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Scottish Highlands

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TRAVEL
May 28, 1989 | RICHARD WIGHTMAN, Wightman is a free-lance writer living in Washington, D.C
The way some Britons from the past told it, few people wanted to set foot on Glen Coe, one of the most spectacular mountain enclaves in Great Britain. To Dorothy Wordsworth, who journeyed through the great Scottish gorge with her brother, William, in the early 19th Century, it seemed a "wild and desolate spot." To Charles Dickens, a few decades later, Glen Coe was "perfectly terrible . . . an awful place. If you should happen to have your hat on, take it off that your hair may stand on end."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2009 | Associated Press
Academy Award winner Tilda Swinton is spending part of the summer hauling a mobile movie theater across the Scottish Highlands. Swinton and fellow film fans are transporting the movie truck through towns and villages for a traveling film festival. Most of the time they drive, but volunteers are pulling the 40-ton truck for part of the journey on foot. Swinton told Monday's edition of the Guardian newspaper that audiences in remote communities were hungry for non-mainstream films and for an "experience of cinema" unavailable on DVD. The six-day event follows a film festival Swinton helped organize last year in her hometown of Nairn on Scotland's east coast.
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TRAVEL
June 14, 1987 | MARTI GERDES and DENIS PIMENTEL, Gerdes and Pimentel are Portland, Ore . , free-lance writers.
We woke up our first morning on the Highlander Pullman train cruise of Scotland still tired from the flight over and the busyness of London. But when we opened the blinds of our compartment, our spirits lifted: The Scottish Highlands were all around us, hardly inhabited and utterly lovely. Mist clung to the tops of the Cairngorm Mountains as they poured their lacework of rivulets into braes below. Geese flew overhead, and the countryside looked quiet and welcoming in the soft morning light.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He'll wear a pleated skirt of the Scottish Highlands variety. She may or may not wear the late Princess Grace of Monaco's tiara--depending whether you believe her official fan club Web site or Cartier. And staffers at the secluded Skibo Castle, where the wedding entourage will celebrate, reportedly are to be sequestered until well after the event.
MAGAZINE
October 16, 1994
Like Lewis Carroll's Alice, fashion has the power to suggest a parallel universe. Try on a tartan kilt and hear pipers marching to battle on the Scottish Highlands, or slip into a vinyl jumpsuit and envision docking at the nearest space station. Clothes can and do transport us. When paired with luxe fabrics such as silk, satin and velvet, exquisite pleats and shirring produce fantastical results. Wear one of these creations, and leave everything else to your imagination.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2009 | Associated Press
Academy Award winner Tilda Swinton is spending part of the summer hauling a mobile movie theater across the Scottish Highlands. Swinton and fellow film fans are transporting the movie truck through towns and villages for a traveling film festival. Most of the time they drive, but volunteers are pulling the 40-ton truck for part of the journey on foot. Swinton told Monday's edition of the Guardian newspaper that audiences in remote communities were hungry for non-mainstream films and for an "experience of cinema" unavailable on DVD. The six-day event follows a film festival Swinton helped organize last year in her hometown of Nairn on Scotland's east coast.
TRAVEL
June 4, 1989 | JACK ADLER
The canny Scots are offering a few bargains for the summer. Both Glasgow and Edinburgh will have city travel passes, and a Travelpass covers the Scottish Highlands. Prices for the Glasgow "Family Day Tripper" start at about $9 U.S. for one adult and up to two children, $16 for two adults and up to four children. They allow you to take as many bus and train trips as you want in a single day. The pass covers Glasgow and nearby places such as Girvan, Dumbarton Castle, Loch Lomond and Strathclyde Park.
TRAVEL
April 30, 1989
Gena Reisner's story, "Scotland By Train" (April 2), was most interesting, especially (in mentioning) the Royal Scotsman. In celebration of our 50th wedding anniversary, my wife and I took the six-day tour. Words cannot describe the luxury of this train. We had a stateroom, including all private facilities. The dining car was used by Earl Haig in World War I. The train includes carriages from the late Victorian and Edwardian periods and is limited to 28 people. And side trips to such things as historic sites and castles not open to the public are arranged.
TRAVEL
November 23, 1986
About three years ago Travel ran an article about David Dean's coach tours of the Scottish Highlands. I kept the article, and in September spent a thoroughly enjoyable week on his tour of Harris, Lewis, Skye and Ullapool. Pamela (the buses have names) was a vintage early '60s coach, old enough to echo the elegant days of British postwar touring, which means comfortable seats (three across), plenty of leg room, excellent visibility and, most importantly, the ability to navigate the often primitive roads of the north.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Highlander: Endgame" brings the popular, Gothic, supernatural fantasy-adventure series to a spectacular finish--but leaving immortality with a really bad name. That's because Christopher Lambert's Connor MacLeod and his younger clansman, Duncan (Adrian Paul, who starred in the "Highlander" TV series), seem to spend most of their limitless time in bloody combat, fighting off bad guys across the centuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Highlander: Endgame" brings the popular, Gothic, supernatural fantasy-adventure series to a spectacular finish--but leaving immortality with a really bad name. That's because Christopher Lambert's Connor MacLeod and his younger clansman, Duncan (Adrian Paul, who starred in the "Highlander" TV series), seem to spend most of their limitless time in bloody combat, fighting off bad guys across the centuries.
MAGAZINE
October 16, 1994
Like Lewis Carroll's Alice, fashion has the power to suggest a parallel universe. Try on a tartan kilt and hear pipers marching to battle on the Scottish Highlands, or slip into a vinyl jumpsuit and envision docking at the nearest space station. Clothes can and do transport us. When paired with luxe fabrics such as silk, satin and velvet, exquisite pleats and shirring produce fantastical results. Wear one of these creations, and leave everything else to your imagination.
MAGAZINE
May 15, 1994 | Ted Botha, Ted Botha is a free-lance writer based in Cape Town, S. Africa. He has written for such publications as Outside, the Wine Spectator and the (London) Sunday Telegraph.
OUTSIDE KYLE OF TONGUE, MY CYCLING mate, Haddon Curtis, left the road and took flight. It looked pretty sensational, really. Having freewheeled down one of those hills that make the Scottish Highlands both a pleasure and a struggle to cycle, he had reached the bottom, let out his usual manic yell of excitement and then, instead of stopping, careened over an embankment. Haddon's Puch rocketed one way, Haddon's pannier another and Haddon himself a third. Then they all disappeared.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1989 | JAN BRESLAUER
Scotophiles from hither and yon came to the Anaheim Convention Center Saturday to watch the 90 bonnie laddies of The Black Watch and the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders perform as part of their 250th Anniversary North American tour. While the music was standard parade fare, unremarkable in this acoustically dismal setting, and there was only a soupcon of dance, there certainly was pomp aplenty.
TRAVEL
June 4, 1989 | JACK ADLER
The canny Scots are offering a few bargains for the summer. Both Glasgow and Edinburgh will have city travel passes, and a Travelpass covers the Scottish Highlands. Prices for the Glasgow "Family Day Tripper" start at about $9 U.S. for one adult and up to two children, $16 for two adults and up to four children. They allow you to take as many bus and train trips as you want in a single day. The pass covers Glasgow and nearby places such as Girvan, Dumbarton Castle, Loch Lomond and Strathclyde Park.
TRAVEL
May 28, 1989 | RICHARD WIGHTMAN, Wightman is a free-lance writer living in Washington, D.C
The way some Britons from the past told it, few people wanted to set foot on Glen Coe, one of the most spectacular mountain enclaves in Great Britain. To Dorothy Wordsworth, who journeyed through the great Scottish gorge with her brother, William, in the early 19th Century, it seemed a "wild and desolate spot." To Charles Dickens, a few decades later, Glen Coe was "perfectly terrible . . . an awful place. If you should happen to have your hat on, take it off that your hair may stand on end."
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He'll wear a pleated skirt of the Scottish Highlands variety. She may or may not wear the late Princess Grace of Monaco's tiara--depending whether you believe her official fan club Web site or Cartier. And staffers at the secluded Skibo Castle, where the wedding entourage will celebrate, reportedly are to be sequestered until well after the event.
TRAVEL
April 30, 1989
Gena Reisner's story, "Scotland By Train" (April 2), was most interesting, especially (in mentioning) the Royal Scotsman. In celebration of our 50th wedding anniversary, my wife and I took the six-day tour. Words cannot describe the luxury of this train. We had a stateroom, including all private facilities. The dining car was used by Earl Haig in World War I. The train includes carriages from the late Victorian and Edwardian periods and is limited to 28 people. And side trips to such things as historic sites and castles not open to the public are arranged.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | COTTEN TIMBERLAKE, Associated Press
On these isolated hillsides overlooking Loch Carron, the dramatic quiet is interrupted by crofter Angus MacRae calling out to his herding collies in their own private language and by the excited bleating of sheep expecting to be fed. Here in Scotland's western Highlands, far from the rest of the world, a unique and ancient way of life called crofting, small tenant farming, endures despite threats from many sides--new taxes, competition from agribusiness and the encroachment of vacationers.
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