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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2012
As the director of "Argo," Ben Affleck knew who he wanted in the starring role as CIA agent Tony Mendez: himself. "I was just greedy for this part in this movie," Affleck said at The Envelope Screening Series. What's more, he joked, the director and the actor "were sleeping together, so I talked myself into it. " Affleck was able to cast an array of established actors (Bryan Cranston, John Goodman, Alan Arkin) in prominent roles and a variety of up-and-comers (Clea Duvall, Rory Cochrane)
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | Rebecca Keegan
Every time Keira Knightley and director Joe Wright make a movie together, they go back in time -- from their new film, "Anna Karenina," (late 19th century Russia) to their last collaboration, "Atonement" (1930s and '40s England) to their first pairing, "Pride & Prejudice" (early 19th century England). In this excerpt from the Envelope Screening Series on Thursday, Knightley and Wright discuss why they consistently return to the format of the period film together. "They're fantasies to me," Wright said, of directing films set in other eras.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By John Horn
For writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson, creating the script for "The Master" was essentially a two-step process. First, he created a character, Freddie Quell, in search of a story. Then Anderson buried himself in research to "fill up the tank" of the plot, looking for ideas and themes that ultimately add up to "time better spent than actual typing. " In this excerpt from The Envelope Screening Series, Anderson, discussing his first film since 2007's "There Will Be Blood," talks about how he keeps himself open to finding material in every place he looks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By John Horn
  It's one of the most riveting sequences in writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson's "The Master": Soon after spiritual leader Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) is dragged off to jail with reluctant disciple Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix), Dodd and Quell have a spectacular prison-cell fight. Phoenix thrashes about like a caged animal, while Hoffman as Dodd is increasingly enraged by Quell's demeanor and tells him that he is the only one who cares about him. It's one of several explosive acting moments in the critically acclaimed drama that is Anderson's first film since 2008's "There Will be Blood.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
“The Bathtub,” the grittily colorful Bayou region in “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” may seem like a difficult and impoverished place. After all, director Benh Zeitlin based it on towns outside the Louisiana levee system that have been destroyed and rebuilt dozens of times and lack what might be considered a conventional quality of life. But Zeitlin says that he views the Bathtub -- and the real-life towns that inspired it -- as something very different. “There's this kind of joyous spirit that's still intact and this culture that's still intact,” he told the audience at the Times' Envelope Screening Series earlier this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
There are many things that can draw a filmmaker to a project. It could be a great script or the chance to work with a talented actor. In the case of Ang Lee and "Life of Pi," it was fear. In this clip from the Envelope Directors Roundtable moderated by the Times' John Horn, Lee and five fellow top directors -- Tom Hooper ("Les Miserables"), Ben Affleck ("Argo"), Sacha Gervasi ("Hitchcock"), David O. Russell ("Silver Linings Playbook") and Kathryn Bigelow ("Zero Dark Thirty") -- discuss how the challenges of their work inspire and drive them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The tsunami sequence in the new film "The Impossible" is so terrifying in its intensity that you might believe you're watching actual documentary footage of the natural disaster that struck Southeast Asia on Dec. 26, 2004, killing hundreds of thousands. The verisimilitude is the result of more than a year's work of exacting planning - and experimentation - by director Juan Antonio Bayona and his visual- and special-effects supervisors, who used a giant water tank in Spain (the largest in Europe)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2000
KCSN-FM's (88.5) hourlong "Let's Do Lunch" program, hosted by Rene Engel, is being broadcast live each day this week from the Museum of Television & Radio in Beverly Hills. The museum is offering free admission to those who wish to watch the live show, which airs on KCSN weekdays at noon. Red Buttons will be today's guest. Other scheduled guests will be Jan Murray (Wednesday), Shelley Berman (Thursday) and Stan Freberg (Friday).
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2008 | SUSAN KING
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science's Academy Foundation's Institutional Grants Program announced Tuesday that it has awarded $500,000 to 58 film-related nonprofit organizations in the U.S. and Canada. Among the local organizations receiving money for programs are the California Institute of Arts, Loyola Marymount University, USC's Master of Professional Writing Program and School of Cinematic Art, UCLA's Film and Television Program and Workplace Hollywood. Local institutional grants were awarded for the job training program at Hollywood Cinema Production Resources, the screening series at UCLA Film and Television archive, the Access LA Seminar Series and Screenwriting Lab at Outfest.
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