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NEWS
November 18, 2010 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
1. Passengers will be randomly directed to either a metal detector or a full-body scanning machine. Carry-on luggage will be sent through an x-ray machine, as usual. 2. Only passengers who refuse the body scan or who trigger an alarm in a metal detector will be subject to a pat-down. 3. The pat-down is conducted by a same-gender TSA agent. Agents have been instructed to use the open palms of their hands and fingers. 4. In addition, for women, TSA agents are instructed to pat around the edges of the bra area.
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NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times travel editor
How much is it worth to you to get through airport security faster? Most people would pay about $50, according to a Harris Poll released Thursday. Unfortunately for those folks, the Transportation Security Administration's PreCheck program, which allows expedited screening for prequalified passengers, charges $85 for five years of "fast pass" screening. The misapprehension may stem from this finding: 41% of respondents said they had never heard of PreCheck. Those are among the notions about the TSA and its procedures and programs that the survey of 2,234 adults revealed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2012
MOVIES See the Belgian crime epic "Bullhead" on the big screen for a one-week run. The film, which is nominated for a foreign language film Oscar, is the debut of Michaël R. Roskam and has already garnered comparisons to the work of Martin Scorsese because of its tightly wound tale of suspense about the cattle trade. Cinefamily, 611 N. Fairfax Ave., L.A. Fri. through Feb. 25. Opening night party with the director and star in person on Fri. $12. Times vary. (323) 655-2510; http://www.cinefamily.org.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Americans are split on whether airport screening lines make air travel safer. But at the same time, a majority of American adults worry that faster screening lines for travelers who submit background information might jeopardize airline safety. The latest measure of the public's attitute on airport security came from a poll of 2,234 adults in the U.S. by the Harris Poll. It comes only days after a teenage boy slipped undetected onto a Maui-bound jet at Mineta San Jose International Airport.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2010
'This Is Your Life' Where: Billy Wilder Theater at the Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. When: 7 p.m. Sunday Price: Free Info: (310) 443-7000; www.cinema.ucla.edu
OPINION
May 26, 2012
Re "Abandon PSA tests for men, key panel advises," May 22 When I was diagnosed with prostate cancer after a PSA screening and follow-up tests, I was told it could take 15 years to pose a threat. My doctor told me he would recommend doing nothing if I were in my 70s. Because I was 49, it made sense to have surgery right away. Why wait until the cancer spreads, making surgery riskier and more expensive? So I was appalled that the task force recommended dropping this beneficial test based on a 10-year study.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012
MOVIES Producer Matty Simmons gave his first-person memoir about the making of "Animal House" an apt title: "Fat, Drunk & Stupid: The Inside Story Behind the Making of Animal House. " But the movie's bawdy humor belied an envelope-pushing sensibility that would define American comedy for decades. He signs it alongside a screening of the classic film, where presumably he won't ask to dance with your date. Egyptian Theatre, 6712 Hollywood Blvd., L.A. 6:30 p.m. Sat. $11. americancinematheque.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2011
MOVIES Filmmaker Steven Soderbergh, who has recently made headlines with both his upcoming thriller, "Contagion," and his talk of shifting focus from directing to painting, will be in attendance for this screening of his 1993 film "King of the Hill. " Actor Jesse Bradford will join Soderbergh in taking audience questions after the show. The Cinefamily, 611 N. Fairfax Ave., L.A. 7 p.m. Sat. $12. (323) 655-2510. http://www.cinefamily.org.
NEWS
October 31, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Substance-abuse education and screening should be a part of almost every visit between a doctor and an adolescent, the nation's leading pediatricians said Monday. In a statement published in the November issue of the journal Pediatrics , members of the American Academy of Pediatrics said doctors can use a variety of screening tools to inquire into a teen's use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. The statement argues that no level of experimentation with drugs is safe.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2011
MOVIES Barbara Hammer: Experimenting in Life and Art The avant-garde filmmaker, a leading figure in lesbian and feminist cinema, appears to screen and discuss two of her recent works. "Generations" (2010), which she made with Gina Carducci, deals with aging and passing on the tradition of personal filmmaking; "A Horse Is Not a Metaphor" (2009) confronts Hammer's battle with cancer and experiences in chemotherapy. REDCAT , 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. 8:30 p.m. $9. (213)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It sounds contrived, and it is. It sounds like a bit of a stunt, and it is that too. It may even sound boring, but that it is not. In fact, whip-smart filmmaking by writer-director Steven Knight and his team combined with Tom Hardy's mesmerizing acting make the micro-budgeted British independent "Locke" more minute-to-minute involving than this year's more costly extravaganzas. Though a dozen actors are listed in "Locke's" credits, Hardy is the only one who appears on screen in this real-time drama that unfolds inside a moving BMW during the 85 minutes it takes construction foreman Ivan Locke to make a nighttime drive from Birmingham to London.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Barbie is going from the toy store shelf to the silver screen. The iconic blond-haired, blue-eyed doll will be featured in an coming live-action comedy, Sony Pictures and Mattel announced Wednesday. Production for the movie, which Sony sees as its next big global franchise, is set to begin at the end of the year. Written by Jenny Bicks ("What a Girl Wants," "Rio 2") and produced by Walter F. Parkes and Laurie MacDonald, the movie will draw on Barbie's unique resume. Over the years, Barbie dolls have come in more than 150 different looks, including princess, president, mermaid and movie star, and the character will inhabit many of those roles on-screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
An outdoor screening of Amy Heckerling's teen comedy "Clueless" and a dance-along screening of Luis Valdez's Ritchie Valens biopic "La Bamba" will be among the Los Angeles Film Festival's free community screenings, organizer Film Independent has announced. The community screenings will also include a program of Buster Keaton's "Sherlock Jr. " and "Cops" accompanied by the French garage rock band Magnetix; a presentation of "I Am Big Bird" with "Sesame Street" puppeteer Caroll Spinney in attendance; and the world premiere of the documentary "Limited Partnership," about two pioneers in the struggle for same-sex marriage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Michael Miller and Rhea Mahbubani
Fourteen years ago, a group of movie lovers banded together to organize the first Newport Beach Film Festival. For the opening-night attraction at Fashion Island, they chose "Sunset Blvd.," the 1950 Billy Wilder drama which famously features a faded Hollywood actress snapping, "I am big. It's the pictures that got small!" As co-founder Todd Quartararo fretted outside the Edwards Big Newport 6 theater before showtime, though, he was more concerned about the size of the crowd than the size of the pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It was lost and now it's found, and the world of Orson Welles enthusiasts, which very much includes me, counts itself grateful and amazed. I am talking about 66 minutes of footage from an endeavor called "Too Much Johnson," which Welles shot in 1938, three years before "Citizen Kane" changed everything. Not only had this material never been seen publicly, it had been presumed gone forever when the villa in Spain where Welles thought it was stored burned down nearly half a century ago. Discovered in a warehouse in Pordenone, Italy, by local film society Cinemazero and beautifully restored via a collaboration between the George Eastman House in Rochester, N.Y., and the National Film Preservation Foundation, "Too Much Johnson" is ready for its Los Angeles close-up.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2014 | By Susan King
Valerie Harper is positively radiant these days. There's a sparkle in her eyes and a genuine warmth in her smile. Why not? She's defied the odds. Early last year, Harper was told she had three months to live. Harper, a non-smoker who had a cancerous tumor removed from her lung in 2009, has a rare form of lung cancer that had spread to areas around her brain.  "I was supposed to be dead a year ago," said Harper, 74. "We are all terminal, let's face it.  I did the shock and grief.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2010
Only in Hollywood could a screenwriter mine the rather unsexy topics of water and land rights in Southern California during the early 20th century and come up with one of the most beguiling, beautiful and arresting films of all time. Robert Towne, who wrote the screenplay for "Chinatown," screens the 1974 classic, which won the Academy Award for original screenplay. After the film, Towne will be joined by California historian Kevin Starr, and Mark J. Harris and Ted Braun, USC cinematic arts professors, to discuss the film's resonance with our sense of Los Angeles.
OPINION
December 29, 2009
Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano wisely has backed off her statement that "the system worked" because a Nigerian terrorist failed to blow up an airliner on Christmas Day. The system decidedly didn't work if an explosive could be brought aboard a plane by a man whose radicalization had been brought to the attention of the United States by his father, a prominent banker. But as Congress and the Obama administration undertake inquests into this near disaster, their primary focus should be on lapses in human intelligence, not technology.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Samsung Electronics Co. has produced the most formidable rival yet to the iPhone 5s: the Galaxy S5. The device, released over the weekend, is the fifth edition of the company's successful line of Galaxy S smartphones. Its predecessor, the Galaxy S4, sold more than 10 million units worldwide just one month after being launched last year. The GS5 may be more of an incremental step forward from its predecessor and will face more competition from capable, lower-cost devices. But the new Galaxy is expected to be one of the highest-selling phones in the U.S. this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Susan King
Quincy Jones knew even at a young age that he wanted to compose film scores. "I used to go to movies for 11 cents," Jones said at his mansion nestled in the Bel-Air hills. "I used to play hooky in Seattle every day. I could tell if a movie was scored at 20th Century Fox with Alfred Newman or at Paramount with Victor Young. I could just feel it. " Jones, who studied with composers Nadia Boulanger and Olivier Messiaen in Paris in 1957, would become one of the top film composers in Hollywood by the 1960s.
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