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Screenwriters Labor Relations

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BUSINESS
May 12, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With an appeal for unity and little fanfare, a tense Writers Guild of America on Friday unveiled its campaign to sell a proposed three-year contract to 11,000 union members. Ratification of the contract hammered out last week with Hollywood producers has been considered a slam dunk. But the guild still must convince writers that the $41 million in additional payments claimed under this new contract is enough. Packages detailing provisions of the contract were mailed to guild members Friday.
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BUSINESS
May 14, 2001 | JAMES BATES and CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERs
Ultimately, the very people who sell words for a living didn't need any to convey to Hollywood's studios that there would be no strike this year by TV and film writers. It was May 2, the day the Writers Guild of America's contract with studios expired in the early morning hours. Protracted, tense talks had been dragging into the night all that week as Hollywood waited anxiously for a sign that they might finally reach a conclusion.
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BUSINESS
May 14, 2001 | JAMES BATES and CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERs
Ultimately, the very people who sell words for a living didn't need any to convey to Hollywood's studios that there would be no strike this year by TV and film writers. It was May 2, the day the Writers Guild of America's contract with studios expired in the early morning hours. Protracted, tense talks had been dragging into the night all that week as Hollywood waited anxiously for a sign that they might finally reach a conclusion.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With an appeal for unity and little fanfare, a tense Writers Guild of America on Friday unveiled its campaign to sell a proposed three-year contract to 11,000 union members. Ratification of the contract hammered out last week with Hollywood producers has been considered a slam dunk. But the guild still must convince writers that the $41 million in additional payments claimed under this new contract is enough. Packages detailing provisions of the contract were mailed to guild members Friday.
NEWS
May 5, 2001
Warner Bros. Chairman and Chief Executive Barry Meyer, right, was the backroom business brain behind the studio's television operation before being catapulted to the front office 18 months ago. He has built a reputation as an astute deal maker. Paramount Pictures Chairwoman Sherry Lansing is the highest-ranking woman in the movie business and a former producer whose credits include "Indecent Proposal" and "Fatal Attraction."
NEWS
May 7, 2001 | JAMES BATES and CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The testy negotiations between writers and studios over a new labor contract underwent a series of dramatic shifts before producing an ending last week that few players in Hollywood anticipated. Though many participants feared for months that a strike by the Writers Guild of America was all but inevitable, several pivotal events that took place behind the scenes paved the way for the breakthrough agreement that was unveiled Friday afternoon.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2001 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The possibility of a Hollywood actors' strike has thrown the celebrity-driven television talk shows and glossy magazines into a panic with stars expected to walk off the publicity circuit as well as the set. Labor tensions have producers at "Access Hollywood" frantically orchestrating interviews with the stars of the summer and fall movies, hoping their canned questions still feel fresh months from now when they air.
NEWS
May 7, 2001 | JAMES BATES and CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The testy negotiations between writers and studios over a new labor contract underwent a series of dramatic shifts before producing an ending last week that few players in Hollywood anticipated. Though many participants feared for months that a strike by the Writers Guild of America was all but inevitable, several pivotal events that took place behind the scenes paved the way for the breakthrough agreement that was unveiled Friday afternoon.
NEWS
May 5, 2001
Warner Bros. Chairman and Chief Executive Barry Meyer, right, was the backroom business brain behind the studio's television operation before being catapulted to the front office 18 months ago. He has built a reputation as an astute deal maker. Paramount Pictures Chairwoman Sherry Lansing is the highest-ranking woman in the movie business and a former producer whose credits include "Indecent Proposal" and "Fatal Attraction."
BUSINESS
April 26, 2001 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The possibility of a Hollywood actors' strike has thrown the celebrity-driven television talk shows and glossy magazines into a panic with stars expected to walk off the publicity circuit as well as the set. Labor tensions have producers at "Access Hollywood" frantically orchestrating interviews with the stars of the summer and fall movies, hoping their canned questions still feel fresh months from now when they air.
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