the stricken boat. Why? They knew they hit something and that people were in trouble, but did the commander direct his men to a rescue and first aid? No. That could have meant the difference for those who didn't make it. Where is the apology for that?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2001
The Navy's inquiry into the Feb. 9 sinking of a Japanese trawler by the submarine USS Greeneville is expected to go on for several weeks, but key testimony has already exposed a root cause of the tragedy. Had it not been for the presence aboard the sub of 16 civilian guests, the events that led to the ramming of the Ehime Maru off Hawaii almost certainly would not have occurred.
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