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NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Judi Dash, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If you're a traveling touch-screen user, you may want to pack this stylish stylus. The Griffin Stylus/Pen/Laser Pointer ($49.99) is a rubber-tipped touch-screen stylus with a pen at the other end, and - here's the breakthrough - a cap that snaps over either end. As a bonus, a battery-powered push-button laser pointer is built into the cap, which also has a pocket clip. The ballpoint pen is refillable. Just what you need to interact with smaller screen elements while having ready access to writing and presentation tools.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times travel editor
How much is it worth to you to get through airport security faster? Most people would pay about $50, according to a Harris Poll released Thursday. Unfortunately for those folks, the Transportation Security Administration's PreCheck program, which allows expedited screening for prequalified passengers, charges $85 for five years of "fast pass" screening. The misapprehension may stem from this finding: 41% of respondents said they had never heard of PreCheck. Those are among the notions about the TSA and its procedures and programs that the survey of 2,234 adults revealed.
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OPINION
June 8, 2013
Re "A big-screen growth spurt," Business, June 4 So movie theater owners want to distinguish themselves and attract repeat customers by showing films on enormous screens? How about featuring movies that intelligent adults actually want to see? Otherwise, it's just putting mediocre food on a bigger plate. Kate Nelson Manhattan Beach ALSO: Letters: DNA collection done right Letters: Suicide and the lessons of loss Letters on letters: Marriage and families
BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Americans are split on whether airport screening lines make air travel safer. But at the same time, a majority of American adults worry that faster screening lines for travelers who submit background information might jeopardize airline safety. The latest measure of the public's attitute on airport security came from a poll of 2,234 adults in the U.S. by the Harris Poll. It comes only days after a teenage boy slipped undetected onto a Maui-bound jet at Mineta San Jose International Airport.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
With the advent of tablets and growing ubiquity of smartphones, a new Olympic sport has emerged: screen juggling. And men probably will take the gold in that competition, as they are more likely than woman to follow the Olympic Games on three or more devices, according to a new poll. It seems that 40% of those who plan to follow the Summer Olympics starting next week will do it on two or more devices, according to a recent Harris Interactive poll. Instead of channel surfing, 14% of U.S. adults surveyed said they planned to follow the Games by screen shifting among three or more devices -- that's more devices than hands to hold them.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2011
Celebrate Valentine's weekend with a four-night tribute to the silver screen's most romantic films at "Romancing the Screen. " With the tear-jerker "The Notebook," the May/December love of "Harold and Maude" and the grand, old-fashioned romances of "Casablanca" and "Gone With the Wind" ? even the dark and twisted obsession of "Double Indemnity" ? there's something to make almost every heart beat a little faster. The Aero Theatre, 14th Street and Montana Ave., Santa Monica, and the Egyptian Theatre, 6712 Hollywood Blvd.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
We all know who's going to win in an iPad versus iPad 2 drop test -- gravity, of course. But which generation holds up better in a face-to-sidewalk meeting? With a stack of iPads old and new, the good folks at SquareTrade happily took on this question. They dropped the new iPad and its older sister, iPad 2, from several different heights with the screens facing up and facing down. In the drop from waist level face up, the iPad 2, you see from the real-time and slow-motion replay, survives intact, despite a good thud.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Melissa Magsaysay
Ponytails are no longer just a post-workout hairstyle. Plenty of actresses turned up on Saturday's SAG red carpet sporting sleek and tousled versions of the ultimate off-duty hair look. Julie Bowen and Jason Bateman's wife, Amanda Anka, both wore messy and textured ponytails. Holly Hunter and Amanda Peet had more sleek styles. Surprisingly, none of the sporty do's looked all that casual. Each woman looked polished and effortless, and the ponytail proved a fresh and modern alternative to a formal up do. ALSO: SAG Awards 2014: Helen Mirren's dramatic red lip SAG Awards 2014: Early arrivals work fairytale and modern looks Screen Actors Guild Awards 2014: Hannah Simone's cheap, chic makeup  
BUSINESS
November 14, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Samsung, looking for a competitive edge in the smartphone market, is reportedly set to roll out devices with bendable display screens. The South Korean tech giant is working on display screens made with plastic that could make phones "unbreakable," a report by the Wall Street Journal says. Samsung isn't the only company to do work on flexible displays, but according to the report, the company has entered the final stage of development and hopes to be the first player to begin mass production of the technology.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Melissa Magsaysay
Besides the easy waves and sleek ponytails, short hair ruled on the SAG awards red carpet. Perhaps the most striking hairstyles were the pixie cuts, a la Jennifer Lawrence, who seems to have started a trend leading women to take the chop challenge. And a chic, angular bob, as seen on Jane Krakowski, proved to be a modern approach to red carpet hair without any trace of a curling iron or backcombing. Emma Thompson's blond crop was also very cool. She clearly goes for  effortless.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It sounds contrived, and it is. It sounds like a bit of a stunt, and it is that too. It may even sound boring, but that it is not. In fact, whip-smart filmmaking by writer-director Steven Knight and his team combined with Tom Hardy's mesmerizing acting make the micro-budgeted British independent "Locke" more minute-to-minute involving than this year's more costly extravaganzas. Though a dozen actors are listed in "Locke's" credits, Hardy is the only one who appears on screen in this real-time drama that unfolds inside a moving BMW during the 85 minutes it takes construction foreman Ivan Locke to make a nighttime drive from Birmingham to London.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Barbie is going from the toy store shelf to the silver screen. The iconic blond-haired, blue-eyed doll will be featured in an coming live-action comedy, Sony Pictures and Mattel announced Wednesday. Production for the movie, which Sony sees as its next big global franchise, is set to begin at the end of the year. Written by Jenny Bicks ("What a Girl Wants," "Rio 2") and produced by Walter F. Parkes and Laurie MacDonald, the movie will draw on Barbie's unique resume. Over the years, Barbie dolls have come in more than 150 different looks, including princess, president, mermaid and movie star, and the character will inhabit many of those roles on-screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
An outdoor screening of Amy Heckerling's teen comedy "Clueless" and a dance-along screening of Luis Valdez's Ritchie Valens biopic "La Bamba" will be among the Los Angeles Film Festival's free community screenings, organizer Film Independent has announced. The community screenings will also include a program of Buster Keaton's "Sherlock Jr. " and "Cops" accompanied by the French garage rock band Magnetix; a presentation of "I Am Big Bird" with "Sesame Street" puppeteer Caroll Spinney in attendance; and the world premiere of the documentary "Limited Partnership," about two pioneers in the struggle for same-sex marriage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Michael Miller and Rhea Mahbubani
Fourteen years ago, a group of movie lovers banded together to organize the first Newport Beach Film Festival. For the opening-night attraction at Fashion Island, they chose "Sunset Blvd.," the 1950 Billy Wilder drama which famously features a faded Hollywood actress snapping, "I am big. It's the pictures that got small!" As co-founder Todd Quartararo fretted outside the Edwards Big Newport 6 theater before showtime, though, he was more concerned about the size of the crowd than the size of the pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It was lost and now it's found, and the world of Orson Welles enthusiasts, which very much includes me, counts itself grateful and amazed. I am talking about 66 minutes of footage from an endeavor called "Too Much Johnson," which Welles shot in 1938, three years before "Citizen Kane" changed everything. Not only had this material never been seen publicly, it had been presumed gone forever when the villa in Spain where Welles thought it was stored burned down nearly half a century ago. Discovered in a warehouse in Pordenone, Italy, by local film society Cinemazero and beautifully restored via a collaboration between the George Eastman House in Rochester, N.Y., and the National Film Preservation Foundation, "Too Much Johnson" is ready for its Los Angeles close-up.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2014 | By Susan King
Valerie Harper is positively radiant these days. There's a sparkle in her eyes and a genuine warmth in her smile. Why not? She's defied the odds. Early last year, Harper was told she had three months to live. Harper, a non-smoker who had a cancerous tumor removed from her lung in 2009, has a rare form of lung cancer that had spread to areas around her brain.  "I was supposed to be dead a year ago," said Harper, 74. "We are all terminal, let's face it.  I did the shock and grief.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Maybe it's time for “screen time” for parents, too. To limit kids' television watching, the ubiquitous rule restricting the time they're allowed to spend in front of a TV or computer screen isn't as helpful as something more basic: how much time parents spend watching TV, scientists say in an article out Monday in the journal Pediatrics. "Do as I say, not as I do" might be a foundation for Homer Simpson's style of parenting, but it's not so effective, the scientists say. “Parent  television viewing is a stronger predictor of child television viewing than traditional media 'access' and 'rules' variables regardless of child age,” the scientists wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2010
MOVIES Join director Joel Schumacher ("Batman & Robin," "Flatliners") for a screening of his newest film, "Twelve," based on the critically acclaimed novel by Nick McDonell, which was written when the author was just 17. The story centers around students in the elite Upper East Side prep school world of sex, drugs and college admissions, and culminates in a birthday party that no one is likely to forget. Chase Crawford and Emma Roberts star with narrator Kiefer Sutherland. Egyptian Theatre, 6712 Hollywood Blvd.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Samsung Electronics Co. has produced the most formidable rival yet to the iPhone 5s: the Galaxy S5. The device, released over the weekend, is the fifth edition of the company's successful line of Galaxy S smartphones. Its predecessor, the Galaxy S4, sold more than 10 million units worldwide just one month after being launched last year. The GS5 may be more of an incremental step forward from its predecessor and will face more competition from capable, lower-cost devices. But the new Galaxy is expected to be one of the highest-selling phones in the U.S. this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Leah Ollman
"Presentism: Light as Material" at YoungProjects is first and foremost a visual experience. The work by a dozen artists has plenty of conceptual heft and emotional resonance, but stakes its primary claim on our attention through optical means. This used to be a given in art, but for many decades now it's been just another option on the strategic menu. "Presentism" awakens a wistful gratitude for the direct sensual hit. The show, intended to complement the James Turrell retrospective recently closed at LACMA, induces a state of wonder that often feels primal, inversely related to the sophistication of the technology used to achieve it. Most of the pieces, whether videos, projections, or light-driven sculptural installations, reverberate in the body with a distilled, low-tech purity.
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