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June 13, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Sean Connery will offer the first public glimpse of his memoirs at this year's Edinburgh Book Festival, organizers announced Thursday. The former James Bond star, a high-profile Scottish nationalist, will launch "Being a Scot" on Aug. 25, his 78th birthday. The first -- and, many say, the best -- actor to play 007 on the big screen, Connery is a vocal supporter of the pro-independence Scottish National Party. He lives in the Bahamas and has said he will not reside in Scotland until it gains independence from Britain.
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WORLD
February 13, 2014 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Escalating the fight against secession, the British government warned Thursday that Scotland would lose the right to continue using the pound as its currency if voters there say yes to a historic referendum on independence this fall. “The pound isn't an asset to be divided up between two countries after a breakup as if it were a CD collection,” Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne said. “The people of the rest of the U.K. [United Kingdom] wouldn't accept it, and Parliament wouldn't pass it. ... If Scotland walks away from the U.K., it walks away from the pound.” Osborne's stark warning, delivered in a speech in Edinburgh, the Scottish capital, represented a new willingness by unionists to take a hard line in persuading Scottish voters to shun independence in a September plebiscite.
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WORLD
May 4, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Britain's Labor Party was facing one of its toughest election challenges in a decade today, after voters delivered what is widely seen as a last referendum on Prime Minister Tony Blair's government. Early returns from Thursday's vote offered few hints of a decisive outcome in a contest likely to determine the future of the Scottish independence movement and provide a window on Britain's political future after Blair.
WORLD
April 4, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Amid international alarm over saber-rattling by North Korea, British Prime Minister David Cameron made an impassioned defense Thursday for maintaining his country's independent nuclear deterrent, despite growing domestic complaints of excessive cost during an era of drastic budget cuts. Cameron said that atomic threats to Britain's security are now even more worrisome than during the Cold War because of rogue states such as North Korea and Iran, both of which are believed to be trying to develop nuclear weapons.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE, The Baltimore Sun
Scottish nationalists were celebrating Friday a stunning victory in a special parliamentary election that produced one of the largest electoral reversals in postwar British history. The Scottish National Party overcame a previously huge Labor Party majority to win the parliamentary seat representing the Glasgow constituency of Govan. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's ruling Tories, who control only 10 of Scotland's 72 parliamentary seats, came in a distant third.
NEWS
April 8, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ruling Conservative Party reeled Friday after being shut out in Scotland's local elections--a disastrous loss that threatens the party leadership of Prime Minister John Major. In voting Thursday, the Conservatives failed to win control of any of 29 new city councils and took only 79 of 1,100 available council seats. The opposition Labor Party, by contrast, took 20 councils, while Scottish nationalists and independents split the rest.
WORLD
February 13, 2014 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Escalating the fight against secession, the British government warned Thursday that Scotland would lose the right to continue using the pound as its currency if voters there say yes to a historic referendum on independence this fall. “The pound isn't an asset to be divided up between two countries after a breakup as if it were a CD collection,” Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne said. “The people of the rest of the U.K. [United Kingdom] wouldn't accept it, and Parliament wouldn't pass it. ... If Scotland walks away from the U.K., it walks away from the pound.” Osborne's stark warning, delivered in a speech in Edinburgh, the Scottish capital, represented a new willingness by unionists to take a hard line in persuading Scottish voters to shun independence in a September plebiscite.
WORLD
April 4, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Amid international alarm over saber-rattling by North Korea, British Prime Minister David Cameron made an impassioned defense Thursday for maintaining his country's independent nuclear deterrent, despite growing domestic complaints of excessive cost during an era of drastic budget cuts. Cameron said that atomic threats to Britain's security are now even more worrisome than during the Cold War because of rogue states such as North Korea and Iran, both of which are believed to be trying to develop nuclear weapons.
WORLD
May 5, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Scottish nationalists who are pushing for independence pulled ahead Friday to an unprecedented victory in the Scottish Parliament and said they would seek to form a coalition government committed "to all the people of this ancient and proud nation of Scotland." Amid chaotic vote counting that saw up to 100,000 ballots disqualified, the Scottish National Party gained 20 seats, leaving it with a total of 47 in the 129-seat assembly.
WORLD
February 16, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
The date for a referendum hasn't even been set. But Prime Minister David Cameron made an impassioned appeal directly to the Scottish people Thursday to keep Britain intact, imploring them to vote no on the question of whether Scotland should become an independent country. "Of course Scotland could govern itself. So could England," Cameron declared in Edinburgh, the Scottish capital. "My point is that we do it so much better together. " In a dog-eat-dog world, he said, the Scots would be better off remaining joined to England, Wales and Northern Ireland under the shelter of collective British diplomatic, military and economic might.
WORLD
October 15, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - The people of Scotland will decide in 2014 whether to stay yoked to England and Wales or become an independent nation after more than 300 years of sometimes resentful marriage. With a handshake and their signatures, British Prime Minister David Cameron and Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond sealed a deal Monday on a referendum that could see the biggest political shake-up in the British Isles since Ireland threw off British rule nearly a century ago. Under the agreement, Scottish voters will get their chance to say yes or no to remaining part of the United Kingdom in a ballot most likely to be held in the autumn of 2014.
WORLD
February 16, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
The date for a referendum hasn't even been set. But Prime Minister David Cameron made an impassioned appeal directly to the Scottish people Thursday to keep Britain intact, imploring them to vote no on the question of whether Scotland should become an independent country. "Of course Scotland could govern itself. So could England," Cameron declared in Edinburgh, the Scottish capital. "My point is that we do it so much better together. " In a dog-eat-dog world, he said, the Scots would be better off remaining joined to England, Wales and Northern Ireland under the shelter of collective British diplomatic, military and economic might.
WORLD
February 9, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
This castled city where highlands and lowlands meet has been fought over many times by the Scots and the English, never more bloodily than in the 13th century battle depicted in the Oscar-winning movie "Braveheart. " Now Alasdair MacPherson hopes to see this former capital of the kingdom of Scotland back in his countrymen's hands without a single shot fired. In the biggest test of British unity in decades, Scotland is on the verge of being granted the right to hold a referendum on whether to secede from the United Kingdom, putting asunder more than 300 years of marriage to England and Wales.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Sean Connery will offer the first public glimpse of his memoirs at this year's Edinburgh Book Festival, organizers announced Thursday. The former James Bond star, a high-profile Scottish nationalist, will launch "Being a Scot" on Aug. 25, his 78th birthday. The first -- and, many say, the best -- actor to play 007 on the big screen, Connery is a vocal supporter of the pro-independence Scottish National Party. He lives in the Bahamas and has said he will not reside in Scotland until it gains independence from Britain.
WORLD
May 5, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Scottish nationalists who are pushing for independence pulled ahead Friday to an unprecedented victory in the Scottish Parliament and said they would seek to form a coalition government committed "to all the people of this ancient and proud nation of Scotland." Amid chaotic vote counting that saw up to 100,000 ballots disqualified, the Scottish National Party gained 20 seats, leaving it with a total of 47 in the 129-seat assembly.
WORLD
May 4, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Britain's Labor Party was facing one of its toughest election challenges in a decade today, after voters delivered what is widely seen as a last referendum on Prime Minister Tony Blair's government. Early returns from Thursday's vote offered few hints of a decisive outcome in a contest likely to determine the future of the Scottish independence movement and provide a window on Britain's political future after Blair.
WORLD
October 15, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - The people of Scotland will decide in 2014 whether to stay yoked to England and Wales or become an independent nation after more than 300 years of sometimes resentful marriage. With a handshake and their signatures, British Prime Minister David Cameron and Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond sealed a deal Monday on a referendum that could see the biggest political shake-up in the British Isles since Ireland threw off British rule nearly a century ago. Under the agreement, Scottish voters will get their chance to say yes or no to remaining part of the United Kingdom in a ballot most likely to be held in the autumn of 2014.
WORLD
May 2, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
It was on the low cliffs looming over the white-capped Firth of Forth here that Alexander III, the last of Scotland's Celtic kings, plunged from his horse to his death one inky night 721 years ago. England backed a successor, and ultimately invaded, touching off the wars of Scottish independence that inspired medieval verses about refusing to submit to "the bonds of slavery entwined" and opulently tragic films such as "Braveheart."
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