Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScotty Moore
IN THE NEWS

Scotty Moore

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scotty Moore may be the single most influential guitarist in rock 'n' roll--the guy who not only created the mold on the extraordinary records he made with Elvis Presley in the mid-1950s, but without whom Elvis himself may very well have remained a talented but unfocused hillbilly singer from Tupelo, Miss. Yet as important an instrumentalist as he is, during the 23 years he toured and recorded with Presley and in the 23 years since Presley's death, Moore never made a solo record.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scotty Moore may be the single most influential guitarist in rock 'n' roll--the guy who not only created the mold on the extraordinary records he made with Elvis Presley in the mid-1950s, but without whom Elvis himself may very well have remained a talented but unfocused hillbilly singer from Tupelo, Miss. Yet as important an instrumentalist as he is, during the 23 years he toured and recorded with Presley and in the 23 years since Presley's death, Moore never made a solo record.
Advertisement
BOOKS
August 17, 1997 | SARAH VOWELL, Sarah Vowell is the author of "Radio On" and music columnist for the Internet magazine Salon
The other day, I crashed my grocery cart smack dab into the cardboard face of Elvis. A special display of the video of the " '68 Comeback Special" was blocking an aisle next to the pancake mix, and since I'd never owned it, I tossed a tape on top of the bananas, thinking the whole Mr. Presley-Mrs. Butterworth's convergence made perfect sense. Because Elvis, like the supermarket, is all about inspiring hunger and desire and bodily want. And of all the Elvises, the nervous, leather-clad rocker inside the "Comeback" box has always been my favorite, offering his sweaty flesh and blood to his fans in a kind of lewd communion.
BOOKS
August 17, 1997 | SARAH VOWELL, Sarah Vowell is the author of "Radio On" and music columnist for the Internet magazine Salon
The other day, I crashed my grocery cart smack dab into the cardboard face of Elvis. A special display of the video of the " '68 Comeback Special" was blocking an aisle next to the pancake mix, and since I'd never owned it, I tossed a tape on top of the bananas, thinking the whole Mr. Presley-Mrs. Butterworth's convergence made perfect sense. Because Elvis, like the supermarket, is all about inspiring hunger and desire and bodily want. And of all the Elvises, the nervous, leather-clad rocker inside the "Comeback" box has always been my favorite, offering his sweaty flesh and blood to his fans in a kind of lewd communion.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1997 | DON SNOWDEN
The Bay Area guitarist is joined by six-string guests ranging from Bonnie Raitt and Buddy Guy to Taj Mahal and rockabilly legend Scotty Moore. But it's Walker's high-pitched vocals and his versatile songwriting that dominate "Great Guitars." Walker, who appears Friday at the Ash Grove, isn't flashy, but he's matured into a top-flight bluesman. Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (excellent).
NEWS
October 11, 1994 | From Newsday
Danny Gatton, who long held a reputation among musicians and in the music press as "the world's greatest unknown guitarist," has died of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound. He was 49. Gatton died Oct. 4 at his home in southern Maryland. The guitarist gained national recognition with a 1991 Grammy award nomination for best rock instrumental performance for the album "88 Elmira Street," but for most of his career languished in relative obscurity. A legend in the Washington, D.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM
In a sequel to one of last year's most enjoyable and conceptually savvy daylong rock festivals, Hootenanny '97 will play again at Oak Canyon Ranch in Santiago Canyon. It brings together some of rock's key originators along with younger traditionalists and some rambunctious modern-rockers who have one foot in punk and another in roots-rock tradition. Headlining the July 5 concert are a couple of rock's founding cornerstones, Chuck Berry and the guitar-and-drums duo of Scotty Moore and D.J.
NEWS
August 5, 1997 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elvis Presley may have permanently left the building 20 years ago this month, but the King of Rock 'n' Roll has never gone away. More than 300 books have been published about the show business phenomenon who was found dead in his fabled Memphis mansion Aug. 16, 1977. There have been books by Elvis' relatives, former lovers, members of his inner circle known as the "Memphis Mafia" and ex-wife Priscilla.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1997
Hercules had the Augean stable to clean. Craig McGahey has the reputation of Club Mesa. The Costa Mesa nightclub's stature as a grass-roots rock venue collapsed in the mid-'90s as it became known as a haven for racist skinheads who threw their weight around along with their rancid opinions. "Club Nazi" became its informal nickname among the local alt-rock cognoscenti. Now promoter McGahey aims to restore the club's good name. His history as a promoter on the O.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2000
SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO 8pm Pop Music Speaking of this year's Hootenanny, while many of the acts had the pomaded crowd cheering, only one had them in awe: Scotty Moore, the seminal guitarist who helped create the sound of rock 'n' roll in the astounding Sun Records sessions he did in the 1950s with Elvis Presley and bassist Bill Black. Moore returns, sitting in again with latter-day rockabilly bassist Lee Rocker, for this show in San Juan Capistrano.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|