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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2001 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owner of eight wrought iron gates discarded two years ago from St. Vibiana's Cathedral moved closer Monday to returning them, but on one condition: They must be used for a new tribute to the Virgin of Guadalupe. Although the cathedral has been sold to a private developer and is scheduled to become a performing arts center and hotel, welder Dan Giles said Monday that he would sell back the gates only if they are used for their original function, part of a monument to the Virgin.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2001 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost two years ago, welder Dan Giles rescued eight gold-painted gates to a shrine at St. Vibiana's Cathedral from a scrap heap. On Wednesday, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Conservancy and an attorney with a powerful Los Angeles law firm said they want the gates returned. "We are going to ask for the gates," said archdiocese spokesman Tod Tamberg.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2001 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dan Giles does not call himself a religious man. But he has, he says, respect for God, those who worship, and monuments inspired by faith. All of which leads the 60-year-old welder from Silver Lake to a quandary when he considers the stack of wrought iron gates resting in his yard: He got them as scrap and now figures they'll fetch $50,000. For decades, the eight gold-painted gates, each weighing several hundred pounds, adorned the shrine to the Virgin of Guadalupe at St.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
A fuel leak that led to the fiery crash of an Air France Concorde jet was probably caused by a strip of metal left on the runway where the supersonic jet took off, investigators said Thursday. The 16-inch metal piece probably punctured one of the jet's tires, sending heavy chunks of rubber flying into the jet fuel tanks.
NEWS
July 1, 2000 | From the Washington Post
Unbeknownst to most of his colleagues, Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott last year made a secret promise in writing to kill changes this year to the Superfund hazardous waste cleanup law, one of the major environmental issues before Congress. Lott made the deal in order to win passage of a special provision to exempt scrap metal dealers from having to comply with the Superfund law, which requires companies to clean up their polluted sites.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2000 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She doesn't look the part, but 35-year-old Zhou Fang is a pro in the junk business. "We don't call it junk," she insists as she navigates the cavernous warehouse in her delicate heels and designer suit, dodging mountains of scrap that look more like spaghetti and coils of snakes--visions of some mad artist come to life. "See inside this insulation?" she says, teasing out a thin thread of telephone wire and pointing to its gut of eyelash-like fiber. "This is copper."
BUSINESS
January 6, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal labor officials said Tuesday they will take action against a scrap metal terminal in the Port of Los Angeles for allegedly filing a frivolous lawsuit against dock workers who participated in a bitter labor dispute with the company two years ago. The move by the National Labor Relations Board coincides with a federal court ruling in December that ordered Hugo Neu-Proler Co.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1998
A fire at a scrap metal company that ignited volatile titanium and magnesium was extinguished before it caused any toxic danger in the area, fire officials said Wednesday. The blaze at Monico Alloys, located in the 2300 block of East 15th Street, flared up Tuesday after sparks from a welding torch kindled a nearby pile of metal shavings, officials said. More than 100 firefighters were able to extinguish the fire in about two hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1998 | JOSH MEYER and JOSEPH TREVINO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A downtown scrap metal company containing volatile titanium and magnesium erupted in flames Tuesday, creating huge billows of smoke, forcing employees of nearby businesses to flee and causing a massive traffic jam on a nearby freeway during rush hour. The fire broke out about 4:30 p.m. in a scrap yard at Monico Alloys Inc. when sparks from a welding torch landed on titanium shavings, said Los Angeles City Fire Capt. Steve Ruda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1998 | JOSH MEYER and JOSEPH TREVINO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A downtown scrap metal company containing volatile titanium and magnesium erupted in flames Tuesday, creating huge billows of smoke, forcing employees of nearby businesses to flee and causing a massive traffic jam on a nearby freeway during rush hour. The fire broke out about 4:30 p.m. in a scrap yard at Monico Alloys Inc. when sparks from a welding torch landed on titanium shavings, said Los Angeles City Fire Capt. Steve Ruda.
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