Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScreen Extras Guild
IN THE NEWS

Screen Extras Guild

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 4, 1987 | From United Press International
The Screen Extras Guild went on strike today against the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers over a proposed 40% wage and benefit reduction. Harry Klemm, a spokesman for the union, said the guild's 6,000 members walked off their television and movie sets. "The stalemate is the 40% cut in wages and benefits," Klemm said. "We have told them we would not accept that type of cut and they have refused to budge."
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 10, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
They are the anonymous hotel clerks, courtroom jurors and store patrons who populate countless movies, TV shows and commercials. Hollywood's background actors, better known as extras, are accustomed to keeping a low profile — blending in, doing what they are told, and avoiding the limelight reserved for the stars. But a recent action by local and state officials has thrust the entertainment industry's least recognized performers into the spotlight. Last month, the Los Angeles city attorney's office and California labor commissioner took the unusual step of issuing a cease-and-desist letter to Central Casting in Burbank — the largest company for extras — ordering it to stop charging an upfront fee that they said violated state law. Similar warning letters were sent to 13 other L.A. casting companies.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1986 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Faced with shrunken bargaining power and currently in a fight for its life, the Screen Extras Guild, long the weakest union in Hollywood, is examining a strategy that a number of other unions have pursued in recent years--merger. The extras' union, with 6,700 members, has what appears at first blush to be an unusual suitor--the 1.6-million member Teamsters Union, the nation's largest labor organization. The two unions have been holding negotiations in recent weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1992
Re "Pact Would Cut Pay of TV, Movie Extras" (Metro, Feb. 25): Having spent the last decade working as a stand-in and extra and as a member of the Screen Extras Guild and Screen Actors Guild, I find it tragic that in these tough economic times when the motion picture and television business traditionally thrives that faceless producers find it necessary to cut our salaries another 25% (a few years ago they slashed our salaries from $96 to $86 a...
NEWS
February 12, 1987 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
The week-old Screen Extras Guild strike against six major studios and one independent producer over wage cuts was tentatively settled Wednesday, but a spokesman said the guild now plans to go after non-union film makers "in an aggressive manner." Neither the guild nor the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers would divulge terms of the tentative agreement. They simply issued a joint press release calling it a "win-win" situation.
NEWS
February 2, 1987
An estimated 300 members of the Screen Extras Guild picketed the entrances to Universal Studios Tour in Universal City on Sunday, protesting what they claim is a proposal by motion picture and television producers to cut wages and benefits for extras by 40%. Los Angeles police reported the picketers caused no problems other than slight traffic delays near the entrances to the tour.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1990 | From United Press International
Producers Sue Actors Guild: The Alliance of Motion Picture Producers filed suit against the Screen Actors Guild in U.S. District Court, accusing the union of violating a labor agreement by seeking to represent the actors who work as extras in films and television. The federal court suit seeks an injunction to prevent SAG from negotiating for the extras, a role now performed by a separate union, the Screen Extras Guild.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Can We Talk?: With the possibility of a production slowdown looming, Hollywood's major studios and production companies will convene bargaining talks today with the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television & Radio Artists. A news blackout has been imposed on the negotiations, which are expected to last until Feb. 12. A key issue is whether SAG will be allowed to become bargaining agent for the Screen Extras Guild.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1987
Please let people know that the "extra" Sean Penn had an altercation with was a non-union ( not an SEG member) extra working for Orion Pictures (Morning Report, June 5). We professionals of the Screen Extras Guild would never take photographs of a star on the set before first clearing it with the star and the first assistant director. Continually are we made to look the fool when enjoined under the title "extra" with these non-union folk who work for scab wages on a lark.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1990
I must point out that this letter is my opinion only, as I am on a number of boards of directors in the entertainment field and what I say does not reflect their opinions. I am sick and tired of listening to Heston's Republican and conservative view. I am beginning to believe that Jesse Helms and Heston are one and the same. Just a few weeks ago Heston wrote in The Times, "I'm ashamed of my union," . . . meaning Equity. Well, I have news for you, Mr. Heston, a lot of people in the entertainment unions are not only ashamed of you but are tired of your anti-union stand.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Can We Talk?: With the possibility of a production slowdown looming, Hollywood's major studios and production companies will convene bargaining talks today with the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television & Radio Artists. A news blackout has been imposed on the negotiations, which are expected to last until Feb. 12. A key issue is whether SAG will be allowed to become bargaining agent for the Screen Extras Guild.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1991
David J. Fox's article "If She Looks Strangely Familiar, Don't Give Her a Dime," about the making of "Where the Day Takes You," really angered me (Film Clips, Aug. 4). Hollywood Boulevard isn't just "drug dealers, prostitutes, homeless and other assorted street people." It's also store owners, business men and women, tourists and hard-working, honest people. And we wonder why the rest of the world preconceives Hollywood the way we project it in the films we make. But the real topper was Cinetel President Paul Hertzberg's hiring "hundreds of people from the streets" to work as extras.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1990
I must point out that this letter is my opinion only, as I am on a number of boards of directors in the entertainment field and what I say does not reflect their opinions. I am sick and tired of listening to Heston's Republican and conservative view. I am beginning to believe that Jesse Helms and Heston are one and the same. Just a few weeks ago Heston wrote in The Times, "I'm ashamed of my union," . . . meaning Equity. Well, I have news for you, Mr. Heston, a lot of people in the entertainment unions are not only ashamed of you but are tired of your anti-union stand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1990
Mathews writes that "one person" said it is "not unheard of for a film company to hire extras to serve as 'location wives' for lonely crew members toiling out of town." In 20 years as an extra, I have not heard of this practice. I'm sure many producers, actors and crew members have taken friends and/or lovers on location and then cast them as extras to cover up the real reason they were there. But I seriously doubt that unknown persons would be hired as "location wives."
BUSINESS
March 5, 1990 | From United Press International
Producers Sue Actors Guild: The Alliance of Motion Picture Producers filed suit against the Screen Actors Guild in U.S. District Court, accusing the union of violating a labor agreement by seeking to represent the actors who work as extras in films and television. The federal court suit seeks an injunction to prevent SAG from negotiating for the extras, a role now performed by a separate union, the Screen Extras Guild.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers has asked a federal court to bar the Screen Actors Guild from taking over representation of Hollywood extras, court papers revealed today. A suit filed in Los Angeles on Tuesday claims that SAG's proposed takeover of the Screen Extras Guild's union jurisdiction violates SAG's agreement with the producers' association.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers has asked a federal court to bar the Screen Actors Guild from taking over representation of Hollywood extras, court papers revealed today. A suit filed in Los Angeles on Tuesday claims that SAG's proposed takeover of the Screen Extras Guild's union jurisdiction violates SAG's agreement with the producers' association.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | From Associated Press
The 4,500-member Screen Extras Guild, which staged a month-long strike earlier this year, has approved a new three-year contract with TV commercial producers, a spokesman for the guild reported. Members voted 1,633 to 81 to accept the contract, Paul Antico, a member of the SEG board of directors, announced Friday. The new pact preserves the daily rate and also provides a slight raise for hand models and a wardrobe allowance for other actors, Antico said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1988
I could not believe my eyes when I read the letter by Marguerite Cravatt of Creative Casting (Calendar Letters, Jan. 24). She states "most people who work as extras have flexible, full-time jobs . . . most do not depend on extra work as permanent income. . . ." She must not be aware of the hundreds and hundreds of extras that I see day after day. Many of us are using extra work as our sole source of income while we persue careers as actors. Perhaps we full-timers do not work often with her agency precisely because of her attitude towards us. Since she is hired by the producers, of course she would take their side.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|