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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2007 | Susan King
In May 1997, the Los Angeles Times published J.R. Moehringer's heartfelt story "Resurrecting the Champ," chronicling the sad life of a professional boxer who was homeless and living on the streets. More than just a tale about the downfall of a sports figure, the article also dealt with Moehringer's relationship with "The Champ," as well as the writer coming to terms with his own father's abandonment of the family when he was a baby.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By David Colker
Lorenzo Semple Jr. was one of the hottest screenwriters in Hollywood in the 1970s and '80s, working on star-studded films such as "Papillon," with Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman; "Three Days of the Condor," headlined by Robert Redford; and "Never Say Never Again," Sean Connery's last movie as James Bond. But, rare in the trade, Semple didn't much mind if he was not the sole writer on a film. "Almost all the good scripts I've been involved in, I've been fired off of for one reason or another," he said in a 2011 video interview conducted by the Writers Guild Foundation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
From a snow-crested corner of Alberta, Canada, Kelly Oxford made her Hollywood screenwriting dream come true. She did it without leaving her close-knit family or giving up her free nationalized healthcare. She did it without toiling in Westside coffee shops or confronting painful rejections. She did it 140 characters at a time. Oxford, a suburban housewife and mother of three, is a Twitter superstar ( @kellyoxford ), with more than 350,000 followers. Oscar winners, late-night talk show hosts, even film critic Roger Ebert follow her on the social media service, eager to read wry observations about daily life and celebrity culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By David Colker
Screenwriter Eric Bercovici knew he was not the first choice to adapt "Shogun," the blockbuster 1975 novel by James Clavell about an English seaman marooned in 17th century Japan. Bercovici, who worked on the Paramount lot, read the novel anyway. "I knew right away how to adapt it," he said in a 1981 Los Angeles Times interview. "But damned if I would tell them. " Other writers fell by the wayside, and he was called to meet with Clavell, who had creative control over a proposed TV miniseries based on the book.
NEWS
September 11, 1994
The National Writers Workshop, a nonprofit organization for hopeful screenwriters, is holding its fifth annual screenwriting contest for minorities. American Film Institute graduate Willard Rogers founded the contest in 1990 as part of the workshop's Ethnic Minority Screenwriters Development and Promotional Program. Rogers, 53, head of the organization, established the $500 scholarship to discover talent in ethnic communities, which account for only 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1987
William Rose, an American screenwriter who won an Academy Award for "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" and whose other Hollywood and British film credits include such classic comedies as "The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming" and "The Ladykillers," died at his home in England. He was 68 and the cause of his death last Tuesday was not reported. Rose, who also wrote the script for "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World," lived on the English Channel island of Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2006
Oliver Stone, Neil LaBute, Brad Bird and Andrew Stanton are among the filmmakers who are scheduled to speak at Screenwriting Expo 5, a four-day conference about writing and selling scripts that is open to the public. The event, sponsored by Creative Screenwriting magazine, will be held Oct. 19-22 at the Los Angeles Airport Marriott and Renaissance Montura hotels. Admission is $74.95. For registration and information, call (800) 727-6978 or go to www.screenwritingexpo.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Scott Neustadter & Michael H. Weber / 'The Spectacular Now'
We wrote "(500) Days of Summer" because we loved the romantic comedy - and feared for its survival. What used to be "The Graduate" and "Annie Hall" and "When Harry Met Sally" had become the home of the unrealistic, the unrelatable and the insincere. The genre was in free-fall, and "500" was our attempt to breathe a little life back in. When looking for a follow-up, we turned our attention to the other genre we loved and missed: the teen movie. The '80s of our youth were chock-full of smart, sensitive, sometimes funny, sometimes heartfelt, always identifiable films about young people.
MAGAZINE
May 23, 1999 | DEANNE STILLMAN
Oon this very page, I once advanced a controversial theory. I argued that America is more like ancient Egypt than the Roman Empire, should anyone mistake it for the latter. Instead of the dead, we worship the famous, close-yet-distant souls who live forever in the media netherworld of the here and now. The capital of our state is Hollywood, mirage-maker to the world, vast repository of immortals. That's why I call the place Cairo-by-the Mojave--'twas ever thus and 'twill always be so.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1988 | PAT McGILLIGAN, Excerpted from a forthcoming article in Film Comment from "Backstory II: Interviews with Screenwriters of the '40s and '50s," University of California Press, 1989. and
He was dead, I was told. Or at least he wouldn't answer my letters (he didn't). When I finally trapped him on the telephone, he said he was far too busy to grant an interview. I said I was coming to see him anyway. Would he talk? He said, "We'll see." Philip Yordan is the great mystery man of the post-1930s generation of Hollywood screenwriters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2014 | By David G. Savage and Maura Dolan
WASHINGTON - The California-based 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals is known for progressive rulings that champion individual rights over government and corporations, but when it comes to show business, the "Hollywood Circuit" - as it has been dubbed - stands accused of routinely siding with the home-turf entertainment industry. Judges famously sided with film studios in the early 1980s when the studios sued Sony for infringing their copyrights by selling the Betamax video recorders.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
The 10 films nominated for this year's Academy Awards for original screenplay and adapted screenplay tell diverse and distinctive stories: those of a couple squabbling on a Greek vacation, an Irish mother searching for the child she was forced to give up, a Texas electrician turned AIDS activist, and a con artist compelled to work with the FBI on a corruption sting, to name a few. But a common thread emerged among many of the screenwriters in...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Melisa Wallack & Craig Borten
Craig Borten My emotional attachment to "Dallas Buyers Club" starts with the loss of my father, Buddy. In 1981, he was diagnosed with lymphoma and given six months to live. I observed firsthand the coldness and disconnect of the doctors as well as the limited protocols available. I remember my father's frustration with the medical system. Instead of accepting his sentence, he asked questions, became proactive and looked into alternative treatments in Mexico. Ultimately, my father lived for five more years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Kelly Marcel
Every writer who sits down and begins a screenplay thinks they know why they're doing it. Knowing why is essential to the process. But sometimes - maybe all of the time - we're fooling ourselves. We don't truly understand why we've written something until long after we're done. From the moment Alison Owen, our British producer, came to me with a preexisting script of P.L. Travers' story (by Sue Smith) and shared her ideas for how it could become the movie that's in theaters as we speak, I was enthralled.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Peter Morgan
I should declare I have never been a fan of motor racing. I don't watch Formula One, the intricacies of engine refinement and lap times leave me cold, I don't even drive fast. So how come "Rush" ended up being an unusually personal screenplay to me? The answer is that the two racers at the heart of the story, James Hunt and Niki Lauda, represent in some way two halves of me. I was born the son of immigrant Germans and was brought up in the UK, teased as "a Kraut. " Jump forward 20 years, and I married an Austrian and live in Vienna, where now I am known as "a Brit.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By John Ridley / ‘12 Years a Slave'
A nearly universal desire among writers is to make themselves conspicuous in their work. It's completely understandable. When a script that you've spent months - if not years - writing has your name on the title page, who wouldn't want the material inside to crackle with style; full of snappy rejoinders that audiences gleefully repeat as they exit the theater. Moments that scream: "I wrote that. " Having worked the whole of my professional life toward achieving such, it's kind of ironic that in adapting Solomon Northup's "Twelve Years a Slave" I would end up taking the exact opposite approach.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When Steve Sharon wrote the screenplay to the Clint Eastwood thriller "The Dead Pool," he didn't rely much on outside help. He typed away on a computer in his Huntington Beach home. He didn't even use a typing service or a research assistant. "I can do the typing just as quickly myself," he said. "And I prefer to do my own research so I have a fuller understanding of whatever it is I'm writing about." But he does have his own special--and rather costly--computer equipment.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
What superhero screenwriter will you not see at Comic-Con this year? That would be John August, who is toiling on the first draft of "Shazam!," the New Line Cinema film expected to bring Captain Marvel to the screen in one of the next few summers. "I've never been to Comic-Con," he says. "I'm sure I will be going down the road. I hear it's pretty intense, pretty massive." Massive and intense is exactly right.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Scott Neustadter & Michael H. Weber / 'The Spectacular Now'
We wrote "(500) Days of Summer" because we loved the romantic comedy - and feared for its survival. What used to be "The Graduate" and "Annie Hall" and "When Harry Met Sally" had become the home of the unrealistic, the unrelatable and the insincere. The genre was in free-fall, and "500" was our attempt to breathe a little life back in. When looking for a follow-up, we turned our attention to the other genre we loved and missed: the teen movie. The '80s of our youth were chock-full of smart, sensitive, sometimes funny, sometimes heartfelt, always identifiable films about young people.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2013 | By Susan King
Syd Field, described by many in the film community as the "guru of all screenwriters," has died at age 77. According to his website , Field died Sunday of hemolytic anemia at his Beverly Hills home, surrounded by his wife, family and friends. Field was the author of eight books, mostly notably "Screenplay: The Basics of Film Writing," considered the the industry's most authoritative guide to screenwriting. It is credited with helping establish the now traditional three-act structure for feature film scripts.
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