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Scour Inc

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BUSINESS
November 17, 2000 | P.J. Huffstutter
Scour Inc., the music-swapping Beverly Hills firm, shut down its file-sharing service. Known as Scour Exchange, the Napster-like service--at the heart of pending legal action--allowed consumers to copy and swap digitized versions of songs, movies, photographs and other multimedia files. "With heavy hearts, we have come to this decision after months of litigation with the music and movie industries, a bankruptcy and a series of layoffs of our staff," the company said.
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BUSINESS
December 13, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The assets of Scour Inc., the defunct entertainment "dot-com" operation once backed by former super-agent Michael Ovitz, were auctioned off Tuesday in Bankruptcy Court to a key rival, marking the effective end of the controversial Beverly Hills firm. CenterSpan Communications Corp., a software developer based in Hillsboro, Ore., won out against rival bidders Liquid Audio Inc. and Listen.com. CenterSpan's winning bid was $9 million, consisting of $5.5 million cash and the rest in stock.
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BUSINESS
November 18, 2000 | P.J. Huffstutter
Online search engine MP3Board.com Inc. has joined the crowd of technology companies trying to grab the assets of the now-defunct firm Scour Inc. While MP3Board did not say how much it plans to bid, it did disclose in a court filing that it only wants Scour's file-sharing technology, known as Scour Exchange. The Napster-like technology--at the heart of pending legal action--allowed consumers to copy and swap digitized versions of songs, movies, photographs and other multimedia files.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Liquid Audio Inc., whose products enable companies to distribute music over the Internet, said it is bidding for the assets of Scour Inc. to gain software that allows users to exchange music files online. Liquid Audio joins Internet search service Listen.com and software maker CenterSpan Communications Corp. in bidding for the assets of Scour, which sought bankruptcy protection in October after the entertainment industry sued it for allowing users to circulate copyright material illegally.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2000 | P.J. Huffstutter
A federal bankruptcy judge denied MP3Board.com Inc.'s request for an emergency hearing, and told the online search engine that it would have to wait until Dec. 12 to bid on the assets of the now-defunct firm Scour Inc. While MP3Board did not say how much it plans to bid, it disclosed in a court filing that it wants only Scour's file-sharing technology, known as Scour Exchange.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Liquid Audio Inc., whose products enable companies to distribute music over the Internet, said it is bidding for the assets of Scour Inc. to gain software that allows users to exchange music files online. Liquid Audio joins Internet search service Listen.com and software maker CenterSpan Communications Corp. in bidding for the assets of Scour, which sought bankruptcy protection in October after the entertainment industry sued it for allowing users to circulate copyright material illegally.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Internet software company will announce today it intends to join the bidding for the assets of the bankrupt file-swapping company Scour Inc. CenterSpan Communications Corp. plans to use Scour's technology to enhance its communication and file-sharing software. Chief Executive Frank Hausmann will announce his intention to join the bidding for Scour's assets at a hearing in federal Bankruptcy Court in Los Angeles. In July, the Motion Picture Assn. of America and the Recording Industry Assn.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scour Inc. announced late Friday that it has stopped a controversial Internet search engine tool that enabled outsiders to peek at digital entertainment files in personal computers, sometimes without the owner's knowledge. The move came on the same day a story in The Times detailed the practice.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scour Inc., the controversial Beverly Hills multimedia company backed by former Hollywood super-agent Michael Ovitz, became the latest victim of the "dot-com" crash Thursday when it filed for protection from its creditors in federal bankruptcy court. The company, which is facing at least two lawsuits and recently laid off all but 12 of its 70 employees, is seeking to restructure its finances under Chapter 11 of the federal Bankruptcy Code.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scour Inc., the controversial Beverly Hills multimedia company backed by former super-agent Michael Ovitz, edged closer to becoming the latest victim of the "dot-com" crash, announcing Friday it was laying off 52 of its 70 employees. The company had been searching for additional financing over the last few months, but officials said a lawsuit filed against the company in July by the Motion Picture Assn. of America and the Recording Industry Assn.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2000 | P.J. Huffstutter
A federal bankruptcy judge denied MP3Board.com Inc.'s request for an emergency hearing, and told the online search engine that it would have to wait until Dec. 12 to bid on the assets of the now-defunct firm Scour Inc. While MP3Board did not say how much it plans to bid, it disclosed in a court filing that it wants only Scour's file-sharing technology, known as Scour Exchange.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2000 | P.J. Huffstutter
Online search engine MP3Board.com Inc. has joined the crowd of technology companies trying to grab the assets of the now-defunct firm Scour Inc. While MP3Board did not say how much it plans to bid, it did disclose in a court filing that it only wants Scour's file-sharing technology, known as Scour Exchange. The Napster-like technology--at the heart of pending legal action--allowed consumers to copy and swap digitized versions of songs, movies, photographs and other multimedia files.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2000 | P.J. Huffstutter
Scour Inc., the music-swapping Beverly Hills firm, shut down its file-sharing service. Known as Scour Exchange, the Napster-like service--at the heart of pending legal action--allowed consumers to copy and swap digitized versions of songs, movies, photographs and other multimedia files. "With heavy hearts, we have come to this decision after months of litigation with the music and movie industries, a bankruptcy and a series of layoffs of our staff," the company said.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Internet software company will announce today it intends to join the bidding for the assets of the bankrupt file-swapping company Scour Inc. CenterSpan Communications Corp. plans to use Scour's technology to enhance its communication and file-sharing software. Chief Executive Frank Hausmann will announce his intention to join the bidding for Scour's assets at a hearing in federal Bankruptcy Court in Los Angeles. In July, the Motion Picture Assn. of America and the Recording Industry Assn.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scour Inc., the controversial Beverly Hills multimedia company backed by former Hollywood super-agent Michael Ovitz, became the latest victim of the "dot-com" crash Thursday when it filed for protection from its creditors in federal bankruptcy court. The company, which is facing at least two lawsuits and recently laid off all but 12 of its 70 employees, is seeking to restructure its finances under Chapter 11 of the federal Bankruptcy Code.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scour Inc., the controversial Beverly Hills multimedia company backed by former super-agent Michael Ovitz, edged closer to becoming the latest victim of the "dot-com" crash, announcing Friday it was laying off 52 of its 70 employees. The company had been searching for additional financing over the last few months, but officials said a lawsuit filed against the company in July by the Motion Picture Assn. of America and the Recording Industry Assn.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The assets of Scour Inc., the defunct entertainment "dot-com" operation once backed by former super-agent Michael Ovitz, were auctioned off Tuesday in Bankruptcy Court to a key rival, marking the effective end of the controversial Beverly Hills firm. CenterSpan Communications Corp., a software developer based in Hillsboro, Ore., won out against rival bidders Liquid Audio Inc. and Listen.com. CenterSpan's winning bid was $9 million, consisting of $5.5 million cash and the rest in stock.
NEWS
July 14, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A popular Internet service that locates digital music and video files also has allowed users to peer at any kind of multimedia file stored on many personal computers--sometimes without the owners' knowledge. Scour Inc., a Beverly Hills-based new-media company backed by Hollywood super-agent Michael Ovitz, has attracted millions of users eager to tap into what the company boasts is one of the Internet's biggest collections of digital entertainment.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Continuing the war against online services that allow computer users to trade movies and songs for free, Hollywood's largest film studios have teamed up with major record companies and music publishers to file suit against Scour Inc., a Beverly Hills new-media venture backed by former super-agent Michael Ovitz. The copyright infringement suit against Scour, filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in New York, pairs the Motion Picture Assn. of America with the Recording Industry Assn. of America.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scour Inc. announced late Friday that it has stopped a controversial Internet search engine tool that enabled outsiders to peek at digital entertainment files in personal computers, sometimes without the owner's knowledge. The move came on the same day a story in The Times detailed the practice.
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