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Screen Savers

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NEWS
January 18, 2001
Screen savers evolved to solve a problem that no longer exists. Early computer monitors could not display the same image for too long without discoloring the screen's glass. The discoloration created faint distortion--or a ghostly burn that obscured everything else on the screen. Newer monitors don't have this problem, but screen savers remain popular. * Researched by AARON CURTISS/Los Angeles Times Source: www.howstuffworks.com * How Stuff Works: www.howstuffworks.com
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BUSINESS
February 24, 2008 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Use a computer with an Energy Star designation. It consumes 70% less electricity than other computers. If left inactive, Energy Star computers enter a low-power mode and use 15 watts or less. Spending a large portion of time in low-power mode not only saves energy, but helps equipment run cooler and last longer. To maximize savings with a laptop, put the AC adapter on a power strip that can be turned off or will turn off automatically. The transformer in the AC adapter draws power continuously, even when the laptop is not plugged into the adapter.
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BUSINESS
February 24, 2008 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Use a computer with an Energy Star designation. It consumes 70% less electricity than other computers. If left inactive, Energy Star computers enter a low-power mode and use 15 watts or less. Spending a large portion of time in low-power mode not only saves energy, but helps equipment run cooler and last longer. To maximize savings with a laptop, put the AC adapter on a power strip that can be turned off or will turn off automatically. The transformer in the AC adapter draws power continuously, even when the laptop is not plugged into the adapter.
NEWS
January 13, 2008 | Jeremy Manier, Chicago Tribune
Few insurance company employees can say they help unravel the secrets of the universe in their spare time. Jeff Renkar can. Day and night, Renkar's six personal computers at his home outside Houston are helping run complex simulations of how the early universe evolved, as part of a new University of Illinois project called cosmologyhome. In the eight years since the California-based SETI Institute thought of embedding software in people's screen savers that would help sift through radio noise from space for possible signals from alien civilizations, some 40 research groups have launched projects based on the same principle.
NEWS
January 13, 2008 | Jeremy Manier, Chicago Tribune
Few insurance company employees can say they help unravel the secrets of the universe in their spare time. Jeff Renkar can. Day and night, Renkar's six personal computers at his home outside Houston are helping run complex simulations of how the early universe evolved, as part of a new University of Illinois project called cosmologyhome. In the eight years since the California-based SETI Institute thought of embedding software in people's screen savers that would help sift through radio noise from space for possible signals from alien civilizations, some 40 research groups have launched projects based on the same principle.
OPINION
August 28, 2003
How many Californians keep an old television set or computer monitor stashed in the garage, a closet or a back room? Millions, because so few can figure out just how to get rid of the stuff. Worse than storing that electronic mess, many have hidden a machine in the bottom of the trash barrel or cloaked it in a large garbage bag headed for the landfill. That's illegal, of course. So what to do?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2007 | CHARLIE AMTER
ATTENDANCE at multiplexes nationwide may be down, but one Los Angeles theater is bucking the trend. Regency's Fairfax Cinemas has been gaining momentum over the last six months as a destination theater. The draw? Three-dollar tickets. The theater, at Beverly Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue -- right near the Pacific Theatres at the Grove's 14 screens -- was formerly a Laemmle art house.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1995
Wiz Technology Inc., a San Juan Capistrano software publisher, will produce and distribute Sea World Screen Savers, programs that flash images of Shamu the killer whale and other creatures across inactive computer monitors. Wiz entered into an agreement with Busch Entertainment Corp., a division of Anheuser-Busch and owner of Sea World, to produce the promotional product. The screen saver will be included free with Wiz's software products.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1994 | MARTHA GROVES
The controversy over software patents keeps going and going and going. The latest conflict arising from a broad patent in the field involves PC Dynamics, a tiny Westlake Village outfit that has raked in a cool $1 million-plus by selling a computer screen saver program featuring the Energizer Bunny, used for years by Eveready to promote batteries. PC Dynamics was astonished to learn that Software Advertising Corp.
REAL ESTATE
August 13, 2000 | GARY and JASON ABRAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How long has that torn window screen been letting bugs into your house? Most homeowners do not realize that repairing aluminum-frame screens is an easy do-it-yourself task that takes about 15 minutes. All the supplies you need can be found at most local hardware stores. Pick up enough screen mesh to overlap the frame at least an inch on all sides; a "screen tool," which looks like a small pizza cutter (about $4); some long-nose pliers (about $4); and a utility knife (about $3).
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2007 | CHARLIE AMTER
ATTENDANCE at multiplexes nationwide may be down, but one Los Angeles theater is bucking the trend. Regency's Fairfax Cinemas has been gaining momentum over the last six months as a destination theater. The draw? Three-dollar tickets. The theater, at Beverly Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue -- right near the Pacific Theatres at the Grove's 14 screens -- was formerly a Laemmle art house.
OPINION
August 28, 2003
How many Californians keep an old television set or computer monitor stashed in the garage, a closet or a back room? Millions, because so few can figure out just how to get rid of the stuff. Worse than storing that electronic mess, many have hidden a machine in the bottom of the trash barrel or cloaked it in a large garbage bag headed for the landfill. That's illegal, of course. So what to do?
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | DAVID COLKER, david.colker@latimes.com
Personalized screen savers are cool, for a couple of weeks or so. Then it's easy to tire of that one picture on your computer screen of a significant other, beloved pet or favorite vacation spot, especially if your computer spends a lot of time in screen saver mode. To add a bit of variety, why not turn your static screen saver into a slide show that includes several pictures? It's fairly easy to do, using inexpensive shareware available for either the Windows or Macintosh platforms.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | JEFF LEVY, jefflevykfi@hotmail.com
During the early days of the PC, screens had black backgrounds with green or amber characters. If the material on the screen sat static for a period of time, the images would be burned or etched onto the screen's surface. The current crop of color monitors can display colors without any danger of burning images onto the screen. Nonetheless, Windows has screen savers available, which now are most often used to keep data away from prying eyes.
HOME & GARDEN
February 17, 2001 | LYNN O'DELL
Flying toasters and exploding fireworks don't save energy, although that's what most computer users think screen savers do. Some screen savers use as much energy as word processing. Energy use in office equipment is one of the fastest growing sources of electricity consumption in U.S. homes and businesses, according to the federal government.
NEWS
January 18, 2001
Screen savers evolved to solve a problem that no longer exists. Early computer monitors could not display the same image for too long without discoloring the screen's glass. The discoloration created faint distortion--or a ghostly burn that obscured everything else on the screen. Newer monitors don't have this problem, but screen savers remain popular. * Researched by AARON CURTISS/Los Angeles Times Source: www.howstuffworks.com * How Stuff Works: www.howstuffworks.com
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | JEFF LEVY, jefflevykfi@hotmail.com
During the early days of the PC, screens had black backgrounds with green or amber characters. If the material on the screen sat static for a period of time, the images would be burned or etched onto the screen's surface. The current crop of color monitors can display colors without any danger of burning images onto the screen. Nonetheless, Windows has screen savers available, which now are most often used to keep data away from prying eyes.
REAL ESTATE
August 13, 2000 | GARY and JASON ABRAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How long has that torn window screen been letting bugs into your house? Most homeowners do not realize that repairing aluminum-frame screens is an easy do-it-yourself task that takes about 15 minutes. All the supplies you need can be found at most local hardware stores. Pick up enough screen mesh to overlap the frame at least an inch on all sides; a "screen tool," which looks like a small pizza cutter (about $4); some long-nose pliers (about $4); and a utility knife (about $3).
NEWS
December 29, 1998 | PATT MORRISON
Tantalized by the notion of extraterrestrial intelligence, even if you're not yet persuaded that intelligent life exists on Earth? Then the people leading that search want you . . . to employ a screen-saver program in your desktop personal computer that, along with thousands of others, can analyze billions and billions of raw bits of space data collected from a 1,000-foot-diameter radio dish operated in Arecibo, Puerto Rico, by SETI, the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence folks.
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