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ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By John Horn
In Sacha Gervasi's "Hitchcock," director Alfred Hitchcock begins the production of "Psycho" by having his cast and crew swear an oath not to divulge any of the film's secrets. The first day of filming of "Hitchcock" itself followed a different route, with Gervasi, who was making his narrative feature debut on the film, feeling both "wonderful" and "panic. " In this excerpt from the fourth annual Envelope Directors Roundtable, our panel of six filmmakers-- Tom Hooper ( "Les Miserables" )
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | Rebecca Keegan
Every time Keira Knightley and director Joe Wright make a movie together, they go back in time -- from their new film, "Anna Karenina," (late 19th century Russia) to their last collaboration, "Atonement" (1930s and '40s England) to their first pairing, "Pride & Prejudice" (early 19th century England). In this excerpt from the Envelope Screening Series on Thursday, Knightley and Wright discuss why they consistently return to the format of the period film together. "They're fantasies to me," Wright said, of directing films set in other eras.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
If there's been one controversy that's dogged Quentin Tarantino for most of his career, it's been his frequent and pronounced use of the N-word in his scripts, dating all the way back to his debut film, "Reservoir Dogs. " Perhaps the only time that particular racial epithet hasn't been central to the discussion of one of his films was "Inglourious Basterds," when the N-word of choice was Nazis. But with "Django Unchained," the controversy is back, and Tarantino is getting an earful from all sides, including fellow filmmaker Spike Lee and comedian Katt Williams, who have been very vocal in their criticisms of Tarantino's word choice.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By John Horn
  It's one of the most riveting sequences in writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson's "The Master": Soon after spiritual leader Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) is dragged off to jail with reluctant disciple Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix), Dodd and Quell have a spectacular prison-cell fight. Phoenix thrashes about like a caged animal, while Hoffman as Dodd is increasingly enraged by Quell's demeanor and tells him that he is the only one who cares about him. It's one of several explosive acting moments in the critically acclaimed drama that is Anderson's first film since 2008's "There Will be Blood.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
There are many things that can draw a filmmaker to a project. It could be a great script or the chance to work with a talented actor. In the case of Ang Lee and "Life of Pi," it was fear. In this clip from the Envelope Directors Roundtable moderated by the Times' John Horn, Lee and five fellow top directors -- Tom Hooper ("Les Miserables"), Ben Affleck ("Argo"), Sacha Gervasi ("Hitchcock"), David O. Russell ("Silver Linings Playbook") and Kathryn Bigelow ("Zero Dark Thirty") -- discuss how the challenges of their work inspire and drive them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
“The Bathtub,” the grittily colorful Bayou region in “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” may seem like a difficult and impoverished place. After all, director Benh Zeitlin based it on towns outside the Louisiana levee system that have been destroyed and rebuilt dozens of times and lack what might be considered a conventional quality of life. But Zeitlin says that he views the Bathtub -- and the real-life towns that inspired it -- as something very different. “There's this kind of joyous spirit that's still intact and this culture that's still intact,” he told the audience at the Times' Envelope Screening Series earlier this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
"Safe Haven" will find no refuge at the box office the weekend, as the latest "Die Hard" movie is set to annihilate the competition.  "A Good Day to Die Hard," the fifth installment in the Bruce Willis action franchise, is expected to gross a robust $55 million by Monday evening, according to those who have seen pre-release audience surveys. 20th Century Fox, which released the film in theaters late Wednesday evening, is anticipating a softer opening of about $40 million. Either way, the weekend's other three nationwide debuts won't stand a chance at securing the No. 1 position.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
For a musician, there are probably more flattering movie roles to be offered than that of a guy who single-handedly ruins a record label with his dismal sales. Fortunately for British rocker Graham Parker, who plays such a character in the new Judd Apatow comedy "This Is 40," his decades in the music business have left him with a thick skin and a good sense of humor. In this clip from the Envelope Screening Series with The Times' Rebecca Keegan, Parker talks about his real-life reunion with his band the Rumour after 31 years and how they got involved in Apatow's film.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
Director Juan Antonio Bayona and screenwriter Sergio G. Sanchez would never have made "The Impossible" if it wasn't for their producer's chance discovery of a radio program featuring Maria Belon, a Spanish wife and mother who along with her family survived the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami . That initial discovery led to a long-term relationship with Belon, her husband and their three sons. The collaboration extended from Sanchez's script onto the set of the film. She spent hours with Bayona and Sanchez as they were writing the screenplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
What would you do for your work? Would you stop drinking liquids? Would you run for miles on an empty stomach? These were just some of the measures Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway were willing to go to for their roles in "Les Miserables. "  During The Envelope Screening Series, the two actors compared their efforts to transform their physical appearances for their parts as struggling 19th century French citizens. Jackman stopped drinking liquids for 36 hours to achieve his gaunt look as a slave in the opening scene of the film.
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