Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScouting Sports
IN THE NEWS

Scouting Sports

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
April 8, 1992 | TOM HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seattle Mariners' scout Myron Pines has a different perspective when it comes to evaluating potential major league players. While most scouts are content to sit in the stands and watch, Pines gets a closer look--from the dugout. Pines is in his seventh season as baseball coach at Santiago High School, where he helped turn around a struggling program. Last year, he led the Cavaliers to their first outright league championship since 1969.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 24, 2010 | HELENE ELLIOTT
The scouts who are shaping the Kings' future have driven through snowstorms on twisty mountain roads in British Columbia to see games and have crept across the Canadian prairie guided by hope and a GPS device telling them the next turn is 120 miles away. They've looked at gangly, teenaged defensemen for glimpses of what they might become, sought signs a scrawny winger will develop broad shoulders and tough skin. They've projected who's destined to be a difference-maker, a sixth defenseman at best, a career minor-leaguer.
Advertisement
SPORTS
April 29, 1990 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deborah Lopez, mother of one of Southern California's best grade-school basketball players, was more than a little occupied with her 23-month-old twin sons. They squirmed and tugged as she walked into the gym at Campbell Hall School in North Hollywood two months ago. But the twins were not the only ones competing for her attention. Lopez was being followed by a man she had just met. He wore a blue jacket embossed with the logo of a high school all-star game. He was carrying a notebook and pen.
SPORTS
March 13, 1989 | CHRIS FOSTER, Times Staff Writer
Quinton Knight has wanted to be a professional football player since his Pop Warner days. The dream became even stronger when he entered Clearwater High School in Clearwater, Fla. Knight was part of a Clearwater team that included Hassan Jones, now with the Minnesota Vikings, and Ron Moten, a sixth-round draft pick of the Philadelphia Eagles in 1987. They had grown up together, hung out together and helped each other.
SPORTS
May 23, 1991 | BOB OATES
The following undrafted football players of recent years--none of whom could meet the scouts' rigid standards for speed, size, strength and/or other measurables at the end of their college careers--became NFL starters shortly before the league adopted its present 80-man summer roster limit, which would have ruled many of them out: OFFENSE Position Player College NFL Team Wide Receiver Stephone Paige Fresno State Kansas City Chiefs Wide Receiver Gary Clark James Madison Washington Redskins
SPORTS
July 29, 1993 | MARTIN HENDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Greg Ritter walked past a receiving line made up of students from Carl Harvey School after his first game in the ASICS Southern California Summer Pro League. His debut with the Lakers was mixed. In five minutes, he had no rebounds, but he blocked two shots and made both free throws. Ritter didn't play basketball in high school and didn't go to college. He was 6 feet 3 inches when he graduated from Danville (Ill.) High. But Ritter, 24, grew 13 inches in the 13 months after high school.
SPORTS
March 26, 1992 | BOB WOLF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During Ray Boone's 13-year career in the major leagues, his peak salary was $32,500. If he were in his prime today, he would be earning about a hundred times that much. Under the circumstances, Boone, 68, who attended Hoover High in San Diego and lives in Alpine, Calif., might be tempted to say he was born too soon. His son, Bob, made a more handsome living in 19 major league seasons, and his grandson, Bret, is on the brink of a career that could make him a multimillionaire.
SPORTS
April 8, 1992 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just another Sunset League baseball game. Not even an important one. Then Jon Ward, Huntington Beach pitcher and this day's phenom, stepped out of the dugout. A group of men, who until then had been huddled behind the backstop jawing and spitting, were suddenly interested. Ward took no more than two steps when this odd-looking collection of onlookers reached for their hardware. Out came speed guns of all shapes and sizes.
SPORTS
May 19, 1990 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are times when it looks as though a military platoon has been assigned to Jackie Robinson Stadium. Actually, they are units of major league baseball scouts, all with speed guns drawn and pointed through the backstop at UCLA pitcher Dave Zancanaro. Zancanaro's weapon? A 90-m.p.h. fastball and a change-up that tails away. Sometimes, it has been more like a stampede.
SPORTS
February 23, 2008 | SAM FARMER
Times staff writer Sam Farmer's report Friday from Indianapolis, where many of the nation's top professional football prospects are participating in the NFL scouting combine: Fast company The workout portion of the combine begins today, meaning some position groups will run 40-yard dashes. Despite being of debatable value in many cases -- how often is an offensive tackle going to run 40 yards? -- it remains the most-discussed testing drill.
SPORTS
June 15, 2007 | From Associated Press
The Arizona Diamondbacks arrived at Yankee Stadium this week tied for the National League West lead and 10 games over .500. The Yankees swept them, extending their winning streak to nine. Here's what the Diamondbacks' scouting report said about how their pitchers should approach the New York hitters. The report was found on the floor of the Arizona dugout by an Associated Press reporter after the Yankees' 7-1 win Thursday: Alex Rodriguez "HOT right now....
SPORTS
February 23, 2007 | Sam Farmer, Times Staff Writer
Most NFL hopefuls invited to the scouting combine are angling for a breakout performance but a few won't even break a sweat. The league jealously protects the list of players who have decided not to work out for teams and instead plan to showcase their skills at their personal on-campus pro days. But there were rumblings Thursday that two of the top quarterbacks and receivers would sit out at least part of their workouts, scheduled for Sunday.
SPORTS
February 11, 2007 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
Jorge Facundo D'Elia has a bright cousin. Lots of smarts, lots of ambition. So much so, in fact, that she now finds herself at Yale, studying graphic design. It was in New Haven, Conn., one night a few weeks ago that D'Elia's cousin was surfing the Internet and came across the Galaxy's website. It mentioned an open tryout scheduled for early February. She thought of Jorge, back home in Guatemala, yearning to be a professional soccer player. She e-mailed him. He agreed. She signed him up.
SPORTS
August 16, 2006 | Bill Plaschke
Around the hotel table sat Dodgers executives discussing trades. In the corner sat the old scout watching television. Around the hotel table they were talking about dumping Milton Bradley and wondering whom they should demand from the Oakland A's in return. In the corner sat the old scout who has never worked with radar gun, computer or even stopwatch. Around the hotel room table, someone mentioned an unknown double-A outfielder named Andre Ethier. In the corner, the old scout jumped.
SPORTS
April 2, 2006 | Tim Brown, Times Staff Writer
Three years since its first steroid test, a year since its first suspension, three days since Commissioner Bud Selig sent former Sen. George Mitchell and his posse of lawyers after the stragglers, baseball doesn't look as much like Barry Bonds' game anymore. Where once it outgrew its uniforms, an off-season at a time, baseball -- with help from Congress and its public -- has begun to outgrow its dependence on steroids.
SPORTS
July 15, 1997 | BILL PLASCHKE
The white Panama hat is tilted back. The cigar is in the pocket. The radar gun is in the car. Mike Brito carefully removes three World Series rings, picks up a bottle of lotion, lathers his giant hands. "Watch this," he says. "He likes it when I do this." Slowly, gently, he massages legs that will never walk. He kneads arms that will never extend. He rubs fingers that will never touch.
SPORTS
April 2, 2006 | Tim Brown, Times Staff Writer
Three years since its first steroid test, a year since its first suspension, three days since Commissioner Bud Selig sent former Sen. George Mitchell and his posse of lawyers after the stragglers, baseball doesn't look as much like Barry Bonds' game anymore. Where once it outgrew its uniforms, an off-season at a time, baseball -- with help from Congress and its public -- has begun to outgrow its dependence on steroids.
SPORTS
December 5, 1999 | PAUL GUTIERREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The road to Campo Las Palmas is beset with the squalor of Third World poverty. Children hang out of the pastel-colored shacks that they call home, wearing little more than the pain and dirt on their faces while they wonder from where their next meal will come. They walk barefoot amid shards of glass and trash and splash about in the same muddy puddles where emaciated dogs drink.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|