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Screening Series

ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
This year's Black List, a ranking of hot screenplays that have not yet finished principal photography, honors scripts about the NFL draft, the early life of Dr. Seuss, and a 40-year search for three siblings taken from an Australian beach. The list is compiled by former production executive Franklin Leonard, who said more than 290 film executives contributed their 10 favorite scripts of the year. To be eligible for inclusion in the list, the scripts had to receive at least six mentions from inside the Hollywood development community.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
BERKELEY, Calif. - Cheryl Cohen Greene likes to spend weekends close to home with her husband, Bob, a former postal worker. Often, they go hiking in the Berkeley Hills that surround their neighborhood, or watch movies in the living room of their modest duplex. At 68, Greene is trim for her age and says she'd lose 10 pounds if she didn't love food so much. She's a devoted grandmother who frequently visits with her two children and grandchildren. No one would guess that more than 900 people have paid to have sex with her. Greene has worked as a surrogate partner therapist for 40 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
The shootings at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn., have stirred up a slew of gun-control sentiment in Hollywood. But an actor who stars in perhaps the most gun-heavy movie of the season says that an abundance of firearms in this country isn't necessarily the problem, and that reducing them isn't automatically the answer. "I don't think it's about more gun control," said Samuel L. Jackson, who stars as a conniving house slave in Quentin Tarantino's upcoming revenge fantasy "Django Unchained.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Cristy Lytal
For director Ang Lee's "Life of Pi," the story of a spiritual Indian boy stranded at sea with a tiger, Oscar-winning visual effects supervisor Bill Westenhofer, who is nominated for this year's Oscars, started with shots of actor Suraj Sharma alone on a lifeboat in a water tank against a blue screen. Working with 1,200 visual effects artists at several companies, he transformed this footage into the character of Pi Patel and a Bengal tiger on a vast, changeable sea. Rhythm & Hues, where Westenhofer works, conjured up most of the animals, seas and skies; other effects companies tackled everything from creating storm sequences and a sinking ship to making Sharma skinnier and Pondicherry, India, look like the 1970s.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
“The Bathtub,” the grittily colorful Bayou region in “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” may seem like a difficult and impoverished place. After all, director Benh Zeitlin based it on towns outside the Louisiana levee system that have been destroyed and rebuilt dozens of times and lack what might be considered a conventional quality of life. But Zeitlin says that he views the Bathtub -- and the real-life towns that inspired it -- as something very different. “There's this kind of joyous spirit that's still intact and this culture that's still intact,” he told the audience at the Times' Envelope Screening Series earlier this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
There are many things that can draw a filmmaker to a project. It could be a great script or the chance to work with a talented actor. In the case of Ang Lee and "Life of Pi," it was fear. In this clip from the Envelope Directors Roundtable moderated by the Times' John Horn, Lee and five fellow top directors -- Tom Hooper ("Les Miserables"), Ben Affleck ("Argo"), Sacha Gervasi ("Hitchcock"), David O. Russell ("Silver Linings Playbook") and Kathryn Bigelow ("Zero Dark Thirty") -- discuss how the challenges of their work inspire and drive them.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By John Horn
  It's one of the most riveting sequences in writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson's "The Master": Soon after spiritual leader Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) is dragged off to jail with reluctant disciple Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix), Dodd and Quell have a spectacular prison-cell fight. Phoenix thrashes about like a caged animal, while Hoffman as Dodd is increasingly enraged by Quell's demeanor and tells him that he is the only one who cares about him. It's one of several explosive acting moments in the critically acclaimed drama that is Anderson's first film since 2008's "There Will be Blood.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
Director Juan Antonio Bayona and screenwriter Sergio G. Sanchez would never have made "The Impossible" if it wasn't for their producer's chance discovery of a radio program featuring Maria Belon, a Spanish wife and mother who along with her family survived the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami . That initial discovery led to a long-term relationship with Belon, her husband and their three sons. The collaboration extended from Sanchez's script onto the set of the film. She spent hours with Bayona and Sanchez as they were writing the screenplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2000
KCSN-FM's (88.5) hourlong "Let's Do Lunch" program, hosted by Rene Engel, is being broadcast live each day this week from the Museum of Television & Radio in Beverly Hills. The museum is offering free admission to those who wish to watch the live show, which airs on KCSN weekdays at noon. Red Buttons will be today's guest. Other scheduled guests will be Jan Murray (Wednesday), Shelley Berman (Thursday) and Stan Freberg (Friday).
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