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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1989 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a trial that alternately resembles a sitcom and a primer on Hollywood back-stabbing and big-buck negotiations, the trial of Art Buchwald vs. Paramount Pictures Corp. gave onlookers a glimpse last week into the "creative process" that brings stars like Eddie Murphy to the neighborhood bijou. From quips by talk show host Arsenio Hall ("I'm kind of an only child. I have a brother in a coma.") to humorist Art Buchwald ("An East German guy says, 'What business should I go into?'
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1989 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a trial that alternately resembles a sitcom and a primer on Hollywood back-stabbing and big-buck negotiations, the trial of Art Buchwald vs. Paramount Pictures Corp. gave onlookers a glimpse last week into the "creative process" that brings stars like Eddie Murphy to the neighborhood bijou. From quips by talk show host Arsenio Hall ("I'm kind of an only child. I have a brother in a coma.") to humorist Art Buchwald ("An East German guy says, 'What business should I go into?'
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BUSINESS
October 2, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Ever wonder how long it takes a typist to type up a screenplay? Those in the business say it requires at least 10 hours to professionally type a 100-page screenplay. It takes at least another three hours to proof the script. And typing screenplays that are handwritten can take at least twice as long, experts say. Another Hollywood industry that relies on screenwriters--and which screenwriters depend upon heavily--is the agency business.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1989
Radha Bharadwaj of Los Angeles and Mark Lowenthal of Santa Monica have been awarded $20,000 each as winners of the fourth Don and Gee Nicholl Screenwriting Fellowships, a one-year grant to allow completion of screenplays. Other winners are: James McGlynn of Pawtuxet, R.I.; Deborah Pryor of Virginia Beach, Va.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1989
Radha Bharadwaj of Los Angeles and Mark Lowenthal of Santa Monica have been awarded $20,000 each as winners of the fourth Don and Gee Nicholl Screenwriting Fellowships, a one-year grant to allow completion of screenplays. Other winners are: James McGlynn of Pawtuxet, R.I.; Deborah Pryor of Virginia Beach, Va.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Writers Guild of America gave out several honorary awards during its 40th annual presentation last week. They are: Screen Laurel Award (lifetime screen-writing achievement), Irving Ravetch and Harriet Frank Jr; Morgan Cox Award (consistent service to the WGA), Dan Taradash; Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award (for lifetime achievement in television writing), Bob Schiller and Bob Weiskopf; Valentine Davies Award (for general contributions to entertainment and the community), Lois Peyser.
NEWS
October 14, 1988
William A. Tunberg, 83, a screenwriter whose credits include "Old Yeller," "Garden of Evil," "Massacre" and "Savage Sam." A one-time saxophonist with several big bands, Tunberg later formed his own group and played in the Los Angeles area. He started in the film industry as a film editor at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer before moving into screen writing. In Vista, Calif., on Oct. 4 of cancer.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When Steve Sharon wrote the screenplay to the Clint Eastwood thriller "The Dead Pool," he didn't rely much on outside help. He typed away on a computer in his Huntington Beach home. He didn't even use a typing service or a research assistant. "I can do the typing just as quickly myself," he said. "And I prefer to do my own research so I have a fuller understanding of whatever it is I'm writing about." But he does have his own special--and rather costly--computer equipment.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1989
Now that the Oscar races are heating up, I would like to nominate screen writing for the category of dubious distinction. Because members vote on what they see rather than what they read, there is no way of knowing if a screenplay was well written. This is especially true of big-name productions, where dialogue and structure are generally polished and reworked by a range of high-priced talent. The year's best script might be one that wasn't even produced--a good possibility in an industry where access to its power players is everything.
NEWS
July 16, 1988
Milton Robert Krims, 84, whose screen-writing career dated to 1934 and the release of the Jack Oakie film, "Dude Ranch," based on Krims' novel. Over the years, he was under contract to most of the major studios, and his credits included "Green Light," "Anthony Adverse," "Confessions of a Nazi Spy," "We Are Not Alone," "Dispatch From Reuters," "Foxes of Harrow" and "Iron Curtain." He also wrote for the "Perry Mason" and other television series.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Ever wonder how long it takes a typist to type up a screenplay? Those in the business say it requires at least 10 hours to professionally type a 100-page screenplay. It takes at least another three hours to proof the script. And typing screenplays that are handwritten can take at least twice as long, experts say. Another Hollywood industry that relies on screenwriters--and which screenwriters depend upon heavily--is the agency business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1987
William Rose, an American screenwriter who won an Academy Award for "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" and whose other Hollywood and British film credits include such classic comedies as "The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming" and "The Ladykillers," died at his home in England. He was 68 and the cause of his death last week was not reported. Rose, who also wrote the script for "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World," lived on the English Channel island of Jersey.
NEWS
August 1, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Michel Audiard, an optician and racing cyclist who turned to screen writing in the 1940s and then wrote more than 100 scripts over the next 40 years, died Sunday at his suburban Paris home after a long illness. He was 65, and the cause of his death was not announced. Although best known in his native France, Audiard's films released in the United States included "Peekaboo" in 1951 and "Babette Goes to War" in 1960.
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