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BUSINESS
October 30, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you don't like seeing commercials before films in movie theaters, here's the guy to blame. His name is Terry Laughren. And these days, Laughren is spending a lot of time defending the business of the New York firm of which he is chairman, Screenvision Cinema Network. The company doesn't create ads, but it is a sort of middle man that places 60-second commercials on more than 6,000 movie screens nationwide--or about one-third of all the first-run theaters in the United States.
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BUSINESS
October 30, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you don't like seeing commercials before films in movie theaters, here's the guy to blame. His name is Terry Laughren. And these days, Laughren is spending a lot of time defending the business of the New York firm of which he is chairman, Screenvision Cinema Network. The company doesn't create ads, but it is a sort of middle man that places 60-second commercials on more than 6,000 movie screens nationwide--or about one-third of all the first-run theaters in the United States.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW
Moviegoers may be surprised when a new type of advertising pops onto the screen later this month. Beginning July 28, viewers at nearly one-third of the country's movie screens will be shown not only trailers for upcoming movies, but also one for upcoming ABC television shows. Marketing experts are praising the ingenuity of the idea, but some theater owners are crying foul.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW
Moviegoers may be surprised when a new type of advertising pops onto the screen later this month. Beginning July 28, viewers at nearly one-third of the country's movie screens will be shown not only trailers for upcoming movies, but also one for upcoming ABC television shows. Marketing experts are praising the ingenuity of the idea, but some theater owners are crying foul.
NEWS
October 13, 1985 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
Mrs. George Acker loves ballroom dancing, designer gowns and raising funds for charities. She literally danced her way through Beverly Hills schools, first in a Beverly Hills children's dance troupe, later as a jitterbug dancer in high school and then as a ballroom and adagio dancer. Along the way she was a World War II WAVE.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1998 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood traditionally has turned a cold shoulder to sharing the silver screen with commercials from Madison Avenue. But theater chains that are spending heavily to erect costly cineplexes are warming up to the idea of the added revenue that pre-movie advertising can bring. Earlier this year, AMC began screening commercials at its movie theaters. In 1997, the fast-growing Regal Cinemas chain began showing ads, joining Carmike Cinemas, which has accepted commercials for more than a decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS, TIMES FILM EDITOR
The names on the giant marquee out front were Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton, but deep inside Bally's Casino Resort, in the Goldwyn Ballroom, the entertainment Thursday night was being provided by X-rated comic Andrew Dice Clay, rap singer Tone Loc and Mr. Las Vegas himself, Wayne Newton. The unlikely package was put together by 20th Century Fox to promote its coming movie, "The Adventures of Ford Fairlane," which stars Clay and Newton and features Loc.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1990 | MICHAEL CIEPLY and JACK MATHEWS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Walt Disney Co., in a get-tough move aimed at movie exhibitors, said it will stop showing its films in any theater that runs on-screen advertising with them. The ban is apparently the first such move by a major movie studio. It includes advertising by newspapers such as the Los Angeles Times, which for about 40 years has run promotional spots on movie screens in exchange for discount rates on movie directory listings in the paper. On-screen advertising "is a turn-off. Audiences don't like it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1991 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea of going to the movies without confronting commercials is so appealing to a Maryland state legislator that he has introduced a bill to outlaw ads on theater screens in that state. Beginning today, the proposed law will be debated in the Economic Matters Committee of the Maryland General Assembly House of Delegates.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1992 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Few truck owners have hitched their vehicles to bungee cords and dumped them off tall bridges. Not many have wrapped parachutes around their trucks, then dropped them from high-flying planes. And scant few have used their trucks to tug 420,000-pound railroad trains. All of these stunts--most recently the bungee cord drop--have been showcased in TV spots by truck makers.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1985 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
For years the television networks steadfastly refused to run 15-second commercials, arguing that they would add tothe clutter of 30- and 60-second spots shoehorned between episodes of "Dallas," "Miami Vice" and other programs. Then this fall, with advertising demand softer than it has been in years, ABC, NBC and CBS had a change of heart.
NEWS
April 24, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
Shortly before Eastern Air Lines overseas jets land on U.S. soil, flight attendants with transatlantic smiles hand passengers their customs declaration papers. Since December, about 200,000 passengers on these fights have found something odd tucked inside the forms. Advertisements. The ads have been placed by such companies as MasterCard, Fuji Film and even Walt Disney World in Florida.
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