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ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
A stolen sculpture by British artist Henry Moore valued at $770,000 could end up being sold for scrap, officials have speculated. The 22-inch bronze sundial from 1965 was taken this week from the Henry Moore Foundation, the sculpture's former home-turned-museum in Hertfordshire near London. This is the second time a Moore sculpture has been lifted from the 72-acre property: In 2005 thieves used a crane to steal the 12-foot bronze statue "Reclining Figure," worth an estimated $4.5 million.
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BUSINESS
March 9, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - California lawmakers for years have been battling ravenous metal thieves, who pull copper wires out of street lights, grab rebar from construction sites, and steal pumps and other costly equipment from farmers' fields. Now, a bipartisan group of legislators led by Assemblyman Brian Nestande (R-Palm Desert), is trying to put more manpower and money into the fight. Nestande's bill, AB 2313, would create a metal theft task force within the attorney general's office that would provide grants to local police and prosecutors.
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BUSINESS
November 11, 1986
WCS International, an Anaheim scrap metal exporter, said it has filed a registration statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission for the sale of 3 million shares and 1.5 million warrants in an effort to raise from $12 million to $15 million. The company, whose name is being changed to Adams International Metals Corp., wants to sell the shares and warrants in an offering of 1.5 million units.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | Steve Lopez
Morrie Markoff is not now and has never been a man of half measures. When he saw Depression-era evictions in his New York tenement, he became a fiery political activist. When he trained as a machinist, he was top of his class. When he argued with his wife, he left nothing in the tank. There's much to be learned from people like Markoff, who died briefly in 2012, but, true to his nature, clawed his way back to life. "His heart stopped, his eyes shut, his mouth fell open and his tongue dropped out," Morrie's daughter Judy said to me in an email, adding that the grieving family retreated to Good Samaritan Hospital's meditation room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1998 | JOSH MEYER and JOSEPH TREVINO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A downtown scrap metal company containing volatile titanium and magnesium erupted in flames Tuesday, creating huge billows of smoke, forcing employees of nearby businesses to flee and causing a massive traffic jam on a nearby freeway during rush hour. The fire broke out about 4:30 p.m. in a scrap yard at Monico Alloys Inc. when sparks from a welding torch landed on titanium shavings, said Los Angeles City Fire Capt. Steve Ruda.
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | SUSAN WOODWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Wilmington boat owner Claire Randall used to clean her 39-foot trimaran with a magnet. She would pick up tiny metal filings from her deck every time the scrap metal company a few hundred feet across the water loaded a ship. And she recently bought earplugs to help block the noise made by Hugo Neu-Proler's operations at all times of the day and night. For two years, Randall and the L.A. Harbor Boatowners Assn.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An employee of a Wilmington scrap metal shop has been booked on murder charges in the shooting death of a man who had loaded his pickup truck with stolen scrap metal, police said Saturday. Richard Zacher, 43, whose family owns the scrap shop, was held without bail at the Los Angeles Police Department's Parker Center Jail after the shooting, which occurred about 1 p.m. Friday, said Police Sgt. Dan Pugel of the department's Harbor Division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1998 | JOSH MEYER and JOSEPH TREVINO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A downtown scrap metal company containing volatile titanium and magnesium erupted in flames Tuesday, creating huge billows of smoke, forcing employees of nearby businesses to flee and causing a massive traffic jam on a nearby freeway during rush hour. The fire broke out about 4:30 p.m. in a scrap yard at Monico Alloys Inc. when sparks from a welding torch landed on titanium shavings, said Los Angeles City Fire Capt. Steve Ruda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca has a special interest in supporting two state bills aiming to stop the widespread and rampant theft of valuable metals, including copper wiring and pipes. Sometime around 4 a.m. July 26, thieves climbed the walls of four office buildings in Santa Fe Springs and stripped large air-conditioning units of their copper wires, insulation and fans. One of the buildings hit: the sheriff's Commercial Crimes Bureau.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2008 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
For the second time in four months, suspected scrap metal thieves have stolen a bronze statue in Covina, part of a collection of public art funded by a local developer. The theft occurred in front of a bank building late Friday or early Saturday. The thieves apparently used a truck to drag the 300-pound statue until it broke loose from its base, said Sgt. Ray Marquez of the Covina Police Department.
WORLD
December 27, 2013 | By David Zucchino
BAGRAM, Afghanistan - Faced with an epidemic of deadly roadside bombs in Iraq and Afghanistan, U.S. military officials ordered up a fleet of V-hulled 16-ton armored behemoths in 2007 to help protect American soldiers and Marines. At a cost of $1 million each, the ugly tan beasts known as MRAPS have saved countless lives and absorbed or deflected thousands of insurgent bomb blasts in teeming cities, desert flats and rutted mountain roadways. The lumbering vehicles are so beloved that soldiers have scrawled notes of thanks on their armor.
WORLD
December 5, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Authorities sought at least two thieves on Thursday who had seized a truck with radioactive material in central Mexico, while a family who found and took home the exposed stolen container was under medical observation, officials said. The truck was hijacked Monday by gunmen who intercepted it north of Mexico City. It was transporting a large amount of highly active cobalt-60, a radioactive substance used in the treatment of cancer, from a hospital in Tijuana to a nuclear waste storage dump near the capital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2012 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
State officials said Thursday that they will start a task force to target problems posed by scrap metal recycling operations across California, which have been loosely regulated and linked to environmental contamination and numerous fires and explosions in recent years. The move by the state Department of Toxic Substances Control marks the first large-scale attempt to coordinate oversight of such operations, which handle hazardous metals and can generate toxic dust that pollutes the air and the ocean.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
A stolen sculpture by British artist Henry Moore valued at $770,000 could end up being sold for scrap, officials have speculated. The 22-inch bronze sundial from 1965 was taken this week from the Henry Moore Foundation, the sculpture's former home-turned-museum in Hertfordshire near London. This is the second time a Moore sculpture has been lifted from the 72-acre property: In 2005 thieves used a crane to steal the 12-foot bronze statue "Reclining Figure," worth an estimated $4.5 million.
NATIONAL
July 10, 2012 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- When dozens of little American flags began disappearing from Civil War veterans' graves at a cemetery in Hudson, N.Y., this month, locals fumed. Who could be so callous, especially in the days surrounding Independence Day? Thanks to surveillance cameras, a stepped-up police presence and forensic sleuthing, officials have the answer: woodchucks, also known as groundhogs. The animals apparently were burrowing beneath the ground, then taking the flags into their subterranean homes, where investigators poking cameras into the dirt have spotted some of the missing banners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2012 | Jessica Garrison
Los Angeles city prosecutors Wednesday took the unusual step of filing criminal charges against the owners of three metal recycling businesses, accusing them of illegally handling hazardous waste and allowing toxic chemicals to be released into storm water. "These facilities pose a significant threat to human health and the environment," said Patty Bilgin, who heads the Los Angeles city attorney's environmental justice unit. "These are toxic chemicals. We don't know where they are going.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From boat level in the Los Angeles Harbor, the mountains of shredded metal at the Hugo Neu-Proler Co. rise high enough to obscure the sunrise for several minutes each morning. It is less the unsightly heaps of former cars, washing machines and iron pipes that concern neighbors and environmentalists, however, than what goes unseen--industrial toxins that have seeped into the soil and washed into the bay during the company's 33 years in the scrap metal business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1990 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tires--hundreds of tires--appliances by the dozen and a new car with only its stereo missing were among a "shocking" collection of illegally dumped items pulled this week from two steep ravines in La Tuna Canyon in Tujunga. By Thursday afternoon, sweating, dirty volunteer workers and minimum-wage Los Angeles Conservation Corps employees had dredged out what cleanup organizers said was one of the worst collections of dumped debris they have ever seen in a San Fernando Valley canyon.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2011
Rebecca Black's infamous "Friday" video has topped all other YouTube videos of 2011 with 180 million views. The Google Inc. video-sharing site announced its most-viewed clips of the year Tuesday. The 14-year-old Black was turned into a viral video celebrity after her parents paid a production company to make the music video for her. "Friday" became an unlikely, off-key global hit. Because of a legal dispute with Ark Music Factory, the video has had two YouTube incarnations, both of which were tabulated in the year-end count.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2011 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
They're stealing this small town's history. The bronze plaques that marked the wheres and noted the whos and whispered the back story of Selma, "raisin capital of the world," are disappearing. Gone are the testaments that an elementary school was a public works project built during the Great Depression and that the women's club has stood since 1911. There are no longer etched letters gracing the town mural in loving memory of Mr. Snodgrow, or a bronzed list of those who donated money to build the church hall at St. Joseph's.
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