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BUSINESS
February 9, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
A former Transportation Security Administration screener who dished dirt about the agency in a recent story was lying or describing long-abandoned practices. That was the agency's response to a story in Politico by former TSA agent Jason Edward Harrington. In the piece, Harrington described TSA agents at Chicago O'Hare International Airport who struggled with low morale, targeted travelers from specific countries for pat-down searches and poked fun at images created by full-body scanners.
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BUSINESS
February 9, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
A former Transportation Security Administration screener who dished dirt about the agency in a recent story was lying or describing long-abandoned practices. That was the agency's response to a story in Politico by former TSA agent Jason Edward Harrington. In the piece, Harrington described TSA agents at Chicago O'Hare International Airport who struggled with low morale, targeted travelers from specific countries for pat-down searches and poked fun at images created by full-body scanners.
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NEWS
February 5, 2004 | Patrick Day
The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted unanimously Tuesday night to expel member Carmine Caridi. The 42-member board decided to revoke Caridi's membership after the 69-year-old actor admitted to the FBI that he had passed on Academy Award "screener tapes" to another person, violating a signed agreement. The tapes were given to Russell William Sprague of Homewood, Ill., and eventually wound up on the Internet.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
On Thursday, the head of the Transportation Security Administration visited Los Angeles International Airport, the site of a Nov. 1 shooting, where he rejected the idea of arming TSA security officers. TSA chief John Pistole visited LAX to announce the opening of an enrollment center where passengers can submit background information to apply to use faster screening lines. When asked about the Nov. 1 shooting that killed TSA agent Gerardo Hernandez, 39, and wounded three others, Pistole said he had rejected the idea of arming TSA agents at the screening gates.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2005 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
Hear that sound of crunching plastic? That's Hollywood bigwigs trying to avoid a criminal rap. The Oscar ballots are due Tuesday, but it's been raining DVDs since November, when the studios began sending out screeners of any movie that might possibly catch the fancy of the 5,808 members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and end up with one of the 112 or so major nominations, let alone one of the 24 prizes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2013 | By Scott Gold, Joel Rubin and Kate Mather
A composed, solitary gunman shot his way into Los Angeles International Airport on Friday morning, killing a transit security screener and injuring at least one more before being wounded by police and taken into custody. The incident was over in less than 10 minutes but caused chaos at the world's sixth-busiest airport and disrupted thousands of flights across the nation. The suspected gunman was identified as Paul Anthony Ciancia, 23, a New Jersey native who lives in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2009 | Associated Press
Orange County authorities say a man has been arrested at John Wayne Airport after a security screener found cocaine packages strapped to his legs under his baggy pants. Authorities say Paul Francis Smith was arrested Monday morning after a Transportation Security Administration screener patted him down and found two packages containing 4.4 pounds of cocaine worth $60,000. He was booked on suspicion of transportation and sale of cocaine, with bail set at $500,000. Orange County sheriff's spokesman Jim Amormino said the 22-year-old Smith, who was discharged from the U.S. Navy about two months ago, tried to conceal the drugs under baggy jogging pants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1989
When Maria Navarro called 911 ("4 Women Killed When Gunman Invades Party," Part 1, Aug. 29) and, in a fairly calm voice, asked for help because her estranged husband was coming to shoot up her birthday party, the Sheriff's Department dispatcher acted according to procedure and turned her down because there was no immediate threat. About 15 minutes later, Navarro and three others were dead or dying. How many sheriff's units at that time were having coffee or on routine investigations and could have been diverted without any loss of department effectiveness?
MAGAZINE
March 28, 2004
I read Paul Mazursky's essay on screener videos with much amusement, as I am good friends with a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences ("Pirate Booty," Metropolis, Feb. 29). Of course, I didn't get to borrow any videos this year, which is a real shame since I recently purchased a DVD copying machine. But how could my friend say "no" to his adult daughter? His unique solution: His daughter married a cinematographer--an academy member--so her family was eligible to view the precious tapes.
TRAVEL
August 7, 2005
I'M sure you received many comments on Laurie Berger's article ["Why Airport Screenings Vary," Travel Q&A, July 24]. Here's more. The TSA spokesman says the request to remove shoes may sound like a command. Let me attest to the fact that at most airports if one dares to go against the "request," the passenger is in big trouble. We passed through Alaska Airlines security in Seattle and I left my tennis shoes on. Two hours later, at Southwest, in the same airport, when they "requested" I take them off, I replied that they hadn't set off the alarms two hours ago. The screener called her supervisor, who pulled us out of line and tore our carry-ons apart.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2013 | By Hugo Martín
Are you tired of having airport security screeners toss away your bottles of water, shampoo or lotion? Change is on the way in some parts of the world. Battelle, a nonprofit research and development organization in Ohio, has built a screening device that London's Heathrow Airport began installing last week to test liquids carried by passengers onto planes. Heathrow Airport screeners will begin using the device in January, when the European Union will start allowing some liquids, aerosols and gels onto planes under a phased timetable.
OPINION
November 7, 2013 | By Brian Michael Jenkins
The recent shooting at Los Angeles International Airport has raised questions about how airport security can be improved, specifically, whether Transportation Security Administration airport screeners should be armed. In part, this reflects the natural tendency to examine every terrible event with a view of how to prevent its recurrence. But it also reflects the desire of Americans to create a risk-free society. From this perspective, a shooting with casualties like the one at LAX can only be the result of a failure of security, which therefore must be increased.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times staff
Passengers who had to abandon their luggage in Terminal 3 at Los Angeles International Airport after a gunman opened fire Friday may be able to retrieve their belongings Saturday, officials announced. There had been reports that passengers would be able to collect their luggage and other items left behind in the deadly melee at 7 a.m. Saturday, but the terminal remained mostly closed early Saturday morning. At about 7:30 a.m., LAX officials on Twitter appealed for patience as they tried to make arrangements for passengers to have access to their luggage later in the morning.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Richard Winton, Scott Gold, Samantha Schaefer, and Joseph Serna
Transportation Security Administration officials Friday night identified the agent killed in a rampage at LAX as Gerardo I. Hernandez, 39. Officials provided no details about Hernandez. A second TSA agent was also shot at LAX, but he has not been identified. "No words can explain the horror that we experienced today when a shooter took the life of a member of our family and injured two TSA officers at Los Angeles International Airport," TSA administrator John S. Pistole said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2013 | By Scott Gold, Joel Rubin and Kate Mather
A composed, solitary gunman shot his way into Los Angeles International Airport on Friday morning, killing a transit security screener and injuring at least one more before being wounded by police and taken into custody. The incident was over in less than 10 minutes but caused chaos at the world's sixth-busiest airport and disrupted thousands of flights across the nation. The suspected gunman was identified as Paul Anthony Ciancia, 23, a New Jersey native who lives in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2013 | By Dan Weikel, Scott Gold, Richard Winton, Brian Bennett, Joel Rubin, Joseph Serna, Ari Bloomkatz, Samantha Schaefer, Kate Mather, Matt Stevens, Jill Cowan, Alicia Banks and Laura J. Nelson
LAX shooting: The latest A composed, solitary gunman shot his way into Los Angeles International Airport on Friday morning, killing a transit security screener and injuring at least one more before being wounded by police and taken into custody. The incident was over in less than 10 minutes, but caused chaos at the world's sixth-busiest airport and disrupted thousands of flights across the nation. The gunman was identified as Paul Anthony Ciancia, a 23-year-old New Jersey native who lived most recently in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2013 | By Dan Weikel, Scott Gold, Richard Winton, Brian Bennett, Joel Rubin, Joseph Serna, Ari Bloomkatz, Samantha Schaefer, Kate Mather, Matt Stevens, Jill Cowan, Alicia Banks and Laura J. Nelson
LAX shooting: The latest A composed, solitary gunman shot his way into Los Angeles International Airport on Friday morning, killing a transit security screener and injuring at least one more before being wounded by police and taken into custody. The incident was over in less than 10 minutes, but caused chaos at the world's sixth-busiest airport and disrupted thousands of flights across the nation. The gunman was identified as Paul Anthony Ciancia, a 23-year-old New Jersey native who lived most recently in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times staff
Passengers who had to abandon their luggage in Terminal 3 at Los Angeles International Airport after a gunman opened fire Friday may be able to retrieve their belongings Saturday, officials announced. There had been reports that passengers would be able to collect their luggage and other items left behind in the deadly melee at 7 a.m. Saturday, but the terminal remained mostly closed early Saturday morning. At about 7:30 a.m., LAX officials on Twitter appealed for patience as they tried to make arrangements for passengers to have access to their luggage later in the morning.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2013 | By Hugo Martín
Travelers be warned: Misconduct cases among airport screeners jumped 26% in a recent three-year period. But the chance of an airport screener pilfering a laptop computer from your bag is still slimmer than winning the lottery, according to the union representing Transportation Security Administration workers. The debate over the integrity of TSA screeners heated up last week with the release of an audit by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, which found 9,622 cases of misconduct among TSA workers from fiscal 2010 through 2012, with a 26% increase in incidents over that time.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Under pressure from lawmakers and flight attendants, the Transportation Security Administration said it would indefinitely prohibit passengers from carrying small pocket knives on planes - a ban that began after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The decision is a dramatic reversal for TSA chief John Pistole. Two months ago he decided to lift the ban, saying the move would enable airport security officers to focus on bigger threats, such as explosives. Just days before the TSA planned to lift the ban April 25, Pistole said he was temporarily putting off the policy change to consider the comments and concerns of a security panel made up of pilots, flight attendants and other airline workers.
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