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Scott Zacky

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OPINION
October 3, 1999
I disagree with your Sept. 28 editorial's position that L.A. County Sheriff Lee Baca and Orange County Sheriff Mike Carona should be working to contain the number of guns on the streets and shouldn't have "Baca buddies" playing sheriff. How many defenseless doctors, lawyers and judges have been gunned down in the past few years? Had these individuals been given the right to arm themselves as law-abiding citizens, they might still be alive today. Average citizens don't have armed bodyguards, as do corporate and county executives and movie celebrities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 12, 2012
"Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me," they used to say on the late Andy Griffith's eponymous 1960s TV show. Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca, whose folksy straight-man earnestness reminds us a bit of Griffith's Sheriff Andy Taylor, has actually been fooled three times when it comes to the issuance of official-looking badges or ID cards to non-department personnel. So here's a review: In 1999, Baca set up a special reserve program intended to allow celebrities and other notables to receive a badge and a gun in the name of boosting community relations.
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OPINION
July 12, 2012
"Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me," they used to say on the late Andy Griffith's eponymous 1960s TV show. Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca, whose folksy straight-man earnestness reminds us a bit of Griffith's Sheriff Andy Taylor, has actually been fooled three times when it comes to the issuance of official-looking badges or ID cards to non-department personnel. So here's a review: In 1999, Baca set up a special reserve program intended to allow celebrities and other notables to receive a badge and a gun in the name of boosting community relations.
OPINION
October 3, 1999
I disagree with your Sept. 28 editorial's position that L.A. County Sheriff Lee Baca and Orange County Sheriff Mike Carona should be working to contain the number of guns on the streets and shouldn't have "Baca buddies" playing sheriff. How many defenseless doctors, lawyers and judges have been gunned down in the past few years? Had these individuals been given the right to arm themselves as law-abiding citizens, they might still be alive today. Average citizens don't have armed bodyguards, as do corporate and county executives and movie celebrities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1999 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County sheriff's officials were so eager to avoid having to comply with a new state law that triples the amount of training required for reserve law enforcement officers that they rushed Sheriff Lee Baca's new "executive" recruits through their normal screening process, admitting one reservist who had been convicted of a weapons violation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1999
It's important that a sheriff have in his possession something even more crucial than his gun. That something is good judgment. Evidently this quality is lacking in the sheriffs of Los Angeles and Orange counties, who are handing out special gun privileges like bubble gum. Take Los Angeles Sheriff Lee Baca's so-called Executive Reserve Company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2000
The city attorney's office filed two misdemeanor counts against former Sheriff's Department celebrity reserve Scott Zacky on Thursday in a case stemming from an incident in which Zacky allegedly pointed a gun at a couple outside his Bel-Air home. Zacky, a member of the family that runs the Zacky Farms chicken firm, was charged with illegally brandishing a firearm and illegally using a laser targeting scope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1999 | From A Times Staff Writer
A former member of Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca's special celebrity reserve unit and an alleged accomplice were indicted by a federal grand jury Wednesday on suspicion of laundering about $225,000, the U.S. attorney announced. Elie Abdalnour, 36, of San Dimas, a wealthy Baca supporter, had been sworn in last June and given a badge and a gun by the department. He is the second member of the celebrity reserve unit to be arrested this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1999 | From a Times Staff Writer
A former member of Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca's special celebrity reserve unit and an associate from Anaheim were indicted by a federal grand jury in Santa Ana on Wednesday on suspicion of laundering about $225,000, the U.S. attorney announced. Elie Abdalnour, 36, of San Dimas, a wealthy Baca supporter who owns Cypress Jewelry Mart Inc., was sworn in in June and given a badge and a gun by the department. He is the second member of the celebrity reserve unit arrested this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1999 | Shawn Hubler
There is plenty to ask in the matter of Sheriff Lee Baca and his Very Important Posse, but perhaps the most basic question is: Why is there a posse to ask about at all? When we last heard from Baca, he was calling for gun control. So what's up with a sheriff who declares one day that "Los Angeles is not a frontier country," only to turn around a week later and issue Berettas and badges to a gaggle of businessmen and pals?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1999 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County sheriff's officials were so eager to avoid having to comply with a new state law that triples the amount of training required for reserve law enforcement officers that they rushed Sheriff Lee Baca's new "executive" recruits through their normal screening process, admitting one reservist who had been convicted of a weapons violation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2008 | Richard Winton and Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writers
A director of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department's Multicultural Advisory Council has been stripped of his reserve deputy status after Glendale police complained that he showed up at the scene of a suicide last week, flashing his badge and demanding access to a restricted area. The Glendale incident marks the latest in a string of cases in which reserve deputies or volunteers working for sheriff's departments around Southern California have been accused of overstepping their authority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1999 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca marked his first year in office Tuesday by listing many accomplishments, but acknowledging that he erred in issuing guns to members of his controversial celebrity reserve unit. Two weeks ago, Baca suspended the program after a second reservist was arrested, this time on federal money-laundering charges.
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