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NEWS
February 18, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Scotland's first parliament in 300 years will meet for the first time May 12 and be officially inaugurated by Queen Elizabeth II on July 1, the British government announced. At their first meeting in Edinburgh, the 129 members of the new parliament, to be elected May 6, will choose a presiding officer, who will act as speaker, and a deputy presiding officer.
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WORLD
November 26, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - An independent Scotland would be richer, fairer and nuclear-free but would keep the British pound, the queen and membership in the European Union and NATO, the Scottish government pledged Tuesday, laying out its most comprehensive blueprint for secession from Britain. With less than a year before Scotland votes on whether to seek a divorce from England and Wales, campaigners for the "yes" side released a 670-page document outlining the practicalities and priorities of independence, addressing topics as diverse as currency arrangements and the provision of free child care for all preschoolers.
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TRAVEL
December 18, 2005 | John Lee, Special to The Times
IT was 2 p.m. on one of those brooding, rain-soaked winter days when it's hard to even remember what sunlight looks like. As I approached the doors of Edinburgh's new Scottish Parliament building, a crowd was milling around the main entrance, a few dozen were clearing airport-style security checks inside, and several hundred seemed to be hanging around in the building's cavernous lobby. If bad weather is supposed to keep people at home, someone had forgotten to tell these folks.
WORLD
September 18, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Exactly a year before Scotland decides whether to remain part of Great Britain or go it alone, supporters of independence clashed Wednesday with those who want to stay in the British fold, heralding 12 months of searching debate over fundamental notions of national identity. Scottish voters go to the polls Sept. 18, 2014, in a historic referendum that could radically redraw the political map of the British Isles. First Minister Alex Salmond, an ardent nationalist, said the time had come for Scotland to break away from England and Wales and claim sovereignty over weighty matters of state, from defense to education, without interference from the central British government in London.
OPINION
May 7, 2007
THE FIRST-PLACE FINISH of a pro-independence party in elections for the Scottish Parliament doesn't mean that the northernmost nation of the United Kingdom is about to break away, any more than the triumph of French separatists in Quebec's elections 31 years ago led to the crack-up of Canada. Some of the defections from the Labor Party to the Scottish Nationalist Party probably reflect disaffection with lame-duck Prime Minister Tony Blair more than any endorsement of independence.
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When is a country a country? Scotland has its own legal and educational systems, its own national museums and soccer leagues. It has a border with England--unchanged for centuries--and today, Scotland will elect its first parliament in nearly 300 years. The Scots even call their land a country, but it is not an independent state.
NEWS
May 28, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After dreaming of their own government for nearly three centuries, it was probably inevitable that Scots would find the nuts-and-bolts reality of the new Scottish Parliament something less than a dream come true. And known, as they are, for refusing to suffer fools, Scots were not likely to give rave reviews to a corps of 129 politicians, most of whom are first-time legislators.
OPINION
April 5, 2008 | Sean Connery, Sean Connery was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2000 and is an Academy Award winner who has appeared in more than 60 films.
There are few more cherished American ideals than independence. As we prepare to celebrate Tartan Day, established as April 6 by a U.S. Senate resolution in 1998 to commemorate one of the inspirations for the Declaration of Independence -- Scotland's Declaration of Arbroath -- it is as good a time as any to tell the uniquely Scottish story of independence. In 1320, Scots penned the Declaration of Arbroath.
NEWS
September 12, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With prideful nationalism, Scots on Thursday voted for self-rule and the creation of their first Parliament in three centuries. Official results today from a national referendum echoed the universal predictions of polls and pundits: a landslide "Yes" for the Parliament. There was also strong support for a second "Yes"--to give the Parliament tax-making powers.
NEWS
September 13, 1997 | From Reuters
Edinburgh brimmed with joy and confidence Friday after Scots voted resoundingly to form a Parliament in their capital after 290 years without one. Jubilation was clear as patriotic flags appeared in windows overnight and a huge Scottish St. Andrews flag with a diagonal white cross on a dark blue background was draped around the headquarters of the Scottish National Party.
OPINION
October 22, 2012
'Braveheart" will have his revenge. That's how some fervent Scottish nationalists will portray the announcement last week that the British government has approved a referendum on whether Scotland will end its 300-year-old formal union with England. Meeting in Edinburgh, British Prime Minister David Cameron and Alex Salmond, Scotland's pro-independence first minister, agreed that residents of Scotland -- including 16- and 17-year olds -- would decide the issue in a 2014 plebiscite. For Americans, schooled by the outcome of our Civil War to consider secession unthinkable, the willingness of the British government to see itself potentially dismembered is remarkable.
WORLD
October 15, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - The people of Scotland will decide in 2014 whether to stay yoked to England and Wales or become an independent nation after more than 300 years of sometimes resentful marriage. With a handshake and their signatures, British Prime Minister David Cameron and Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond sealed a deal Monday on a referendum that could see the biggest political shake-up in the British Isles since Ireland threw off British rule nearly a century ago. Under the agreement, Scottish voters will get their chance to say yes or no to remaining part of the United Kingdom in a ballot most likely to be held in the autumn of 2014.
WORLD
September 22, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - Ask a pundit who Britain's savviest politician is, and there's a good chance the name that comes back won't belong to someone who haunts the halls of power here in London. Instead, the accolade might well go to Alex Salmond, the head of Scotland's semiautonomous government in Edinburgh. Last year, voters north of the English border gave Salmond's Scottish National Party, or SNP, an astonishing majority in the Scottish Parliament, instantly transforming the political landscape and turning First Minister Salmond into one of Britain's most powerful leaders.
OPINION
April 5, 2008 | Sean Connery, Sean Connery was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2000 and is an Academy Award winner who has appeared in more than 60 films.
There are few more cherished American ideals than independence. As we prepare to celebrate Tartan Day, established as April 6 by a U.S. Senate resolution in 1998 to commemorate one of the inspirations for the Declaration of Independence -- Scotland's Declaration of Arbroath -- it is as good a time as any to tell the uniquely Scottish story of independence. In 1320, Scots penned the Declaration of Arbroath.
OPINION
May 7, 2007
THE FIRST-PLACE FINISH of a pro-independence party in elections for the Scottish Parliament doesn't mean that the northernmost nation of the United Kingdom is about to break away, any more than the triumph of French separatists in Quebec's elections 31 years ago led to the crack-up of Canada. Some of the defections from the Labor Party to the Scottish Nationalist Party probably reflect disaffection with lame-duck Prime Minister Tony Blair more than any endorsement of independence.
WORLD
May 5, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Scottish nationalists who are pushing for independence pulled ahead Friday to an unprecedented victory in the Scottish Parliament and said they would seek to form a coalition government committed "to all the people of this ancient and proud nation of Scotland." Amid chaotic vote counting that saw up to 100,000 ballots disqualified, the Scottish National Party gained 20 seats, leaving it with a total of 47 in the 129-seat assembly.
WORLD
September 22, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - Ask a pundit who Britain's savviest politician is, and there's a good chance the name that comes back won't belong to someone who haunts the halls of power here in London. Instead, the accolade might well go to Alex Salmond, the head of Scotland's semiautonomous government in Edinburgh. Last year, voters north of the English border gave Salmond's Scottish National Party, or SNP, an astonishing majority in the Scottish Parliament, instantly transforming the political landscape and turning First Minister Salmond into one of Britain's most powerful leaders.
WORLD
October 15, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - The people of Scotland will decide in 2014 whether to stay yoked to England and Wales or become an independent nation after more than 300 years of sometimes resentful marriage. With a handshake and their signatures, British Prime Minister David Cameron and Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond sealed a deal Monday on a referendum that could see the biggest political shake-up in the British Isles since Ireland threw off British rule nearly a century ago. Under the agreement, Scottish voters will get their chance to say yes or no to remaining part of the United Kingdom in a ballot most likely to be held in the autumn of 2014.
TRAVEL
December 18, 2005 | John Lee, Special to The Times
IT was 2 p.m. on one of those brooding, rain-soaked winter days when it's hard to even remember what sunlight looks like. As I approached the doors of Edinburgh's new Scottish Parliament building, a crowd was milling around the main entrance, a few dozen were clearing airport-style security checks inside, and several hundred seemed to be hanging around in the building's cavernous lobby. If bad weather is supposed to keep people at home, someone had forgotten to tell these folks.
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