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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan
In director Joe Wright's highly stylized adaptation of "Anna Karenina," dance serves as a metaphor for characters' passions and fears. In this excerpt from the Envelope Screening Series on Thursday, Wright and his leading lady, Keira Knightley, explain the challenges of executing that vision. The most difficult sequence, Wright and Knightley agreed, was a dramatic ballroom scene staged by Belgian choreographer Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, involving Anna (Knightley), her paramour Vronsky (Aaron Taylor-Johnson)
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By John Horn
It's the fundamental conceit of Tom Hooper's  "Les Miserables" : Rather than have his actors record their songs in a studio and then lip-sync when cameras were rolling later, he filmed his cast, which includes Hugh Jackman and Oscar front-runner Anne Hathaway, performing their songs live on set. But the very conceit of the movie also proved to be one of the production's biggest challenges, Hooper said. DIRECTOR'S ROUNDTABLE: Six filmmakers talk shop In this clip from the Envelope Directors Roundtable moderated by the Times' John Horn, Hooper and five fellow top directors -- Ang Lee ("The Life of PI')
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By John Horn
If you have seen Paul Thomas Anderson's “The Master,” you might reasonably assume that very little was left to chance. From its precise cinematography to striking score, the writer-director's drama about a troubled drifter (Joaquin Phoenix) and a charismatic leader of a new movement (Philip Seymour Hoffman) feels as well-planned as a military operation. But in this excerpt from the Envelope Screening Series this week, Anderson explains that his two lead actors brought far more to their performances than he ever imagined, and that the film's production team frequently improvised.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
For a musician, there are probably more flattering movie roles to be offered than that of a guy who single-handedly ruins a record label with his dismal sales. Fortunately for British rocker Graham Parker, who plays such a character in the new Judd Apatow comedy "This Is 40," his decades in the music business have left him with a thick skin and a good sense of humor. In this clip from the Envelope Screening Series with The Times' Rebecca Keegan, Parker talks about his real-life reunion with his band the Rumour after 31 years and how they got involved in Apatow's film.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
“The Bathtub,” the grittily colorful Bayou region in “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” may seem like a difficult and impoverished place. After all, director Benh Zeitlin based it on towns outside the Louisiana levee system that have been destroyed and rebuilt dozens of times and lack what might be considered a conventional quality of life. But Zeitlin says that he views the Bathtub -- and the real-life towns that inspired it -- as something very different. “There's this kind of joyous spirit that's still intact and this culture that's still intact,” he told the audience at the Times' Envelope Screening Series earlier this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
There are many things that can draw a filmmaker to a project. It could be a great script or the chance to work with a talented actor. In the case of Ang Lee and "Life of Pi," it was fear. In this clip from the Envelope Directors Roundtable moderated by the Times' John Horn, Lee and five fellow top directors -- Tom Hooper ("Les Miserables"), Ben Affleck ("Argo"), Sacha Gervasi ("Hitchcock"), David O. Russell ("Silver Linings Playbook") and Kathryn Bigelow ("Zero Dark Thirty") -- discuss how the challenges of their work inspire and drive them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
Director Juan Antonio Bayona and screenwriter Sergio G. Sanchez would never have made "The Impossible" if it wasn't for their producer's chance discovery of a radio program featuring Maria Belon, a Spanish wife and mother who along with her family survived the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami . That initial discovery led to a long-term relationship with Belon, her husband and their three sons. The collaboration extended from Sanchez's script onto the set of the film. She spent hours with Bayona and Sanchez as they were writing the screenplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2000
KCSN-FM's (88.5) hourlong "Let's Do Lunch" program, hosted by Rene Engel, is being broadcast live each day this week from the Museum of Television & Radio in Beverly Hills. The museum is offering free admission to those who wish to watch the live show, which airs on KCSN weekdays at noon. Red Buttons will be today's guest. Other scheduled guests will be Jan Murray (Wednesday), Shelley Berman (Thursday) and Stan Freberg (Friday).
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