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ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By John Horn
In Sacha Gervasi's "Hitchcock," director Alfred Hitchcock begins the production of "Psycho" by having his cast and crew swear an oath not to divulge any of the film's secrets. The first day of filming of "Hitchcock" itself followed a different route, with Gervasi, who was making his narrative feature debut on the film, feeling both "wonderful" and "panic. " In this excerpt from the fourth annual Envelope Directors Roundtable, our panel of six filmmakers-- Tom Hooper ( "Les Miserables" )
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | Rebecca Keegan
Every time Keira Knightley and director Joe Wright make a movie together, they go back in time -- from their new film, "Anna Karenina," (late 19th century Russia) to their last collaboration, "Atonement" (1930s and '40s England) to their first pairing, "Pride & Prejudice" (early 19th century England). In this excerpt from the Envelope Screening Series on Thursday, Knightley and Wright discuss why they consistently return to the format of the period film together. "They're fantasies to me," Wright said, of directing films set in other eras.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2012
As the director of "Argo," Ben Affleck knew who he wanted in the starring role as CIA agent Tony Mendez: himself. "I was just greedy for this part in this movie," Affleck said at The Envelope Screening Series. What's more, he joked, the director and the actor "were sleeping together, so I talked myself into it. " Affleck was able to cast an array of established actors (Bryan Cranston, John Goodman, Alan Arkin) in prominent roles and a variety of up-and-comers (Clea Duvall, Rory Cochrane)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan
In director Joe Wright's highly stylized adaptation of "Anna Karenina," dance serves as a metaphor for characters' passions and fears. In this excerpt from the Envelope Screening Series on Thursday, Wright and his leading lady, Keira Knightley, explain the challenges of executing that vision. The most difficult sequence, Wright and Knightley agreed, was a dramatic ballroom scene staged by Belgian choreographer Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, involving Anna (Knightley), her paramour Vronsky (Aaron Taylor-Johnson)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
If there's been one controversy that's dogged Quentin Tarantino for most of his career, it's been his frequent and pronounced use of the N-word in his scripts, dating all the way back to his debut film, "Reservoir Dogs. " Perhaps the only time that particular racial epithet hasn't been central to the discussion of one of his films was "Inglourious Basterds," when the N-word of choice was Nazis. But with "Django Unchained," the controversy is back, and Tarantino is getting an earful from all sides, including fellow filmmaker Spike Lee and comedian Katt Williams, who have been very vocal in their criticisms of Tarantino's word choice.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
Brad Pitt's "Killing Them Softly" suffered the kind of deadly hit at the box office this weekend that its protagonist might have admired. A wide opening from The Weinstein Co. yielded a paltry $7 million, barely enough for seventh place in a crowd of holdovers. It was one of the lowest-ever wide openings for Pitt, and could wind up as his second-lowest grosser in nearly 20 years. If dismal attendance wasn't enough, the people who did come out to "Killing" wanted to whack it: The movie averaged a rock-bottom "F" CinemaScore.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
BERKELEY, Calif. - Cheryl Cohen Greene likes to spend weekends close to home with her husband, Bob, a former postal worker. Often, they go hiking in the Berkeley Hills that surround their neighborhood, or watch movies in the living room of their modest duplex. At 68, Greene is trim for her age and says she'd lose 10 pounds if she didn't love food so much. She's a devoted grandmother who frequently visits with her two children and grandchildren. No one would guess that more than 900 people have paid to have sex with her. Greene has worked as a surrogate partner therapist for 40 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By John Horn
  It's one of the most riveting sequences in writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson's "The Master": Soon after spiritual leader Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) is dragged off to jail with reluctant disciple Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix), Dodd and Quell have a spectacular prison-cell fight. Phoenix thrashes about like a caged animal, while Hoffman as Dodd is increasingly enraged by Quell's demeanor and tells him that he is the only one who cares about him. It's one of several explosive acting moments in the critically acclaimed drama that is Anderson's first film since 2008's "There Will be Blood.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
There are many things that can draw a filmmaker to a project. It could be a great script or the chance to work with a talented actor. In the case of Ang Lee and "Life of Pi," it was fear. In this clip from the Envelope Directors Roundtable moderated by the Times' John Horn, Lee and five fellow top directors -- Tom Hooper ("Les Miserables"), Ben Affleck ("Argo"), Sacha Gervasi ("Hitchcock"), David O. Russell ("Silver Linings Playbook") and Kathryn Bigelow ("Zero Dark Thirty") -- discuss how the challenges of their work inspire and drive them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
“The Bathtub,” the grittily colorful Bayou region in “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” may seem like a difficult and impoverished place. After all, director Benh Zeitlin based it on towns outside the Louisiana levee system that have been destroyed and rebuilt dozens of times and lack what might be considered a conventional quality of life. But Zeitlin says that he views the Bathtub -- and the real-life towns that inspired it -- as something very different. “There's this kind of joyous spirit that's still intact and this culture that's still intact,” he told the audience at the Times' Envelope Screening Series earlier this week.
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