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NEWS
May 22, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
So, to paraphrase Dirty Harry, "Do you feel lucky, punk?" A couple of stories this week have put me in a philosophical state of mind, and when I start feeling that way, I think of Clint Eastwood's Inspector Harry Callahan, one of my favorite philosophers. In fact, Harry's famous movie line was the first thing that came to mind when I read The Times' story Monday on prostate cancer screening for men. The headlines summed it up: "PSA test for prostate cancer should be dropped, task force says.
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NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Burbank's Bob Hope Airport has begun offering PreCheck, the airport screening program that lets pre-approved travelers get through security faster. The Transportation Security Administration program is now in place at 103 airports across the U.S.; there are more than 450 commercial airports. In the Los Angeles area, LAX , Ontario , Long Beach , John Wayne/Orange County already have the program. That means travelers at those airports, if they are members of PreCheck, do not have to remove shoes, belts or jackets and can keep their liquids (still no more than 3 ounces)
HEALTH
March 15, 2010 | By Marilyn Elias, Special to The Times
Not only should parents and children be screened more routinely for depression, they also need access to care, says last year's report by the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine on the effects of parental depression. Adult primary care and pediatricians' offices could be convenient places for screening, but such screening happens infrequently, says John Williams, a professor of medicine and psychiatry at Duke University who studies depression treatment in primary care.
SPORTS
January 21, 2014 | Wire reports
Entering a big league ballpark will be a bit like going through an airport by 2015. Major League Baseball has told its 30 teams they must implement security screening for fans by then, either with hand-held metal detection or walk-through magnetometers. "This procedure, which results from MLB's continuing work with the Department of Homeland Security to standardize security practices across the game, will be in addition to bag checks that are now uniform throughout MLB," baseball spokesman Michael Teevan said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
For an $85 fee, you can apply with the Transportation Security Administration to use the faster airport screening lines that were previously reserved for frequent fliers. TSA chief John Pistole announced Friday a program to allow more travelers use the so-called PreCheck lines, which are available at 40 airports across the country. Travelers going through the PreCheck lines can avoid routine security measures, such as removing shoes, belts and coats and taking laptop computers out of their cases.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will resume its summer screening series on June 5 with the showing of Joss Whedon's 2012 adaptation of "Much Ado About Nothing. " The screening will be one of 25 events scheduled from June to August at the organization's Hollywood campus at 1341 Vine Street, adjacent to the Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study. (It's the site that was originally purchased to hold the academy's film museum.) Whedon and his cast, including Amy Acker, Alexis Denisoff, Clark Gregg, Nathan Fillion, Fran Krazn and Sean Maher, will be on hand for a post-screening Q&A. PHOTOS: Movie sneaks 2013 With the exception of the upcoming music documentary "Twenty Feet From Stardom," most of the screenings will be of classic films, a varied selection that includes Harold Lloyd's silent comedy "Safety Last" from 1923 and Disney's animated "Peter Pan" from 1953.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2013 | By Susan King
Oscar-winning writer-director Costa-Gavras, best known for his politically charged films such as 1969's "Z" and 1982's "Missing," will be making appearances this week at the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre and the New Beverly Cinema. The 80-year-old filmmaker will appear Wednesday at the Aero  in Santa Monica to introduce the screening of his 2002 film "Amen.," based on Rolf Hochhuth's play "The Deputy," revolving around a German SS officer (Ulrich Tukur) who learns that a process he developed to end typhus is being used to murder Jews.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
If you want to do brunch with comic book impresario Stan Lee, it will cost you -- right now about $1,550. That's the current minimum bid for a shot at attending a VIP brunch at the Catalina Film Festival on May 5 with the co-creator of Spider-man, the Hulk and a slew of other famous characters. The winning bidder gets a seat at the table and other cool stuff, including passes to the film festival in Avalon on Catalina Island, two autographed comic books and ferry tickets to get there and back.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Nardine Saad
Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy's buddy cop comedy "The Heat" will be screened in advance for Boston police officers and FBI agents. The city was stunned Monday after twin bombings at the Boston Marathon killed three people and injured scores more. Bullock, who plays an uptight "Miss Congeniality"-esque FBI agent sent to work on a case in Boston in the film, thought the screening was a small token of appreciation. "It's been an amazing tightknit community before this happened, and it just bonded a community even more," Bullock told CNN at tge CinemaCon gathering in Las Vegas.
HEALTH
July 6, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Increased screening during the last decade for colorectal cancer, the nation's second-leading cause of cancer deaths, has put a sharp dent in the prevalence of the disease and in the number of deaths resulting from it, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. As screening for the disease among those ages 50 to 75 increased from half to two-thirds of that population, the prevalence rate fell from 52.3 cases per 100,000 in 2003 to 45.4 per 100,000 in 2007. The death rate fell from 19 per 100,000 to 16.7 per 100,000 during the same period, the agency reported in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report . Those declines represent 66,000 fewer cancers during the period and 32,000 fewer deaths, the agency found.
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