Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScrewball Comedy
IN THE NEWS

Screwball Comedy

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Shepard's lively and amusing "The Linguini Incident" (at selected theaters) is that rarity, a contemporary screwball comedy that actually works. It brings to mind "A Fish Called Wanda" both in its off-the-wall humor and in its equally distinctive cast. Indeed, it plays as if feature debuting director Richard Shepard and his co-writer, Tamar Brott, had created each role especially for the actor who plays it.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By Susan King
For several years in the 1940s, Preston Sturges wrote and directed a series of flawless social comedies that were an intoxicating mix of sophisticated dialog and freewheeling slapstick. The American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood is honoring the filmmaker with the new retrospective "Sturges Rally: Comedy Built for Speed," which opens Friday. Sturges, who was born in 1898 and died in 1959, came from a wealthy family and, as a young boy, helped out his mother's friend, Isadora Duncan, in her stage productions.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1995 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The most immediately apparent point made by "Movies She Wrote: Women Screenwriters in the Hollywood Studios," a UCLA Film and Television Archive series that begins Thursday, is that men haven't cornered the market on mediocrity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp, Los Angeles Times
Not long after Paul Feig created the beloved cult TV series "Freaks and Geeks" in 1999, studios began barraging him with coming-of-age sex comedy scripts, even though "Freaks," with its sweet, sympathetic portrait of the perils of adolescence, was spiritually opposed to that kind of lunkheaded, frat-boy humor. The mild-mannered Feig, the self-described "awkward guy" in high school, couldn't relate to any of the material's high-concept, horn dog ideas ("nerds don't hang out with frat guys unless you're Karl Rove trying to get in with them")
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
*** "Baby Boom" CBS/Fox. $89.98. Charles Shyer and Nancy Meyers (of "Irreconcilable Differences") thrust a baby upon workaholic Manhattan career woman Diane Keaton, with hilarious and touching results, in this sparkling comedy that's as topical as yuppiedom but honors the great '30s tradition of sophisticated screwball comedy. With Sam Shepard and Harold Ramis.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1987 | LEONARD KLADY and All AFI Film Festival of Los Angeles events will take place at the Los Feliz Theater, 1822 N. Vermont Ave., Hollywood, unless otherwise noted. Tickets are available at Ticketron, Teletron and at the box office one hour before showtime. Information: (213) 520-2000 , 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and , Klady is a Los Angeles - based film writer and reviewer. and
"Around the World in 80 Ways" (Australia, 1986, 9:30 p.m.). Screwball comedy lives in this antic yarn from Down Under. The plot-heavy tale concerns two sons who plan to cash in on their senile, virtually blind father's insurance policy by faking a world tour in their back yard--thus placating Dad's pursuit of his absconding wife.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | DOUG LIST
"The Devil and Miss Jones" (1941), directed by Sam Wood. 92 minutes. No rating. What stands out about this screwball comedy--about a rich capitalist who gets himself hired at one of his stores to ferret out those behind a union movement--are inspired performances by two of the cinema's greatest comedy stars, Jean Arthur and Charles Coburn. "A Shock to the System" (1990), directed by Jan Egleson. 91 minutes. Rated R.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chapman University concludes its screwball comedy series with two films made decades after the genre's Depression-era heyday. Last week, filmgoers saw "What's Up, Doc?," Peter Bogdanovich's 1972 comedy starring Barbra Streisand and Ryan O'Neal. In the final entry of the series, Chapman presents "Seems Like Old Times," a 1980 comedy written by Neil Simon and starring Goldie Hawn, Chevy Chase and Charles Grodin.
BOOKS
January 24, 1988 | Tom Nolan, Nolan writes the Mr. Los Angeles column for Los Angeles Magazine
A new kind of comedy began coming out of the Hollywood studios in the 1930s, writes the author of this massive and admirable study--a comedy not only funny but exhilarating, one that moved toward a "union between rapture and skepticism," where laughter equaled intimacy: "a deep involuntary motion of the spirit."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2013 | By Susan King
The documentary "Linsanity," about the Houston Rockets point guard Jeremy Lin, will open the 29th Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival. The festival, which takes places May 2-12 at various locations including the Directors Guild Theatre, will feature 140 films from 20 countries. The festival will feature world premieres and sneak previews of narrative and documentary films that shine a spotlight on Asian Pacific Americans as well as  the international Asian community. PHOTOS: Hollywood backlot moments "Linsanity," which premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival, chronicles Lin's life from his basketball days at Palo Alto High to his magical run in 2012 with the New York Knicks.The film was directed by Evan Jackson Leong.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2013 | By Susan King
The documentary "Linsanity," about the Houston Rockets point guard Jeremy Lin, will open the 29th Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival. The festival, which takes places May 2-12 at various locations including the Directors Guild Theatre, will feature 140 films from 20 countries. The festival will feature world premieres and sneak previews of narrative and documentary films that shine a spotlight on Asian Pacific Americans as well as  the international Asian community. PHOTOS: Hollywood backlot moments "Linsanity," which premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival, chronicles Lin's life from his basketball days at Palo Alto High to his magical run in 2012 with the New York Knicks.The film was directed by Evan Jackson Leong.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Susan King
The Los Angeles Conservancy is ringing in the holidays Sunday afternoon at the Orpheum Theater downtown with a screening of the beloved 1983 Yuletide comedy "A Christmas Story," starring Peter Billingsley, Darren McGavin and Melinda Dillon. (Billingsley is executive producing "A Christmas Story: A Musical," currently on Broadway) http://laconservancy.org In observance of World AIDS Day the American Cinematheque will celebrate the legacy of "The Garys" -- Gary Essert and Gary Abrahams -- Tuesday evening at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood with a screening of Randal Kleiser's 1996 drama "It's My Party.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Robert Abele
The abiding principle of screwball comedy is that as situations worsen for the characters in the story, the enjoyment level for the audience improves. That is not the case with "3,2,1 … Frankie Go Boom," a noisy stab at wacky wrongness that starts with reasonably plump possibility as a dispatch from the frontlines of viral video embarrassment hell. Skittish wannabe author Frankie (Charlie Hunnam), a self-imposed desert hermit, gingerly tests the waters of letting back into his life wayward brother Bruce (Chris O'Dowd)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2009 | By Susan King
The American Cinematheque's Egyptian Theatre blasts into the new year with "The Best of James Bond: 007," which features four Sean Connery classics and a double bill of the best -- or is that an oxymoron? -- of the Roger Moore Bond flicks. The martinis begin to shake Friday with 1962's "Dr. No," which made Connery a superstar. Ursula Andress, Joseph Wiseman and Jack Lord also star. Rounding out the evening is the fifth of the Connery Bonds, 1967's "You Only Live Twice," which is set in Japan and features a script by Roald Dahl.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2007 | CARINA CHOCANO
Watching "Lars and the Real Girl" recently, I had the feeling that I'd seen this story before. The movie stars Ryan Gosling as a lonely weirdo who purchases a life-size sex doll, imbues her with a saintly personality (she's a celibate paraplegic missionary who loves kids) and introduces her to his brother and sister-in-law as his girlfriend, Bianca. Naturally, they are horrified, as is everyone else in the small Midwestern town where they live.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
It's the dialogue, stupid. Sure, the directors and actors in the classic screwball comedies were terrific, but without some fantastic scripts all that talent would have gone to waste. UCLA Film and Television Archive's latest program, which opens Friday, gives these legendary scribes the respect they deserve.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Robert Abele
The abiding principle of screwball comedy is that as situations worsen for the characters in the story, the enjoyment level for the audience improves. That is not the case with "3,2,1 … Frankie Go Boom," a noisy stab at wacky wrongness that starts with reasonably plump possibility as a dispatch from the frontlines of viral video embarrassment hell. Skittish wannabe author Frankie (Charlie Hunnam), a self-imposed desert hermit, gingerly tests the waters of letting back into his life wayward brother Bruce (Chris O'Dowd)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
It's the dialogue, stupid. Sure, the directors and actors in the classic screwball comedies were terrific, but without some fantastic scripts all that talent would have gone to waste. UCLA Film and Television Archive's latest program, which opens Friday, gives these legendary scribes the respect they deserve.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
What goes up must come down, and so it is with romantic comedy, which can be currently seen down, down in the dumps with "Laws of Attraction." A leaden attempt to recapture the effervescence of classic screwball, this vehicle for star and executive producer Pierce Brosnan and to a lesser extent his partner in banter, Julianne Moore, confirms that two leads will attract each other with a force directed along the line of centers for the two objects, though sometimes alcohol may be involved.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2001 | F. Kathleen Foley
If Thomas Aquinas had written for the Marx Brothers, the result might have been a bit like "Incorruptible," Michael Hollinger's broad and breezy farce, now at the Colony Theatre. The action is set in Priseaux, a rural French village, in the year 1250.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|