Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScottsboro Boys
IN THE NEWS

Scottsboro Boys

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
November 21, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The Alabama parole board on Thursday granted posthumous pardons in the "Scottsboro Boys" rape case, seeking to correct one of the more infamous racist cases that scarred the Deep South in the 1930s and that has reverberated through the nation's consciousness ever since. The board unanimously approved a petition granting a posthumous pardon to three of the group who still had convictions on their records. The pardons had been expected since the Alabama Legislature passed a law in the spring to allow the board to grant pardons for crimes older than 75 years - a move specifically directed at closing the last part of the case.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
If you liked "wilding," you're gonna love the "knockout game. " I have just become aware, thanks to Fox News and an author who publishes under the conspiracy-minded World Net Daily imprint, that roving gangs of black adolescents are marauding through our streets, randomly attacking innocent white victims in a racist ritual known as the "knockout game. " The motive is mischief, not robbery. These impeccable sources also claim the mainstream media, in a woeful act of political correctness, refuse to report the racial nature of this crime wave.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"The Scottsboro Boys" has finally arrived in Los Angeles, a year after this 2010 Broadway musical performed in San Diego and San Francisco. It shouldn't have taken this long, but don't miss the opportunity to catch one of the most inventive American musicals to come around in a long while. The show, which opened Wednesday at the Ahmanson Theatre, is a sophisticated knockout, a musical for those who like their razzle-dazzle with a radical, unsentimental edge. The subject matter is the opposite of upbeat, but "The Scottsboro Boys" reminds us that remembrance can be a kind of redress, that not letting evil escape into oblivion can be a partial victory.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The Alabama parole board on Thursday granted posthumous pardons in the "Scottsboro Boys" rape case, seeking to correct one of the more infamous racist cases that scarred the Deep South in the 1930s and that has reverberated through the nation's consciousness ever since. The board unanimously approved a petition granting a posthumous pardon to three of the group who still had convictions on their records. The pardons had been expected since the Alabama Legislature passed a law in the spring to allow the board to grant pardons for crimes older than 75 years - a move specifically directed at closing the last part of the case.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2010 | By Barbara Isenberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
? It all started at lyricist Fred Ebb's kitchen table about eight years ago. Ebb and composer John Kander, the legendary songwriting team that crafted celebrated scores for "Chicago," "Cabaret" and nearly a dozen other Broadway shows, were ready to start a new show, and so were their frequent collaborators, director Susan Stroman and librettist David Thompson. As the four friends talked first about the Depression, in which two of their earlier musicals were set, then about great American trials, they returned again and again to the infamous Scottsboro Boys case.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Clarence Norris, the last of the so-called "Scottsboro Boys," the nine teen-age black youths accused of raping two Southern white women in the 1930s, has died. Norris, who wept openly when he was pardoned in 1976, was 76 and died Monday at Bronx Community Hospital in New York City. Death was attributed by a hospital spokesman to a "long illness." (United Press International reported he had been in a nursing home for the last two years suffering from a variety of ailments.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2012 | By Chris Barton
It seems a career path has emerged for rockers looking to transition gracefully into musical maturity once the amplifiers have stopped buzzing in their ears. With Rod Stewart and and even Iggy Pop having lent their voice to the exploration of pop standards in recent years -- Stewart seems particularly enamored with the transition, given his seemingly endless "Great American Songbook" series -- why wouldn't a one-time shock-rocker like Dee Snider follow suit? Released Tuesday, "Dee Does Broadway" finds the one-time frontman for Twisted Sister leaping into the Great White Way's songbook with both feet, albeit with his taste for metal intact with  arrangements that recall theater-ready rock operas.
BOOKS
May 22, 1994 | CHRIS GOODRICH
STORIES OF SCOTTSBORO: The Rape Case that Shocked 1930's America and Revived the Struggle for Equality by James Goodman (Pantheon: $27.50; 465 pp.). "When I hear the word culture ," Hermann Goering is supposed to have said, "I reach for my pistol." The reader is likely to have a similar reaction while perusing "Stories of Scottsboro," only the hot-button concept in this book is "states rights" and its remedy, federal law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
If you liked "wilding," you're gonna love the "knockout game. " I have just become aware, thanks to Fox News and an author who publishes under the conspiracy-minded World Net Daily imprint, that roving gangs of black adolescents are marauding through our streets, randomly attacking innocent white victims in a racist ritual known as the "knockout game. " The motive is mischief, not robbery. These impeccable sources also claim the mainstream media, in a woeful act of political correctness, refuse to report the racial nature of this crime wave.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
“Les Miserables” will be hitting Broadway again - and for far longer than “one day more.” A revival of the uber-popular musical will open in March 14 at Manhattan's Imperial Theatre, said producer Cameron Mackintosh. It's part of the current “Les Mis” U.S. tour, which kicked off in 2010. This will be “Les Mis'” third time on Broadway - it ran for almost 13 years at the Imperial starting in 1990. It debuted -- and enjoyed a three-year run -- at the Broadway Theatre in 1987.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2013 | Matthew Teague
FAIRHOPE, Ala. - The state of Alabama can't rewrite a history shot through with hate and violence, but with the help of one determined woman it has added a postscript. On Thursday, Alabama's parole board pardoned the last of the long-dead Scottsboro Boys, nine black teenagers falsely accused of rape in 1931. Their case was monumental. It divided some residents here and united others, led to two landmark Supreme Court decisions, and precipitated the civil rights movement in the decades that followed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
South Coast Repertory announced the lineup for its 50th season Thursday - and it includes the mix of new and recent works, classics and modern masterpieces they are known for. Among the highlights: Arthur Miller's “Death of a Salesman,” directed by the company's artistic director, Marc Masterson, with an all-black cast, starring Charlie Robinson as Willy Loman and the world premiere of the SCR-commissioned “Rest” by Samuel D. Hunter, which...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
“Les Miserables” will be hitting Broadway again - and for far longer than “one day more.” A revival of the uber-popular musical will open in March 14 at Manhattan's Imperial Theatre, said producer Cameron Mackintosh. It's part of the current “Les Mis” U.S. tour, which kicked off in 2010. This will be “Les Mis'” third time on Broadway - it ran for almost 13 years at the Imperial starting in 1990. It debuted -- and enjoyed a three-year run -- at the Broadway Theatre in 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Ellen Olivier
As she entered the Ahmanson Theatre at the Music Center on Wednesday for opening night of “The Scottsboro Boys,” Paula Abdul said she was excited to see the show. A musical theater fan, Abdul said, “I go to everything in New York,” adding that she wished theater could be a more dominant part of the Los Angeles scene. The crowd also included actors Angela Bassett, Regina King of “Southland,” Kym Whitley of “Sparks,” Dawnn Lewis of “A Different World,” Kearran Giovanni of “Major Crimes,” Calvin Sykes of “Funny People," Jason George of “Grey's Anatomy,” and singer Kenny Lattimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"The Scottsboro Boys" has finally arrived in Los Angeles, a year after this 2010 Broadway musical performed in San Diego and San Francisco. It shouldn't have taken this long, but don't miss the opportunity to catch one of the most inventive American musicals to come around in a long while. The show, which opened Wednesday at the Ahmanson Theatre, is a sophisticated knockout, a musical for those who like their razzle-dazzle with a radical, unsentimental edge. The subject matter is the opposite of upbeat, but "The Scottsboro Boys" reminds us that remembrance can be a kind of redress, that not letting evil escape into oblivion can be a partial victory.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Barbara Isenberg
Actor Joshua Henry admits he didn't know much about the Scottsboro defendants before auditioning to play one of them in the musical "The Scottsboro Boys. " But the scenes he received to prepare for that audition were powerful. As for the "gorgeous" song excerpts from songwriters John Kander and Fred Ebb, Henry says, "I thought to myself, 'I'd like to be singing these songs eight times a week.'" He did just that when "The Scottsboro Boys" was on Broadway in fall 2010, and he'll be singing them again when the show opens at the Ahmanson Theatre on Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
South Coast Repertory announced the lineup for its 50th season Thursday - and it includes the mix of new and recent works, classics and modern masterpieces they are known for. Among the highlights: Arthur Miller's “Death of a Salesman,” directed by the company's artistic director, Marc Masterson, with an all-black cast, starring Charlie Robinson as Willy Loman and the world premiere of the SCR-commissioned “Rest” by Samuel D. Hunter, which...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2012 | By Chris Barton
It seems a career path has emerged for rockers looking to transition gracefully into musical maturity once the amplifiers have stopped buzzing in their ears. With Rod Stewart and and even Iggy Pop having lent their voice to the exploration of pop standards in recent years -- Stewart seems particularly enamored with the transition, given his seemingly endless "Great American Songbook" series -- why wouldn't a one-time shock-rocker like Dee Snider follow suit? Released Tuesday, "Dee Does Broadway" finds the one-time frontman for Twisted Sister leaping into the Great White Way's songbook with both feet, albeit with his taste for metal intact with  arrangements that recall theater-ready rock operas.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|