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Scrabble Game

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NEWS
May 11, 1997 | EMILY OTANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The plates on Mark Landsberg's black Mercedes read "MR. 770." And his name appears in the Guinness Book of World Records next to 770--the most points ever scored in a single Scrabble tournament game. Yet the man who will go down in history for his ability to scramble tiles into winning combinations shuns competitions held around the country, even if they offer him a chance to break his record. The man they call Mr.
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NEWS
July 22, 2001 | BERNADETTE MURPHY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The board game we know as Scrabble was invented by Alfred Butts, an unemployed architect, in 1933 when the difficulties of the Depression began to seem unending. Butts thought that people needed a distraction during hard times. He'd researched other games and wanted to create one that mixed strategy, skill and luck. Growing up, Butts had played the word game Anagrams, in which players drew letters one by one from a jumble and attempted to make words.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1996 | JOHN POPE
From first-time competitors to some of the biggest names in the game, 90 Scrabble players from six states were in Orange County over the weekend for a two-day tournament. "Many players started at home with their parents, or in college, but it's the competition that really gets them into the game," said Gina Du Mez, organizer of the event Saturday and Sunday at the Atrium Marquis Hotel in Irvine. "People travel all over the country to get to tournaments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1999 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
This is Scrabble as it might have been played at the O.K. Corral. On a recent Thursday, 28 members of the Montrose Scrabble Club lean in pairs over their boards, intent on whomping their opponents using only the letters of the alphabet. The Montrose group has some players who are here mostly to have fun and a somewhat larger number who regard Scrabble as a blood sport. The serious players--the ones who enter the tournaments held under the auspices of the National Scrabble Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997 | EMILY OTANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They call him Mr. 770. The plates on Mark Landsberg's black Mercedes read MR. 770. And his name appears in the "Guinness Book of World Records" next to 770--the most points ever scored in a single Scrabble tournament game. Yet the man who will go down in history for his ability to scramble tiles into winning combinations often shuns competitions held around the country, even if they offer him a chance to break his own record.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1996 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Martin Baker used to travel from his Fullerton home to Los Angeles, Long Beach and San Fernando Valley to play Scrabble, but the long drives finally got to him. So he started his own group. He established Club 464 this spring, and the members now spend Friday nights enthusiastically flipping the lettered tiles and crowing over the points they score with each rarely used word. "The game has been around since the 1930s," said Baker, 32, a sign painter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1994 | ALICIA DOYLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Call it Wordstock. Three hundred avid Scrabble players--lawyers, dancers, psychologists, cab drivers--from as far away as Thailand arrived to play in the 1994 National Scrabble Championship, the 10th biennial event that kicked off Sunday at the Universal Hilton Hotel. And if they share one thing, it's that they take their words seriously. They memorize the dictionary in their spare time, practice against computers and study flash cards for hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1999 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
This is Scrabble as it might have been played at the O.K. Corral. On a recent Thursday, 28 members of the Montrose Scrabble Club lean in pairs over their boards, intent on whomping their opponents using only the letters of the alphabet. The Montrose group has some players who are here mostly to have fun and a somewhat larger number who regard Scrabble as a blood sport. The serious players--the ones who enter the tournaments held under the auspices of the National Scrabble Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1996 | Patricia Ward Biederman
There are two kinds of Scrabble players--people who play a friendly game and real players who want to tear their opponents' hearts out, even as they earn 50 extra points for putting down all seven of their letters. As to my own approach to the game, let me confess that at some point during his adolescence my son stopped playing Scrabble with me and his father because the lad hates blood sports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hers was a world in which a person's connections spell success or failure. Which explains why nearly 100 of the Los Angeles area's most fervent word lovers were intently hunched over game boards and connecting letters Sunday at the annual Ethel Sherard Celebrity Scrabble Tournament in Pasadena. Sherard was an Eagle Rock resident known as the "Scrabble Lady" when she died six years ago at 95. For thousands of players, she was the person who wrote the book on the game.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | EMILY OTANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The plates on Mark Landsberg's black Mercedes read "MR. 770." And his name appears in the Guinness Book of World Records next to 770--the most points ever scored in a single Scrabble tournament game. Yet the man who will go down in history for his ability to scramble tiles into winning combinations shuns competitions held around the country, even if they offer him a chance to break his record. The man they call Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997 | EMILY OTANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They call him Mr. 770. The plates on Mark Landsberg's black Mercedes read MR. 770. And his name appears in the "Guinness Book of World Records" next to 770--the most points ever scored in a single Scrabble tournament game. Yet the man who will go down in history for his ability to scramble tiles into winning combinations often shuns competitions held around the country, even if they offer him a chance to break his own record.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1996 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Martin Baker used to travel from his Fullerton home to Los Angeles, Long Beach and San Fernando Valley to play Scrabble, but the long drives finally got to him. So he started his own group. He established Club 464 this spring, and the members now spend Friday nights enthusiastically flipping the lettered tiles and crowing over the points they score with each rarely used word. "The game has been around since the 1930s," said Baker, 32, a sign painter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1996 | JOHN POPE
From first-time competitors to some of the biggest names in the game, 90 Scrabble players from six states were in Orange County over the weekend for a two-day tournament. "Many players started at home with their parents, or in college, but it's the competition that really gets them into the game," said Gina Du Mez, organizer of the event Saturday and Sunday at the Atrium Marquis Hotel in Irvine. "People travel all over the country to get to tournaments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1996 | Patricia Ward Biederman
There are two kinds of Scrabble players--people who play a friendly game and real players who want to tear their opponents' hearts out, even as they earn 50 extra points for putting down all seven of their letters. As to my own approach to the game, let me confess that at some point during his adolescence my son stopped playing Scrabble with me and his father because the lad hates blood sports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1994 | ALICIA DOYLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Call it wordstock . Three hundred avid Scrabble players--lawyers, dancers, psychologists, cabdrivers--from as far away as Thailand arrived here to play in the 1994 National Scrabble championship, the 10th biennial event that kicked off Sunday at the Universal Hilton Hotel. And if they share one thing, it's that they take their words to heart. They memorize word lists in their spare time, practice against computerized Scrabble programs and study flash cards for hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hers was a world in which a person's connections spell success or failure. Which explains why nearly 100 of the Los Angeles area's most fervent word lovers were intently hunched over game boards and connecting letters Sunday at the annual Ethel Sherard Celebrity Scrabble Tournament in Pasadena. Sherard was an Eagle Rock resident known as the "Scrabble Lady" when she died six years ago at 95. For thousands of players, she was the person who wrote the book on the game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1994 | ALICIA DOYLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Call it Wordstock. Three hundred avid Scrabble players--lawyers, dancers, psychologists, cab drivers--from as far away as Thailand arrived to play in the 1994 National Scrabble Championship, the 10th biennial event that kicked off Sunday at the Universal Hilton Hotel. And if they share one thing, it's that they take their words seriously. They memorize the dictionary in their spare time, practice against computers and study flash cards for hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1994 | ALICIA DOYLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Call it wordstock . Three hundred avid Scrabble players--lawyers, dancers, psychologists, cabdrivers--from as far away as Thailand arrived here to play in the 1994 National Scrabble championship, the 10th biennial event that kicked off Sunday at the Universal Hilton Hotel. And if they share one thing, it's that they take their words to heart. They memorize word lists in their spare time, practice against computerized Scrabble programs and study flash cards for hours.
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