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Scrap Metal

NEWS
July 1, 2000 | From the Washington Post
Unbeknownst to most of his colleagues, Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott last year made a secret promise in writing to kill changes this year to the Superfund hazardous waste cleanup law, one of the major environmental issues before Congress. Lott made the deal in order to win passage of a special provision to exempt scrap metal dealers from having to comply with the Superfund law, which requires companies to clean up their polluted sites.
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BUSINESS
January 5, 2000 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She doesn't look the part, but 35-year-old Zhou Fang is a pro in the junk business. "We don't call it junk," she insists as she navigates the cavernous warehouse in her delicate heels and designer suit, dodging mountains of scrap that look more like spaghetti and coils of snakes--visions of some mad artist come to life. "See inside this insulation?" she says, teasing out a thin thread of telephone wire and pointing to its gut of eyelash-like fiber. "This is copper."
BUSINESS
January 6, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal labor officials said Tuesday they will take action against a scrap metal terminal in the Port of Los Angeles for allegedly filing a frivolous lawsuit against dock workers who participated in a bitter labor dispute with the company two years ago. The move by the National Labor Relations Board coincides with a federal court ruling in December that ordered Hugo Neu-Proler Co.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1998
A fire at a scrap metal company that ignited volatile titanium and magnesium was extinguished before it caused any toxic danger in the area, fire officials said Wednesday. The blaze at Monico Alloys, located in the 2300 block of East 15th Street, flared up Tuesday after sparks from a welding torch kindled a nearby pile of metal shavings, officials said. More than 100 firefighters were able to extinguish the fire in about two hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1998 | JOSH MEYER and JOSEPH TREVINO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A downtown scrap metal company containing volatile titanium and magnesium erupted in flames Tuesday, creating huge billows of smoke, forcing employees of nearby businesses to flee and causing a massive traffic jam on a nearby freeway during rush hour. The fire broke out about 4:30 p.m. in a scrap yard at Monico Alloys Inc. when sparks from a welding torch landed on titanium shavings, said Los Angeles City Fire Capt. Steve Ruda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1998 | JOSH MEYER and JOSEPH TREVINO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A downtown scrap metal company containing volatile titanium and magnesium erupted in flames Tuesday, creating huge billows of smoke, forcing employees of nearby businesses to flee and causing a massive traffic jam on a nearby freeway during rush hour. The fire broke out about 4:30 p.m. in a scrap yard at Monico Alloys Inc. when sparks from a welding torch landed on titanium shavings, said Los Angeles City Fire Capt. Steve Ruda.
NEWS
November 25, 1997 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A safety officer for an Army contractor was charged Monday with second-degree murder for allegedly allowing a live military shell to be taken from Ft. Irwin to a Fontana scrap yard, where it exploded and killed a worker. The 105-millimeter shell was contained in several tons of scrap metal purchased by Dick's Auto Wrecking in Fontana, which had been assured that the load contained no explosives. Authorities arrested Timothy M.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Superior Forge Inc., one of four independent aluminum hand-forging companies in the nation, said Wednesday it has agreed to be acquired by a Chicago company as part of an effort to form a nationwide metal recycling network. Owners of privately held Superior will receive 1.08 million shares of stock in the Chicago company, Metal Management Inc. and $1.8 million in cash if the deal is completed. At Wednesday's $14.88 closing price for Metal Management's Nasdaq-traded shares, the deal is worth $17.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1996 | SHERRI BURI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The heaps of steel wheels, rusty nails and dented appliances at Schnitzer Steel's scrap yard along Highway 99 in west Eugene look like a bunch of junk. But that junk is worth millions of dollars. The Eugene operation generated about $16 million in revenue in the fiscal year ended last Aug. 31. Bankrolled by its initial public offering in 1993 and a subsequent offering last month, Schnitzer has renovated its facilities, including the Eugene site, and is looking for new acquisitions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From boat level in the Los Angeles Harbor, the mountains of shredded metal at the Hugo Neu-Proler Co. rise high enough to obscure the sunrise for several minutes each morning. It is less the unsightly heaps of former cars, washing machines and iron pipes that concern neighbors and environmentalists, however, than what goes unseen--industrial toxins that have seeped into the soil and washed into the bay during the company's 33 years in the scrap metal business.
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