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Screening Series

ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | Rebecca Keegan
Every time Keira Knightley and director Joe Wright make a movie together, they go back in time -- from their new film, "Anna Karenina," (late 19th century Russia) to their last collaboration, "Atonement" (1930s and '40s England) to their first pairing, "Pride & Prejudice" (early 19th century England). In this excerpt from the Envelope Screening Series on Thursday, Knightley and Wright discuss why they consistently return to the format of the period film together. "They're fantasies to me," Wright said, of directing films set in other eras.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By John Horn
In Sacha Gervasi's "Hitchcock," director Alfred Hitchcock begins the production of "Psycho" by having his cast and crew swear an oath not to divulge any of the film's secrets. The first day of filming of "Hitchcock" itself followed a different route, with Gervasi, who was making his narrative feature debut on the film, feeling both "wonderful" and "panic. " In this excerpt from the fourth annual Envelope Directors Roundtable, our panel of six filmmakers-- Tom Hooper ( "Les Miserables" )
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Tom Hanks is one of the most popular, most decorated actors in Hollywood, and this year he delivered well-regarded performances in two films that were considered Academy Award contenders: "Captain Phillips" and "Saving Mr. Banks. " However, when Oscar nominations were announced Thursday morning, Hanks was left on the outside looking in, failing to secure nods for either his lead role in the former film or his supporting role in the latter. Hanks has a reputation as something of an Oscar darling, but his recent snubbing raises a question: Are academy voters over Hanks, or has he just not impressed them recently?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
The core of "Jamesy Boy" - a juvenile delinquent's inside-the-pen coming of age - follows a too-familiar trajectory: Due to the toxic mix of broken family and corruptive friends, James Burns (Spencer Lofranco) has already earned a tracking device on his ankle and an impressive rap sheet boasting robbery, vandalism, assault and firearm possession. Fresh-faced and all tatted up, James acts out as if emulous of the rapper MGK. Instead of being scared straight, he thrives in jail and fights anyone who gets in his way or menaces the defenseless Chris (Ben Rosenfield)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
BERKELEY, Calif. - Cheryl Cohen Greene likes to spend weekends close to home with her husband, Bob, a former postal worker. Often, they go hiking in the Berkeley Hills that surround their neighborhood, or watch movies in the living room of their modest duplex. At 68, Greene is trim for her age and says she'd lose 10 pounds if she didn't love food so much. She's a devoted grandmother who frequently visits with her two children and grandchildren. No one would guess that more than 900 people have paid to have sex with her. Greene has worked as a surrogate partner therapist for 40 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By John Horn
  It's one of the most riveting sequences in writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson's "The Master": Soon after spiritual leader Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) is dragged off to jail with reluctant disciple Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix), Dodd and Quell have a spectacular prison-cell fight. Phoenix thrashes about like a caged animal, while Hoffman as Dodd is increasingly enraged by Quell's demeanor and tells him that he is the only one who cares about him. It's one of several explosive acting moments in the critically acclaimed drama that is Anderson's first film since 2008's "There Will be Blood.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
Director Juan Antonio Bayona and screenwriter Sergio G. Sanchez would never have made "The Impossible" if it wasn't for their producer's chance discovery of a radio program featuring Maria Belon, a Spanish wife and mother who along with her family survived the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami . That initial discovery led to a long-term relationship with Belon, her husband and their three sons. The collaboration extended from Sanchez's script onto the set of the film. She spent hours with Bayona and Sanchez as they were writing the screenplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
Before making "Silver Linings Playbook" together, writer-director David O. Russell and Bradley Cooper had planned to join forces and battle the undead in Regency-era England in an adaptation of Seth Grahame-Smith's horror-lit mash-up "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. " The project died an unkind death, but the qualities that attracted Russell to Cooper for that remained fixed in the filmmaker's head. "He had really good bad-guy energy," in "The Wedding Crashers," Russell says in this clip from The Envelope Screening Series.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
There are many things that can draw a filmmaker to a project. It could be a great script or the chance to work with a talented actor. In the case of Ang Lee and "Life of Pi," it was fear. In this clip from the Envelope Directors Roundtable moderated by the Times' John Horn, Lee and five fellow top directors -- Tom Hooper ("Les Miserables"), Ben Affleck ("Argo"), Sacha Gervasi ("Hitchcock"), David O. Russell ("Silver Linings Playbook") and Kathryn Bigelow ("Zero Dark Thirty") -- discuss how the challenges of their work inspire and drive them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2000
KCSN-FM's (88.5) hourlong "Let's Do Lunch" program, hosted by Rene Engel, is being broadcast live each day this week from the Museum of Television & Radio in Beverly Hills. The museum is offering free admission to those who wish to watch the live show, which airs on KCSN weekdays at noon. Red Buttons will be today's guest. Other scheduled guests will be Jan Murray (Wednesday), Shelley Berman (Thursday) and Stan Freberg (Friday).
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