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May 22, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
South Coast Repertory had a big weekend. The industrious playgoer could see new plays by Marlane Meyer, Beth Henley and Robert Daseler, and attend readings of new scripts by Sam Garcia Jr. and Philip Kan Gotanda, all part of SCR's California Play Festival--Calfest. With time for only one show, I chose Meyer's "The Geography of Luck." This started as a reading at the Los Angeles Theatre Center and will return there for a mainstage production in August. It's a work in transition, although you wouldn't know it from Roberta Levitow's assured SCR production, featuring Ebbe Roe Smith as an ex-con trying to connect with his life and Elizabeth Ruscio as a woman who is ready to help him, up to a point.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1989 | DON SHIRLEY and JAN HERMAN
South Coast Repertory's 1989-90 season will include at least two brand-new plays, one American premiere and one Southern California premiere, artistic director Martin Benson has announced. The first productions of Howard Korder's "Search and Destroy" and Richard Hellesen's "Once in Arden" and the first Southern California staging of Hugh Whitemore's "Breaking the Code" will be on South Coast's main stage. On the Second Stage, South Coast will produce the American premiere of Sharman MacDonald's "When I Was a Girl, I Used to Scream and Shout" and the previously reported "Frankie and Johnny in the Claire de Lune" by Terrence McNally.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
South Coast Repertory has penciled in five of the 11 plays it will stage for its 1989-90 season, artistic director Martin Benson said Tuesday. The Tony-winning company in Costa Mesa will mount Mainstage productions of Richard Hellesen's "Once in Arden" and Howard Korder's "Search and Destroy"--both world premieres--and Hugh Whitemore's "Breaking the Code," a Southern California premiere. On the Second Stage, Benson said, SCR will produce the American premiere of Sharman MacDonald's "When I Was a Girl, I Used to Scream and Shout" and the previously reported "Frankie and Johnny in the Claire de Lune" by Terrence McNally.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1989 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
South Coast Repertory has penciled in five of the 11 plays it will stage for its 1989-90 season, artistic director Martin Benson said Tuesday. The Tony-winning company in Costa Mesa will mount Mainstage productions of Richard Hellesen's "Once in Arden" and Howard Korder's "Search and Destroy"--both world premieres--and Hugh Whitemore's "Breaking the Code," a Southern California premiere. On the Second Stage, Benson said, SCR will produce the American premiere of Sharman MacDonald's "When I Was a Girl, I Used to Scream and Shout" and the previously reported "Frankie and Johnny in the Claire de Lune" by Terrence McNally.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1989 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Non-critics sometimes ask critics--between the usual "why-didn't-you-like-that?" queries--what it is they look for in a work. Seeing Robert Daseler's "Dragon Lady," his new, and very first, play at South Coast Repertory's Second Stage (and part of SCR's California Play Festival), triggered this critic's own self-inquiry. A kind of laundry list, so to speak. Story? It doesn't have much of one, but good plays often don't. Characters? It has, perhaps, two interesting people, yet some fine plays only have one. Drama?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1989 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Good children's plays are hard to come by. That's one reason you see so many Snow Whites and Cinderellas treading the boards. Last spring, though, South Coast Repertory asked its own literary manager, John Glore, to write a play for the Young Conservatory Players, 10-to-17-year-old members of SCR's youth theater training program who put on several shows a year. The result--Glore's refreshingly different "Wind of a Thousand Tales," in which a pragmatic little girl named Kimberly-Kay discovered her own imagination by taking a magical journey through three folk tales--was one of the Players' finest offerings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1989 | JAN HERMAN
In a newsletter mailed this week to about 23,000 subscribers, South Coast Repertory has announced several plays being considered by artistic directors David Emmes and Martin Benson for the Costa Mesa theater's 11-play, 1989-90 season. Among the contemporary plays they are mulling for the six Mainstage productions are Alan Ayckbourn's "Woman in Mind," Hugh Whitemore's "Breaking the Code," Richard Hellesen's "Once in Arden" and Howard Korder's "Search and Destroy." Korder's and Hellesen's plays, if chosen, would be world premieres.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1989 | KAREN NEWELL YOUNG
Some may remember Kimberly Kay from last year's South Coast Repertory Youth Conservatory Players' production of John Glore's "Wind of a Thousand Tales," in which she found her imagination with the help of a breeze who told stories. She's back. "Folk Tales, Too," also by Glore, opened at SCR over the weekend as part of its California Play Festival. This time around, we find Kimberly up in the attic of her home after an argument with her dad. Before long, she's dreaming up little tales which--stitched together into an hourlong comic-drama--provide a tapestry of ideas that helps her understand her father's anger, and her love for him. This is an intricate adventure of the sort rarely seen in children's theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1989 | DON SHIRLEY and JAN HERMAN
South Coast Repertory's 1989-90 season will include at least two brand-new plays, one American premiere and one Southern California premiere, artistic director Martin Benson has announced. The first productions of Howard Korder's "Search and Destroy" and Richard Hellesen's "Once in Arden" and the first Southern California staging of Hugh Whitemore's "Breaking the Code" will be on South Coast's main stage. On the Second Stage, South Coast will produce the American premiere of Sharman MacDonald's "When I Was a Girl, I Used to Scream and Shout" and the previously reported "Frankie and Johnny in the Claire de Lune" by Terrence McNally.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
South Coast Repertory had a big weekend. The industrious playgoer could see new plays by Marlane Meyer, Beth Henley and Robert Daseler, and attend readings of new scripts by Sam Garcia Jr. and Philip Kan Gotanda, all part of SCR's California Play Festival--Calfest. With time for only one show, I chose Meyer's "The Geography of Luck." This started as a reading at the Los Angeles Theatre Center and will return there for a mainstage production in August. It's a work in transition, although you wouldn't know it from Roberta Levitow's assured SCR production, featuring Ebbe Roe Smith as an ex-con trying to connect with his life and Elizabeth Ruscio as a woman who is ready to help him, up to a point.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1989 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Non-critics sometimes ask critics--between the usual "why-didn't-you-like-that?" queries--what it is they look for in a work. Seeing Robert Daseler's "Dragon Lady," his new, and very first, play at South Coast Repertory's Second Stage (and part of SCR's California Play Festival), triggered this critic's own self-inquiry. A kind of laundry list, so to speak. Story? It doesn't have much of one, but good plays often don't. Characters? It has, perhaps, two interesting people, yet some fine plays only have one. Drama?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1989 | KAREN NEWELL YOUNG
Some may remember Kimberly Kay from last year's South Coast Repertory Youth Conservatory Players' production of John Glore's "Wind of a Thousand Tales," in which she found her imagination with the help of a breeze who told stories. She's back. "Folk Tales, Too," also by Glore, opened at SCR over the weekend as part of its California Play Festival. This time around, we find Kimberly up in the attic of her home after an argument with her dad. Before long, she's dreaming up little tales which--stitched together into an hourlong comic-drama--provide a tapestry of ideas that helps her understand her father's anger, and her love for him. This is an intricate adventure of the sort rarely seen in children's theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1989 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Good children's plays are hard to come by. That's one reason you see so many Snow Whites and Cinderellas treading the boards. Last spring, though, South Coast Repertory asked its own literary manager, John Glore, to write a play for the Young Conservatory Players, 10-to-17-year-old members of SCR's youth theater training program who put on several shows a year. The result--Glore's refreshingly different "Wind of a Thousand Tales," in which a pragmatic little girl named Kimberly-Kay discovered her own imagination by taking a magical journey through three folk tales--was one of the Players' finest offerings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1989 | JAN HERMAN
In a newsletter mailed this week to about 23,000 subscribers, South Coast Repertory has announced several plays being considered by artistic directors David Emmes and Martin Benson for the Costa Mesa theater's 11-play, 1989-90 season. Among the contemporary plays they are mulling for the six Mainstage productions are Alan Ayckbourn's "Woman in Mind," Hugh Whitemore's "Breaking the Code," Richard Hellesen's "Once in Arden" and Howard Korder's "Search and Destroy." Korder's and Hellesen's plays, if chosen, would be world premieres.
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