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ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2000 | ROBERT W. WELKOS and LORENZA MUNOZ, Robert W. Welkos and Lorenza Munoz are Times staff writers
The specter of a double-barreled work stoppage has sparked a boom-time atmosphere in the movie industry. After months of lethargy, studios have cranked up production schedules, putting films like Michael Crichton's "Timeline" and the sequel to "Men in Black" on the fast track so principal filming can be finished before time runs out.
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BUSINESS
April 18, 2009 | Richard Verrier
For Hollywood actors, the third act was anticlimactic. After a year of warring with studios, another union and even among themselves, Hollywood's actors finally reached an accord Friday for a new labor contract, signaling an end to a costly drama that roiled the entertainment industry just as it tumbled into the worst economic downturn in decades.
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BUSINESS
April 18, 2009 | Richard Verrier
For Hollywood actors, the third act was anticlimactic. After a year of warring with studios, another union and even among themselves, Hollywood's actors finally reached an accord Friday for a new labor contract, signaling an end to a costly drama that roiled the entertainment industry just as it tumbled into the worst economic downturn in decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2000 | ROBERT W. WELKOS and LORENZA MUNOZ, Robert W. Welkos and Lorenza Munoz are Times staff writers
The specter of a double-barreled work stoppage has sparked a boom-time atmosphere in the movie industry. After months of lethargy, studios have cranked up production schedules, putting films like Michael Crichton's "Timeline" and the sequel to "Men in Black" on the fast track so principal filming can be finished before time runs out.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Harvard Law School had to do without "L.A. Law"-yers Harry Hamlin, Michelle Green, Richard Dysart and Blair Underwood (a.k.a., respectively, Michael Kuzak, Abbie Perkins, Leland MacKenzie and Jonathan Rollins) because the university could not afford to buy them first-class airline tickets from Los Angeles to Boston. The dispute arose two weeks ago, according to David VanCleve, president of the Harvard Law School Forum, sponsor of the "An Evening with L.A. Law" forum scheduled for Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bobby Bass, veteran motion picture and television stuntman considered a legend in Hollywood for his feats in the guise of such bigger-than-life actors as John Wayne and Sylvester Stallone, has died. He was 65. Bass died Wednesday in Los Angeles after suffering from Parkinson's disease. "He was a remarkable man," actress Bo Derek, Bass' stepdaughter, told the Associated Press. "He's an absolute legend in this business. Everyone just revered him."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The backers of tonight's benefit premiere of "The Russia House," starring Sean Connery and Michelle Pfeiffer, hope it will be more than a glittering debut of a new movie. They want it to be the beginning of a turnaround for the Motion Picture and Television Fund that has seen contributions sharply decline in the face of rising costs. "It's not a crisis situation," said Roger Davis, a top executive at the William Morris Agency and the current fund president. "But the problem is that we're starting to lose money and we depend heavily on voluntary contributions and bequests from the film industry's employees."
BUSINESS
October 14, 2000 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unemployment fell again in California and the Los Angeles area last month, driven by the robust economy and especially growth in construction and motion-picture jobs, the state Employment Development Department reported Friday. California's jobless rate slid to 4.8% in September from 5.1% in August. It was the lowest rate since April. Los Angeles County unemployment dropped to 5.3% from 5.5% in August while joblessness in Orange County dipped to a seasonally unadjusted 2.5% from 2.8%.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1990 | PAT H. BROESKE and JOHN M. WILSON
For decades, the unwritten rule for film and television stars has been: It's OK to be gay as long as you don't flaunt it, publicly acknowledge it or get caught at it. But the rules are changing. Outing--revealing the homosexuality of closeted celebrities and public figures--got started a year ago in a segment of the gay press. Now, it's crossed over to the tabloids and even to some mainstream publications and TV shows. Names have been named, photos published and details of sex lives discussed.
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